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1261 results

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Immersion and Identity: Experiences of an African American Preschool Child

Available from: International Journal of Multicultural Education

Publication: International Journal of Multicultural Education, vol. 12, no. 2

African American community, African Americans, Americas, Bilingualism, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: This article explores the benefits and challenges of a Spanish language immersion preschool from the perspective of a non-Spanish speaking African American family.  Data explored include the decision to enroll, reactions from peers and family, home-school communication issues, language development, and family involvement.  In addition, recommendations for families considering this bilingual option are considered. The primary data used for this article come from 127 journal entries written by the mother of the child from the beginning of the preschool admissions process until the end of preschool.

Language: English

DOI: 10.18251/ijme.v12i2.306

ISSN: 1934-5267

Article

Americans Are Given Praise By Educator

Available from: California Digital Newspaper Collection

Publication: Los Angeles Herald (Los Angeles, California)

Pages: 1

Americas, Maria Montessori - Biographic sources, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: "AMERICANS ARE GIVEN PRAISE Of EDUCATOR. With the intention of establishing four great Montessori schools in California, Dr. Maria Montessori, founder of the educational system that bears her name and world famous for her intellectual achievements, today declared that Americans are more fitted for the work of advancing educational work than any other people. Dr. Montessori is established at the Maryland hotel, Pasadena, where she will make her headquarters during her visit here. One of her schools will be in Pasadena, one in Los Angeles, one in San Diego and the other in San Francisco, and all who attend to learn the famous Montessori technique will be sent from one to the other institution, to avoid routine and bo,t ways. AMERICANS PRAISED "Americans seem more interested In their young than do people of other countries, ’ Madame Montessori declared, through her interpreter, "and they are also more alert. It Is for these reasons that they embrace and develope more quickly what Is for the child's benefit. "My system Is still too new to show positive results," she continued, “but It Is founded on the desire to secure the same Justice for the child that the adult would have, and to d&relop only what Is good In child nature. CHILD BORN GOOD "A child Is born Into the world good. What it develops of wrong doing Is taught It by adults. If left to follow Its original instincts and desires it would be and do only good. 'By encouraging a child to know the Joy of right doing It will never want to do wrong. If a child's parents and teachers never give It wrong precepts It will not be guilty of wrong doing, for the Innocence of child nature is Ignorant of evil till that Is taught from the outside.'"

Language: English

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Community Action Plans for Social Justice Advocacy: Leveraging the Relationship Between Awareness and Action

Available from: Wiley Online Library

Publication: TESOL Journal, vol. 11, no. 4

Pages: e552

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Abstract/Notes: Supporting multilingual learners’ access to equitable and socially just language education requires more from teachers than a critical stance and language awareness. Teachers of multilingual students must understand how their awareness and ideologies drive their actions and how their actions can generate new awareness both inside the classroom in pedagogical choices and outside the classroom in interactions with families and community partners. To aid teachers in moving through cycles of applying awareness to action, the authors designed the Community Action Plan (CAP) assignment for a family and community engagement course. This article outlines the components of the course curriculum and the conceptual framework that guided its design. The authors also provide a case study of how one novice teacher, Katrina (co-author), navigated the curriculum. They offer suggestions for how language teacher educators might guide in-service and preservice teachers to implement CAPs of various types to promote socially just language education for and with K–12 learners.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1002/tesj.552

ISSN: 1949-3533

Article

Applying Montessori Theory to Break the Cycle of Poverty: A Unique Multi-Generational Model of Transforming Housing, Education, and Community for At-Risk Families

Available from: ERIC

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 39, no. 2

Pages: 103-110

Crossway Community Montessori School, Early childhood education, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: The authors accept urban reform as their main calling with their aim being to break the poverty cycle with a multi-faceted, educational, and family-centered approach. The authors speak about providing a broad range of education programs and social services including low-cost housing in comfortable apartments for single mothers, early childhood educational programs, adult education programs, career coaching and job skills training, family support referrals, a home visitation program, a children's garden, whole-family practical-life orientation, and a community center. [This talk was presented at the NAMTA conference titled: "Montessori from Birth to Six: In Search of Community Values," Minneapolis, MN, November 7-10, 2013.]

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

Music, Community, and Cooperation in a Lower Elementary Classroom

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research, Lower elementary, Montessori method of education

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Abstract/Notes: The following research assesses how daily singing and music in an elementary classroom impacted the sense of community, care of materials and cooperation during clean up time. This study involved daily singing of a set of songs with lyrical themes of cooperation and unity, and then playing of recorded versions of the same songs during clean up time. The eight-week study involved 16 participants between the ages of 6 and 9 at a private school in Minnesota. Each individual completed a pre and post-survey. During clean up time, observations of helpful behaviors were recorded, and any relevant quotations noted. Results of the surveys showed an increase in student enjoyment of group singing, and in the understanding of the terms “cooperation” and “community.” There was also an increase in observed helpful behaviors throughout the intervention, particularly in material care. Results show that daily group singing has a positive affect on building community, and increases cooperation levels while caring for materials. Further research may include using group singing to teach other topics such as environmental care, racial equality or academic subject matter.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2016

Article

Bringing Montessori to the Black Community: A Private School Model

Publication: NAMTA Quarterly, vol. 6, no. 2

Pages: 13-17

African American community, African Americans, Americas, North America, Montessori schools, North America, United States of America

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Language: English

Doctoral Dissertation

Education as a Tool for Social Change: Case Study of an Arizona Inner-City Charter School

Available from: University of San Francisco

Social transformation

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Abstract/Notes: It is a very difficult task to provide adequate education in the United States for children living in an inner-city environment, with problems of poverty, minority status, drugs, crime, gangs, suicide, despair, and many single-parent households. This is a Case Study of how one Arizona inner-city poverty community has risen to answer these educational demands for its children through a Montessori theory-based Charter Pre-12 school. The 650 student population served in this school is approximately 80% Hispanic American, 12% African American, and 8% Native, Asian and European American. Data were gathered from extensive interviews, observations, and document analysis. They were analyzed and evaluated in three ways: first, according to a literature review of the educational theories of Maria Montessori, then according to those of Paulo Freire, and lastly, according to a review of Charter school books, articles, and government documents available up to January of 2000. The results were an in-depth description of first, the history of this community's needs, its struggle to establish and fund the school, then the resulting educational program which it developed and implemented, and lastly, the community's positive evaluation of it's efforts. The curriculum described had extensive use of ESL and cultural appreciation programs, hands-on student initiated and student-implemented programs, integrated curriculum and critical thinking programs, job-skills related programs, self-esteem and character development programs, and Sustainable Systems Ecology Education demonstration programs. All these findings were presented in a manner which could be useful to other Administrators, who might desire to use this school's example to begin or to improve their own programs for a similarly disadvantaged inner-city population. Conclusions were that after five years of operation, this community empowerment school has indeed found methods, curriculum and programs that have successfully helped to meet the emotional, cultural, moral, and educational needs of the children in this particular poverty community. Conclusions were also that this community's experiences are valuable and appropriate for examination by other prospective Charter school Administrators from similar communities.

Language: English

Published: San Francisco, California, 2000

Article

Establishing an American Montessori Movement: Another Look at the Early Years

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 18, no. 2

Pages: 44-49

Americas, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Montessori method of education - History, North America, United States of America, ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Though Montessorians have existed in the United States for nearly a century, a distinctly American version of the system did not begin to take hold until the late 1950s. What was referred to at the time as the "second spring" was actually a remarkable moment not just for Montessori education, but also for American culture at large. For the Montessori movement, the years 1959 to 1963 witnessed rapid growth, turmoil, and the establishment of educational, political, and ideological patterns that still influence the movement today. In this article, the authors trace what happened in those years, why it happened, and the impact those events had on the subsequent development of Montessori education in the United States as they look at the historical context surrounding those events in order to provide a richer understanding of the origins of the American Montessori identity. A closer look at the early years of the movement reveals a complex story of two strong personalities, Mario Montessori and Nancy McCormick Rambusch, who shared a deep commitment to the Montessori ideal, and who squabbled endlessly over how to realize that ideal.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Archival Material Or Collection

American Montessori Society Records, 1907-2015

Available from: University of Connecticut Libraries - American Montessori Society Records

American Montessori Society (AMS) - History, Americas, Montessori method of education, Montessori organizations - United States of America, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: The American Montessori Society (AMS) Records document the history of an important American educational organization, and consist of printed, typescript, and handwritten materials; sound recordings; films; photographs; and slides. The collection, although not complete, reflects AMS's professional and administrative activities and also provides historical information about the Montessori system of education in general.

Language: English

Extent: 76 linear feet

Archive: Archives and Special Collections at the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center, University of Connecticut Library (Mansfield, Connecticut)

Doctoral Dissertation

American Writings on Maria Montessori: An Inquiry into Changes in the Reception and Interpretations Given to Writings on Maria Montessori and Montessori Educational Ideas 1910-1915 and 1958-1970

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

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Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this dissertation will be to survey and analyze American writings on Maria Montessori and her educational system, in order to show how the idea of Montessori education has interacted with some changing American ideas and social forces. These changes in social and intellectual currents can be likened to a shift from centrifugal to centripetal force; or to the expansion and then the contraction of a universe. The central metaphor is the same. It is applicable to, and illustrative of, much about the changing social and educational scene in America. The writings on Montessori, examined against this framework, should provide a new view on certain changes in American educational thinking.

Language: English

Published: Kent, Ohio, 1973

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