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855 results

Article

Montessori Language Materials and Impact on Preschoolers' Language Development in Early Childhood Care and Development Centres (ECCDC) in Lagos State Nigeria

Available from: University of Lagos Library (Nigeria)

Publication: African Journal of Education and Behavioural Sciences, vol. 1, no. 1

Pages: 78-91

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Abstract/Notes: Languagge is one of the facilities that Preschoolers acquire in their early years and this is made possible by the interaction that they have with their environments - be it home, school where they grow and interact. To acquire language and develop vocabularies for communication, Montessori Language materials become invaluable tools for building and enhancing language versatility among preschoolers. Montessori materials like Large and Small Movable Alphabet boxes help in word building, while word lists help in vocabulary acquisition on a large scale. The study adopted descriptive survey and Quazi-experimental design. Four ECCDC were selected for the study; out of which two were used as experimental classes while the other two were used as control group. A total of 286 pupils from Lagos Education District 4 and 6 constituted the sample for the study. The treatment group was exposed to teaching and learning using the Montessori Language Materials (Large and Small Movable Alphabet boxes, word lists, phrases and sentence cards, etc.). The control group was also exposed to teaching and learning using the conventional instructional strategy. Instruments used for data collection were Public School Teachers' Questionnaire (PSTQ) and Pupils' Language Achievement Worksheets (PLAW). Data collected were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics such as simple percentages, mean and standard deviation, whilst independent t-test and ANCOVA were used to test the hypotheses formulated. The study revealed that majority of the teachers in the study had no adequate preparation for the level of education where they teach; that the pupils that had practical sessions using Montessori Language Materials performed better in spelling, word building and reading activities and had larger number of vocabulary acquisition than their peers in the control group. The study also revealed that most of the teachers had no Montessori training and as such, they were unable to implement Montessori methods in their classrooms. Therefore, the recommendations include: that teachers should make the learning of language more practical by the use of diverse instructional materials that are age appropriate and allow pupils the opportunity to find out things for themselves. In addition, professional preparation of the early years' teachers should be extensive as to embrace and inculcate best practices in the course of their training so that they can be skillful and resourceful in dispensing their duties in the classrooms.

Language: English

ISSN: 2536-7382

Article

Games: Language Games and Language Instructions

Available from: University of Connecticut Libraries - American Montessori Society Records

Publication: The Constructive Triangle (1965-1973), vol. 3, no. 3

Pages: 1-10

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Language: English

ISSN: 0010-700X

Article

[Mary Rogers] Kravchuk Shows How Language Works [Language Works company]

Available from: University of Connecticut Libraries - American Montessori Society Records

Publication: Public School Montessorian, vol. 11, no. 4

Pages: 16

Public Montessori

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Language: English

ISSN: 1071-6246

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Administrating Language: The Language Ideological Voices of Urban School Administrators in Urban Education

Available from: SAGE Journals

Publication: Urban Education, vol. 58, no. 10

Pages: 2462-2490

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Abstract/Notes: Urban schools are becoming increasingly linguistically diverse. However, principals are not adequately prepared to address linguistic variation, and in particular, issues related to African American Language (AAL). This study explores the language ideological voices of urban school administrators. Focus group sessions were conducted with 15 administrators of predominantly African American schools about the function of AAL in their students’ lives. Participants demonstrated variation in views toward AAL and struggled to name the language. These discussions were mediated by multiple, even competing, language ideologies, as they attempted to converse about the use of AAL in schools.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1177/0042085920959136

ISSN: 0042-0859

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

The Effects of Sign Language on Second Language Acquisition

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

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Abstract/Notes: This action research project examined the effects of sign language on the ability of primary students to learn new Spanish vocabulary in a bilingual Montessori classroom. The research took place at a public charter Montessori school in Washington, District of Columbia. Twenty-seven primary school aged children were included in this seven-week study. Sources of data collection included a parent-teacher questionnaire, a baseline assessment, daily observation logs, a daily checklist, a weekly journal, and a summative assessment. Students were grouped by Spanish fluency and taught eight different vocabulary words in Spanish. Half of the words were taught alongside a sign in American Sign Language and the other half were taught without an accompanying sign. The summative assessment data showed that students of all ages displayed a significant increase in their ability to recall new Spanish vocabulary words that were introduced with an accompanying sign in American Sign Language. Future research could examine the roles of sign language and gesturing in helping children recall vocabulary in the long-term.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2016

Article

Language Flowering, Language Empowering: 20 Ways Parents and Teachers Can Assist Young Children

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 13, no. 4

Pages: 31–35

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Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Archival Material Or Collection

Box 15, Folder 32 - Notes, ca. 1929-1948 - "The Incarnation of Language or The Sensitive Period for Language"

Available from: Seattle University

Edwin Mortimer Standing - Biographic sources, Edwin Mortimer Standing - Writings

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Language: English

Archive: Seattle University, Lemieux Library and McGoldrick Learning Commons, Special Collections

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

The Impact of Parent Involvement on Preschool English Language Learners' Ability to Learn the English Language

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

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Abstract/Notes: Montessori preschool children who are English Language Learners (ELL) age three to five, consisting of one female and six males. It was conducted in two different preschool classrooms, focusing on literacy skills as well as oral communication skills. The direct aim of the study was to help children successfully learn English as their second language while keeping their native language. Researchers also investigated whether parental involvement increased the ability of ELLs to learn the English language. Data collection procedures utilized were: (1) parent interviews, (2) observation and anecdotal records, (3) pretest, and (4) post-test. A take-home literacy kit was used to measure the effectiveness of parental involvement. Researchers also provided a take-home literacy kit for parents to work on with their child at home. Parents were given a total of four literacy kits, one new kit each week. Result of this research indicated an improvement in parent and child interaction. The take-home literacy kit fostered communication between parent and child because words were translated in their home language. Over the course of four weeks, children showed great interest in literacy and progress in their communication skills.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2014

Doctoral Dissertation

Birth to Three Language Acquisition: Influences of Ambient Language in the Montessori Setting

Available from: Long Island University - Institutional Repository

Language development, Montessori method of education - Evaluation

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Abstract/Notes: There is an expanse of literature looking at various topics supporting Montessori education, especially in preschool; however, there is a lack of research in infant and toddler Montessori classrooms. Most of the empirical data regarding language acquisition has focused on the child’s acquisition of vocabulary through direct instruction, rather than the learning capability from overhearing a third party in a naturalistic setting. The purpose of this intervention study was to add to the limited empirical research on language acquisition in infant and toddler Montessori environments. More specifically, the intervention assessed if infants and toddlers could indirectly acquire new vocabulary through the Absorbent Mind from teachers and peers’ ambient dialogue during the Montessori three-period lesson. The research utilized a descriptive, correlational pre-and-post quasi-experimental design to assess and analyze vocabulary and ambient language. Data collection occurred in three Association Montessori Internationale (AMI) and American Montessori Society (AMS) infant and toddler mixed-aged environments throughout New York State and Maryland. The Language Environmental Analysis (LENA) system was used to analyze audio recordings. Transcriptions of audio recordings quantified vocabulary acquisition and ambient language. Paired t-tests and ANCOVA were used to analyze children’s acquired vocabulary. A fidelity scale analyzed the extent to which Montessori trained teachers adhered to the three-period lesson intervention. The findings provide opportunities to improve infant and toddler teachers' classroom practice related to language acquisition. Suggestions were offered for early childhood teacher preparation programs.

Language: English

Published: Brookville, New York, 2021

Honors Thesis

The Seneca Language and Bilingual Road Signs: A Study in the Sociology of an Indigenous Language

Available from: Ohio State University - Knowledge Bank

Americas, Bilingualism, Indigenous communities, Indigenous peoples, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: One of the fundamental types of human rights concerns collective-developmental rights which allow minorities to use heritage languages and practices without external interference (Vašák 1977). The protected status of minority language rights is a critical part of language revitalization in which speakers of heritage languages, faced with the encroachment of more socially, politically, and economically dominant languages, embark on vigorous programs to ensure the survival and continued usage of their language. The Five Nations Iroquoian language, Seneca, has just a few remaining speech communities and a variety of ongoing language revitalization initiatives (Mithun 2012). To revitalize their traditional language, community classes through the Seneca Language Department and the Faithkeepers Montessori School Seneca Language Nest for young speakers have concentrated their efforts on preserving Onöndowa'ga:' Gawë:nö' the indigenous name for the Seneca language (Bowen 2020, Murray 2015). In the public sphere, a push by the Seneca Nation of Indians Department of Transportation fulfilling the intent of the federal Native American Tourism and Improving Visitor Experience (NATIVE) Act enacted in 2016, specifically included bilingual signs for state roads running through indigenous land in addition to other significant components (Figura 2016). In an area whose geographic names are strongly connected to Iroquoian languages including Seneca, these bilingual signs represent more public and visible Seneca language presence and stand as symbols of language revitalization. The place names and information that appear on the signs have considerable significance for community identity as well as linguistic and economic impacts, among others. Through oral histories collected from Seneca Nation members and language advocates in addition to a representative from the New York State Department of Transportation, this study pursues an analysis of the Seneca public usage of their heritage language and the various language revitalization efforts occurring among indigenous and minority communities internationally. As the COVID-19 pandemic threatens already vulnerable populations, heritage languages that have been historically oppressed face a global language crisis that disproportionately harms and disadvantages speakers of heritage and minority languages (Roche 2020). While the language of road signs may seem mundane, this study reveals how the Seneca bilingual signs play a significant role in awareness of indigenous territory and consequently stimulation of the local economy as well as supporting language learning, revitalization, and de-stigmatization. Primarily through the efforts of the Seneca community, the bilingual signs represent the expression of language rights in the public sphere and one part of the ongoing language revitalization.

Language: English

Published: Columbus, Ohio, 2021

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