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89 results

Doctoral Dissertation (Ed.D.)

Literacy Achievement in Nongraded Classrooms

Available from: ProQuest - Dissertations and Theses

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Abstract/Notes: This longitudinal quantitative study compared literacy achievement of students from second through sixth grade based on two organizational systems: graded (traditional) and nongraded (multiage) classrooms. The California Standards Test (CST) scaled and proficiency scores for English-Language Arts (ELA) were used as the study's independent variable to measure student performance. A matched control was utilized in which nongraded students were compared with graded students based on gender, ethnicity, and date of birth. Data analysis included independent samples t-test, analysis of variance (ANOVA), and effect size. Results showed that nongraded students had a significant advantage over their graded counterparts in literacy achievement (p=0.000). Effect size for the matched group increased with length of exposure in the nongraded program from Cohen's d=0.49 to d=0.99. It is difficult to determine if significant outcomes were the result of classroom structure or instructional strategies used in the nongraded setting. However, a unique quality of this study involves the rare conditions and matched control design that allowed for variables to be controlled, which have yet to be simultaneously accounted for in multiage studies to date. Based on the results, this study suggested that nongraded education, by responding to the developmental nature of children in the classroom, may offer a viable alternative to the graded system. In nations such as Australia, New Zealand, Netherlands, Finland, and Canada with the highest literacy rates in the world, nongraded classrooms are common educational practice.

Language: English

Published: Los Angeles, California, 2011

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

Literacy in Kindergarten: Using the Montessori Method in Combination with the Daily 5 Method

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

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Abstract/Notes: This action research project was conducted to investigate the impact of merging the literacy program The Daily 5 with the Montessori Method of reading instruction. This project was intended to study the independent reading stamina of the students. It was conducted in a public Montessori School with kindergarten aged students from an early childhood classroom. There were 13 students participating, six girls and seven boys. Pre-assessment data was gathered in the forms of a parent survey and a baseline student reading assessment. Student stamina was recorded on a daily log and student reflections were recorded once a week. After the project was complete, the parents and students were surveyed for final reflection. The results show that when students are able to choose their own books, their stamina for reading improves. More research needs to be done to investigate the impact of the other four areas from the Daily 5 model in combination with Montessori Literacy.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2013

Article

Putting the Discovery Back Into Montessori Language and Literacy

Publication: Montessori NewZ, vol. 34

Pages: 11–12

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Language: English

Bachelor's Thesis

Benefits of Using the Montessori Method to Teach Literacy to TK-2

Available from: California State University, Monterey Bay

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Abstract/Notes: The focus of this senior capstone is to examine the benefits of using the Montessori method to teach literacy to TK-2 grade children. This encompasses children ranging from ages four to eight. Through the use of literature review on how the Montessori method developed, reviews of records, and interviews with Montessori professionals, the result findings indicate that the use of the Montessori method to teach literacy does indeed benefit TK-2 children. In addition, children educated in the Montessori method have a deeper understanding of literacy and possess the knowledge and skills of reading and writing when introducing the concepts of print to them than those taught in traditional methods.

Language: English

Published: Seaside, California, 2023

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

The Impact of Read Aloud with Socratic Discussion on the Literacy and Critical Thinking Skills of the Elementary Student

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

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Abstract/Notes: This study aims to uncover a link between read aloud with Socratic discussion and its impact on literacy and critical thinking skills. In researching this relationship, both quantitative and qualitative data tools were used. Participants in the study included 60 students from a charter Montessori school in the Southwest United States ranging from grade 1 to 6. Students participated in a six-week intervention. The intervention included a 60-minute read aloud with Socratic discussion session conducted twice a week. The findings indicate that there is a general increase in literacy and reading comprehension skills. In addition, the study was also shown to have a significant impact on individual participation and critical thinking skills as it relates to themes of the book. The conclusion of the study recommends more research with varied communities and book choices. In the future we must find ways to stimulate critical thinking skills in the elementary child using relatable themes and critical questioning.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2020

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

Cultivating Toddler Emergent Literacy Behaviors Using the Montessori Sandpaper Letters

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

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Abstract/Notes: The Montessori Sandpaper Letters are a powerful, multi-sensory tool which can cultivate emergent literacy behaviors. A half-day Montessori classroom of 17 students between the ages of 2.4 years old and 3.5 years old in a private, accredited, suburban Montessori school participated in this action research study. Participants completed a four-week intervention that implemented daily use of the Sandpaper Letters. Data was collected through daily observations, tally charts, individual lesson logs, and a modified pre- and post-assessment of the ability to identify letter sounds. Thirteen out of 17 participants, or 76%, showed an increase in letter sound identification. In addition there was a significant increase in the number of child-initiated Sandpaper Letter lessons (as opposed to adult-initiated lessons). Also seen was an advancement of the children’s language skills from concrete to symbolic. This included the advent of writing, and the spontaneous appearance of activities demonstrating both phonological and phonemic awareness. These activities related directly to the Sandpaper Letters and demonstrated new and significant emergent literacy behaviors.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2020

Article

Early literacy in the Montessori toddler setting: Supporting learning through the sensitive periods

Publication: Montessori Leadership, vol. 15, no. 2

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Language: English

Article

Discovering Children: Developing an Observational Literacy

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 3, no. 4

Pages: 27–28

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Abstract/Notes: Part 2 of 4

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Discovering Children: Developing an Observational Literacy

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 4, no. 1

Pages: 13–14

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Abstract/Notes: Part 3 of 4

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Discovering Children: Developing an Observational Literacy

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 4, no. 2

Pages: 14–15, 21

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Abstract/Notes: Part 4 of 4

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

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