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Montessori-Pädagogik bei mehrfach und verschiedenartig behinderten Kindern in der Montessori-Sonderschule [Montessori pedagogy for children with multiple and different disabilities in the Montessori special school]

Book Title: Die Montessori-Pädagogik und das behinderte Kind: Referate und Ergebnisse des 18. Internationalen Montessori Kongresses (München, 4-8 Juli 1977) [Montessori Pedagogy and the Handicapped Child: Papers and Results of the 18th International Montessori Congress (Munich, July 4-8, 1977)]

Pages: 330-335

Children with disabilities, Conferences, International Montessori Congress (18th, Munich, Germany, 4-8 July 1977), Special education

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Language: German

Published: München: Kindler, 1978

ISBN: 3-463-00716-9

Book

Montessori-Pädagogik: aktuelle und internationale Entwicklungen: Festschrift für Harald Ludwig [Montessori Pedagogy: Current and International Developments: Festschrift for Harald Ludwig]

Europe, Germany, Maria Montessori - Philosophy, Montessori method of education - History, Montessori movement, Western Europe

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Abstract/Notes: Harald Ludwig, ordentlicher Professor für „Reformpädagogik unter besonderer Berücksichtigung der Montessori-Pädagogik“ an der Westfälischen Wilhelms-Universität Münster, Leiter des Montessori-Zentrums am Institut für Schulpädagogik und Allgemeine Didaktik, Herausgeber zahlreicher Publikationen mit vielen, über die ganze Welt verstreuten wissenschaftlichen und freundschaftlichen Kontakten, wird emeritiert. Der vorliegende Band 10 der Reihe mit dem Titel „Montessori-Pädagogik — aktuelle und internationale Entwicklungen“ wird ihm zu Ehren als Festschrift herausgegeben und spricht wichtige Dimensionen der Montessori-Pädagogik an: anthropologische, historische, internationale und didaktische sowie Aspekte der Lehrerausbildung und insbesondere auch die vielfältigen Aufgaben des Montessori-Zentrums Münster.

Language: German

Published: Münster, Germany: Lit, 2005

ISBN: 3-8258-8429-5 978-3-8258-8429-1

Series: Impulse der Reformpädagogik , 10

Article

President Wilson's Daughter to Aid Mme. Montessori Show Her System

Available from: Library of Congress

Publication: The Sun (New York) (New York City, NY)

Pages: 6

Americas, Maria Montessori - Biographic sources, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: The Montessori movement, considered by many a radical departure from traditional educational methods, will receive new emphasis and publicity from the fact that visitors to the Panama-Pacific International Exposition will see during the months of August, September, October and November not only a demonstration of the Montessori system but will see it conducted by the talented woman herself. Associated with her will be Miss Margaret Wilson, daughter of the President, Dr. David Starr Jordan, chancellor of Leland Stanford Junior University, and other well known educators. The Montessori method has been summed up as 'freedom for development of the child under best conditions disturbing as little as possible but helping buy every means this development.' Any estimate of Mme. Montessori's work to be of practical value will involve a comparison between the Montessori method and that of the kindergarten, since the kindergarten is the only system of organizes educational work for young children that has so far received general recognition. In the middle of the last century the sensitive woman soul and philosophic mind of Froebel grasped the fundamental principle of development and say that the first six or seven years are the most important in the life of the individual. After years of study he embodied what he conceived to be the fundamental principles of the education of little children in what is known as the kindergarten, and his ideas of the best means for the application of these principles in his kindergarten program, materials and devices. The discovery of the kindergarten marked a new era in the history of the educational world. Though suppressed for years by government authority in Germany, and received with much suspicion elsewhere, the kindergarten has become an integral part of the public school system of many cities and States in our country. Its introduction into England was championed by Charles Dickens, and in America it found an advocate in the philosopher and educator Dr. William T. Harris. Concerning the kindergarten and the Montessori methods, Dr. P. P. Claxton, United States Commissioner of Education says: 'Though aims and principles are the same for both Froebel and Montessori, their different methods of approach have resulted in difference in emphasis, program and decides. For those who see no further than the form there is apparent conflict. Many cannot understand that the work of both Froebel and Montessori must finally lose each its distinctive characteristics in the larger whole of a more perfect knowledge of the nature of infancy and the means of educating young children.' It must be said of Dr. Montessori that she is first, last and always scientific in her work. Prolonged training in the sciences that relate to human life, vitalized by practical experience in their application to defective children, gave her a method which is the outcome of genius, training and experience. She swung into prominence, against her wish, in the following way: While serving as assistant doctor at the psychiatric clinic of the University of Rome, Italy, she founder herself differing from her colleagues in that she felt, as she says, 'that mental deficiency presented chiefly a pedagogic rather than mainly a medical problem.' The expression of these views in an address brought Dr. Montessori prominently before the Minister of Public Instruction, and her work from this on assumed a public character. Her belief that the methods employed with deficient children 'contained educational principles more rational than those in use and that if applied to normal children they would develop or set free their personality in a marvelous and surprising way,' became her controlling idea, and is the very heart of the Montessori system. The system of Mme. Montessori is indissolubly joined with her famous 'didactic material.' Among this will be found small wooden frames to which are attached pieces of cloth or leather on which are buttons and buttonholes, hooks and eyes, eyelets and lacing cords, and strings to be tied and untied. There are also boxes of cylindrical insets and other simple devices to develop 'man's mystery over nature.' Mme. Montessori is her best interpreter when she says, 'We are inclined to believe that children are like puppets and we wash them and feed them as if they were dolls. We do not stop to think that the child that does not do does not know how to do. Our duty is that of helping him to make a conquest of such useful acts as nature intended he should perform for himself. The mother who feeds her child without making the least effort to teach him to hold the spoon for himself and to try to find his mouth with it is not a wise mother. She treats her son as though he were a doll. We call an individual disciplined when he is master of himself and can regulate his own conduct when it shall be necessary to follow some rule of life. If any educational act is to be efficacious it is necessary rigorously to avoid the arrest of spontaneous movements and the imposition of arbitrary tasks. It is of course understood here that we do not speak of a useless or dangerous act; this must be suppressed, destroyed.' The Montessori doctrine is therefore in substance that the child's inner self or personalit cannot rightfully develop unless free to express itself undirected and unguided by another person. As a consequence Dr. Montessori insists that each child be allowed bodily freedom and have as much unhampered liberty of action as possible in order that he may fully express his inner life in outer activity. The classic illustration by which Dr. Montessori puts in concrete form her doctrine is the following: 'One day the children had gathered in a circle about a basin of water containing some floating toys. A little boy 2 1/2 years old had been left outside the circle. He drew near to the other children and tried to force his way among them, but he was not strong enough to do this. The expression of thought on his face was intensely interesting. His eyes then lighted upon a little chair and he had evidently made up his mind to place it behind the group of children and climb on it. As he began to move toward the chair, his face illuminated with hope, a teacher seized him in her arms, lifted him above the heads of the other children, showed him the basin of water, saying, 'Come poor little one you shall see too.' The child seeing the floating toys did not experience the joy that he was about to feel through conquering the obstacles with his own force. The teacher hindered the child in this case from educating himself. The little fellow was about to feel himself a conqueror, and instead he found himself held within two imprisoning arms impotent.' The now famous 'House of the Children' in Rome, under the patronage of Queen Margherita, faithfully reflects and demonstrates the Montessori principles and methods. It has been described as an old orphan asylum, whose gray outer walls give no idea of the two beautiful and luxuriant courtyards within. These latter are filled with beds of blossoming plans, and the pillars of the inner porch are covered with clinging vines. The schoolroom in which the class for the children is held opens with wide double doors into one of these lovely courtyards, where the children play during hours in which they are not engaged in their Montessori exercises. Miss Elizabeth Harrison, president of the National Kindergarten Union says of this 'House of the Children': 'On my first visit I found the children busy getting out the 'didactic material' with which they were to employ themselves for the next hour and a quarter. Some came forward to shake hands with me; some merely smiled and nodded and did not interrupt their work. All seemed busy, happy and free. I afterward saw as many as eighty visitors in the room where there were only a dozen children, but none of the children were in the least disturbed by or seemingly conscious of the presence of the visitors. Most of the children came from nearby tenement houses, yet even the youngest of them washed their own hands and faces, put on clean, neat calico aprons and looked as fresh and clean as children from well cared for homes.' Comparing the kindergarten and the Montessori systems, the following differences appear: The kindergarten stresses group activities, while the Montessori system emphasized almost exclusively the development of the individual. The kindergartners say that education in coordinating of muscles, the special training of the child's senses and all such phases of individual development are expected to come in the nursery. The Montessori system has no place for stories; the kindergartners are famous for them. Mme. Montessori objects to stories for young children on the theory that all activities of the mind are derived from the outside world and are dependent on sense impressions, and that therefore the child should be kept within the realm of his own personal experience until he is at least 7 or 8 years old. It is not necessary to add that two __ meet at this point of difference. The most remarkable features of the Montessori system, as well as one of its decided points of divergence from the kindergarten, lies in its ___ of definite attitude on religious training. Froebel, trained in an environment where instruction in religion is practically nationwide, says that while the child unconsciously manifests teh divine impuse within him he must follow it with conscious insights persisting in what he knows to do right and must needs have definite training of this kind. Montessori, on the other hand, with nuns as her assistants and attendants in her 'House of the Children,' acknowledges the importance of religious training for little children, 'but confesses that as yet it is an unsolved problem to her.' Miss Harrison, who spent some time in Rome with Mme. Montessori says, 'She [Montessori] seems to feel that a child's spiritual nature will ___ aright if freedom is given ....

Language: English

Book Section

The San Remo Lectures, 1949: Introduction

Book Title: Citizen of the World: Key Montessori Readings

Pages: 73

Conferences, Europe, International Montessori Congress (8th, San Remo, Italy, 22-29 August 1949), Italy, Southern Europe, Trainings

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Abstract/Notes: The 8th International Montessori Congress took place in San Remo, from 22-29 August, 1949. The title of the Congress was 'La formazione dell’uomo nella ricostruzione mondiale.'

Language: English

Published: Amsterdam, The Netherlands: Montessori Pierson Publishing Company, 2019

ISBN: 978-90-79506-44-6

Series: The Montessori Series , 14

Article

8th International Montessori Congress: Inaugural Speech

Publication: The Montessori Magazine: A Quarterly Journal for Teachers, Parents and Social Workers (India), vol. 3, no. 3-4

Pages: 4-7

Conferences, International Montessori Congress (8th, San Remo, Italy, 22-29 August 1949), Maria Montessori - Speeches, addresses, etc., Training, Trainings

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Abstract/Notes: Inaugural Speech at the VIIIth International Montessori Congress, San Remo, Italy, 22nd August, 1949.

Language: English

Book Section

Maria Montessori e l'India [Maria Montessori and India]

Book Title: Maria Montessori cittadina del mondo [Maria Montessori, citizen of the world]

Pages: 278-279

Asia, Conferences, India, International Montessori Congress (8th, San Remo, Italy, 22-29 August 1949), South Asia

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Abstract/Notes: Dal volume degli Atti dell'VIII Congresso Internazionale Montessori, svoltosi a S. Remo dal 22 al 29 agosto 1949 sul tema: "La formazione dell'uomo nella ricostruzione mondiale", edizione "Opera Montessori", Roma 1950, riportiamo il saluto augurale dell'Addetto culturale all'Ambasciata indiana di Roma, Madanjeet Singh. [From the volume of the Proceedings of the VIII Montessori International Congress, held in San Remo from 22 to 29 August 1949 on the theme: "The formation of man in world reconstruction", "Opera Montessori" edition, Rome 1950, we report the greeting of Cultural Attaché at the Indian Embassy in Rome, Madanjeet Singh.]

Language: Italian

Published: Roma: Comitato italiano dell'OMEP, 1967

Book

Aid to Life: Montessori Beyond the Classroom

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Abstract/Notes: In this book the author shares stories based on fifty years of Montessori work in thirty countries, first as a teacher of children from 2-13 in Montessori schools, then discovering new ways to use Montessori principles in a variety of situations—all aimed at inspiring, and providing practical ideas, to parents and teachers today. Here are some examples of her stories: preparing a group of elementary students in the Virgin Islands to run the class on their own; learning how to teach Montessori with no Montessori materials in a private girls school in Peru; applying Montessori in everyday situations by means of a Q and A newspaper column (twenty topics including self-esteem, preparing the home for a newborn, multiple intelligences, teenage troubles, homeschooling, and more); helping poor village children in a boarding school in Kathmandu, and blind children in Tibet; meeting with five other Montessori teachers, doctors, philosophers, educators, scientists, and the Dalai Lama in Sikkim to solve the country’s educational problems; visiting a school where Montessori helps severely disabled children and young adults in Russia; initiating a “first Year Montessori project” in an orphanage, helping village schools, and lecturing on the first Montessori 3-6 training course in Morocco. Susan shares two stories from a meeting of Educateurs sans Frontières in Thailand: Montessori help for mothers of babies born in prison, and for elders living with dementia.Enjoy the chapter describing the author and her husband reliving the book "Eloise in Paris." dictated by a four-year-old (used in the language area of some Montessori teacher training courses), and a detailed observation of a day in an authentic Montessori 3-6 class that is sure to inspire many teachers.Near the end of the book the author shares some of the solutions based on consultations with schools, and conversations with parents today, due to the unique situation of remote learning due to the pandemic. Age 0-6: Rather then recommending setting up mini-Montessori areas in the home which can cause even more stress for families, she gives suggestions on handling frustration and limited setting, welcoming the child into the daily work and activities of the family, understanding the value of protecting concentration, providing opportunities for children to be helpful and feel needed, and how to share the family ethics, morals, and even religions, in age-appropriate ways. Age 6-18: She explains the Montessori concepts of cosmic education and beginning the search for one’s cosmic task, so important at this age. She discusses homeschooling, the reasons and variety of methods, and her own experience of guiding her son’s self-chosen twelve years of homeschooling without materials or grades, but following interests.The last chapter, Stages of Development, the author explains how a Montessori education is completely different for birth-3, 3-6, 6-12, and 12-18. Rather then beginning with a desired standard academic curriculum, the learning is based on the needs and tendencies of human beings at different ages and planes, or stages, of development. As a result education becomes a joy. There are practical examples for parents and teachers.In the “Resources and Books” section, there are links to many of the projects described in the book, such as the school for the poor in Nepal. There are links to Montessori initiatives such as Educateurs sans Frontières she experienced in Thailand, Montessori for Dementia, the Montessori course for teaching adolescents, Montessori sports. There are also details about the author’s seven previous books, each one presenting Montessori in very practical examples from a unique perspective. Following Montessori principles can help anyone to dig deep and discover their inborn gifts, to gain the experience and confidence to push boundaries, to develop creative problem solving abilities, resilience, and compassion.

Language: English

Published: Arcata, California: Michael Olaf Montessori Company, 2021

ISBN: 978-1-879264-29-8

Thesis

Urgensi Pengembangan Kecerdasan Fisik Motorik Anak Usia Dini menurut Konsep Montessori [The Urgency of Early Childhood Physical Motor Intelligence Development According to the Montessori Concept]

Available from: State Islamic University of Sultan Syarif Kasim Riau (Indonesia)

Asia, Indonesia, Southeast Asia

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Abstract/Notes: Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui pengembangan kecerdasan fisik motorik anak usia dini menurut konsep Montessori. Latar belakang penelitian ini adalah pentingnya menegetahui pengembangan kecerdasan fisik motorik anak usia dini menurut konsep Montessori. Pengembangan fisik motorik bermanfaat untuk tumbuh kembang anak secara keseluruhan. Saat anak mampu mengkoordinasikan gerakan-gerakan otot di tubuhnya dengan optimal maka anak memiliki perkembangan kecerdasan fisik motorik yang baik. Konsep Montessori yang merupakan sebuah metode pendidikan oleh Maria Montessori. Montessori sebagai seorang ilmuwan, dokter dan juga seorang pendidik, menciptakan sebuah metode pendidikan yang memberikan kebebasan kepada anak didiknya. Penelitian ini menggunakan penelitian kepustakaan (library research). Sumber data pada penelitian kepustakaan ini terdiri dari sumber primer, sekunder dan tersier. Teknik pengumpulan data adalah dokumentasi. Teknik analisis data yang digunakan adalah teknik analisis isi (content analysis). Hasil penelitian ini menunjukkan bahwa pengembangan fisik motorik anak usia dini merupakan salah satu kecerdasan yang harus dikembangkan dalam diri anak dan konsep Montessori merupakan sebuah metode yang efektif untuk dilaksanakan. Dapat disimpulkan bahwa urgensi pengembangan kecerdasan fisik motorik anak usia dini menurut konsep Montessori merupakan hal yang penting bagi pendidikan anak usia dini. Pengembangan fisik motorik anak bermanfaat untuk tumbuh kembang anak secara keseluruhan, dengan konsep Montessori pengembangan kecerdasan Fisik Motorik anak usia dini hasilnya akan optimal sesuai dengan standar tingkat pencapaian perkembangan anak.

Language: Indonesian

Published: Pekanbaru City, Indonesia, 2022

Article

Türkiye’de Montessori Yöntemi ile İlgili Yapılan Çalışmaların İncelenmesi / Investigation of Studies on Montessori Method in Turkey

Available from: DergiPark Akademik

Publication: Yaşam Becerileri Psikoloji Dergisi / Life Skills Journal of Psychology, vol. 5, no. 10

Pages: 101-118

Asia, Literature reviews, Middle East, Turkey, Western Asia

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Abstract/Notes: Montessori Yöntemi, bir eğitim sistemidir ve Maria Montessori tarafından oluşturulmuştur. Maria Montessori İtalyan bir pedagog ve ülkesinin ilk kadın doktorudur. Montessori sistemi çocuğu merkeze alır ve çocuğa görelik ilkesiyle hareket ederek, çocuğa uygun oluşturulmuş bir çevreye dayanır. Çocuğun ilgi alanları ve yetenekleri dikkate alınarak, bireysel öğrenme hızının olduğunu kabul eder ve bunu temel alan esnek bir eğitim süreci oluşturur. Montessori yöntemi bir sentezdir; çocukların içlerindeki potansiyeli fark edip keşfetmelerini ve karakterlerini oluşturmalarını amaçlar. Ayrıca çocuğun içindeki potansiyele ulaşması için düzenlenmiş bir alana ve özgürlüğe ihtiyacı olduğunu savunur. Ülkemizde Montessori konusu ile ilgili bilimsel çalışmalara önem verildiği ve çalışmalarının son yıllarda arttığı gözlemlenmektedir. Bu araştırmada, ülkemizde Montessori metodu ve uygulamaları ile ilgili, 2010-2021 yılları arasında yazılan tez ve makaleler, belirlenen ölçütlere göre incelenerek, hem bu metodun güvenilirlik ve geçerliliğini görmek hem de yapılacak yeni araştırmalara fikir vermek amaçlanmıştır. Bu çalışma nitel bir araştırma olup, amaçsal öğrenme stratejilerinden ölçüt öğrenme yöntemi ve doküman tarama (analizi) tekniği kullanılmıştır. Google Akademi, Dergipark ve Ulusal Tez Merkezi veri ortamlarından “montessori” kelimeleri ile kaynaklar taranmış ve 48 tez çalışması, 36 makale çalışması olmak üzere toplam da 84 çalışmaya ulaşılmıştır. Araştırmadan elde edilen bulgulara bakıldığında; ülkemizde Montessori metoduna yönelik çalışmalarının yoğunluğunun son 5 yıla ait olduğu saptanmıştır. Araştırmaların büyük bir bölümünün okul öncesi kademesinde yapıldığı söylenebilir. Yapılan çalışmaların tamamına yakınının sonuç bölümlerinde, Montessori yöntemi ile eğitim alan çocukların lehine değişim gözlendiği belirtilmiştir. / The Montessori Method is an education system and was created by Maria Montessori. Maria Montessori is an Italian pedagogue and the first female doctor in her country. The Montessori system puts the child in the center and, acting on the principle of relative to the child, is based on an environment created suitable for the child. Considering the interests and abilities of the child, it accepts the individual learning speed and creates a flexible education process based on this. The Montessori method is a synthesis; It aims for children to realize and discover the potential within them and to create their characters. He also argues that the child needs a regulated space and freedom to reach their potential. It is observed that scientific studies on the subject of Montessori are given importance in our country and their studies have increased in recent years. In this study, it is aimed to see the reliability and validity of this method and to give an idea for new researches by examining the theses and articles written between 2010-2021 about the Montessori method and its applications in our country, according to the determined criteria. This study is a qualitative research and criterion learning method and document scanning (analysis) technique, which are purposeful learning strategies, were used. Sources were scanned with the words "montessori" from Google Academy, Dergipark and National Thesis Center data environments, and a total of 84 studies, including 48 thesis studies and 36 article studies, were reached. Considering the findings obtained from the research; It has been determined that the intensity of the studies on the Montessori method in our country belongs to the last 5 years. It can be said that most of the studies were conducted at the preschool level. In the conclusion sections of almost all of the studies, it was stated that a change was observed in favor of the children who received education with the Montessori method.

Language: Turkish

DOI: 10.31461/ybpd.1026936

ISSN: 2587-1536

Book

Die Montessori-Pädagogik und das behinderte Kind: Referate und Ergebnisse des 18. Internationalen Montessori Kongresses (München, 4-8 Juli 1977) [Montessori Pedagogy and the Handicapped Child: Papers and Results of the 18th International Montessori Congress (Munich, July 4-8, 1977)]

Children with disabilities, Conferences, International Montessori Congress (18th, Munich, Germany, 4-8 July 1977)

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Language: German

Published: München: Kindler, 1978

ISBN: 3-463-00716-9

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