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609 results

Article

N.C.M.E. Elementary Training, Amarillo, Texas and Lessons Given to Elementary Montessori Children

Publication: The National Montessori Reporter

Pages: 8–9

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Language: English

Article

Elementary: California Gathering Again Lifts Vision and Practice of Classroom Teachers [Experienced Montessori Elementary Symposium, March, 2000, Monterey Bay, California]

Available from: University of Connecticut Libraries - American Montessori Society Records

Publication: Public School Montessorian, vol. 12, no. 4

Pages: 23

Public Montessori

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Language: English

Doctoral Dissertation

Examining the Transition Experience of Students from Multiage Elementary Programs to Single-Grade Classrooms at the Middle School

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

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Abstract/Notes: Multiage programming is a school reform option used throughout the United States. Much of the current literature focuses on the short-term benefits of multiage programs, particularly at the elementary level, with little consideration for long-term effects or for what might happen to students once they leave the multiage classroom and enter middle school. While there has been significant research that generalizes the transition experience of the general population of students, there has been limited research conducted on this transition experience for this specific population, the multiage elementary student. The purpose of this simultaneous, mixed methods study was to provide an in-depth examination of the transition effects on students who transition from multiage elementary classrooms to traditional single-grade classrooms at the middle school. In this study, eight students who had previously attended multiage elementary classrooms were given the Piers-Harris 2 Children's Self Concept Scale at three points, fall, winter, and spring during their first year in middle school to assess the students' social and emotional well-being during the transition. Students were also administered a middle school transition questionnaire to identify what procedural, academic, or social issues were of concern to them. Students were interviewed about their transitional experiences. In the analysis of the data showed that the students' overall sense of self and self-esteem improved over the course of the transitional year. Student concerns with procedures, academics, and social life decreased over the course of the year. The following major categories emerged from the interviews: (a) adjusting to the structure of middle school, (b) adjusting to new academic demands, (c) managing relationships with teachers and peers, and (d) changing sense of self. The findings have implications for middle level educators, multiage classroom elementary educators and for parents.

Language: English

Published: Chicago, Illinois, 2012

Article

A Visit to a Montessori Elementary Class in Israel

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 18, no. 4

Pages: 26-28

Cooperation, Cultural background, Educational environment, Educational Environment, Elementary school students, Elementary schools, Foreign Countries, Israel, Teamwork, ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: The author of this article describes her week observing a Montessori class in the Adam Vesviva School at Kibbutz Ga'ash, located on the outskirts of Tel Aviv. The headmaster of the school, Yariv Ya'ari, had previously been associated with Democratic Schools, an alternate to the public educational system, whose philosophy was established at Adam Vesviva. This approach has at its center respect, independence and child-centered learning. The article relates how impressed she was by the independence and mutual respect of the children and the wonderful cooperation among the faculty. She found the headmaster to be an excellent role model and advocate for Montessori education. Children and seniors enjoyed their meals together in the kibbutz dining hall in a wonderful example of intergenerational socialization and cooperation. The elementary room resembles any class in the United States, except that all the work done at Adam Vesviva is in Hebrew. Seeing a well-designed fort built by two 10-year-old boys, and recalling the same project by boys in her 9-12 class in America was a reminder of Montessori's understanding of the universality of the planes of development. The author was touched when some children, who were learning English, invited her to a special presentation of her book, "A Little Book of Peace." The children and teachers at Adam Vesviva put much importance on the value of cultural studies that included all members of the human family, often focusing on the importance of shared cultural heritage. The operation of a Montessori elementary class within the Adam Vesviva School is a work in progress, and the faculty is becoming familiar with the Montessori philosophy.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

A Toddler Mentor Program with Elementary Students to Improve the Development of Empathy

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

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Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this action research project was to determine if there would be improved development of empathy in elementary students as a result of involvement in the Toddler Mentor Program. The study took place in a 6-9 year Montessori Elementary Classroom. There were eight participants, which were first and second year students in the classroom. The age range was 6-7 years old. The elementary students spent twenty minutes as a mentor in the Toddler classroom once a week. Data was collected by teacher observation pre, during and post project in three different environments, the elementary classroom, the toddler classroom and recess. The students were interviewed following all visits of the toddler classroom and also participated in group discussions. The results showed an increase in empathetic behaviors over the time as a whole group. Individually, the girls displayed consistent empathy in the toddler classroom and the boys showed the most improvement over time. In conclusion, the Toddler Mentor Program provided the students the opportunity to focus on social-emotional skills such as being helpful, kind, respectful, and acknowledging other’s feelings. In order to identify long-term effects outside the classroom more research is recommended.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2015

Article

The Challenge of Teaching Elementary Reading

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 18, no. 1

Pages: 38-45

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: In this article, Aline Wolf discusses the challenges of teaching elementary reading at present time. She also raises her concern not only about the declining of reading skills, but also about the declining number of books that students actually read which creates a dilemma for teachers. She believes that the Montessori community must give priority to eliminating current deficiencies in reading. In brainstorming sessions, workshops, staff meetings, and professional Montessori consultations, she feels that Montessorians must grapple with these problems and decide on creative solutions consistent with Montessori traditions. One strategy she suggests is Elementary training courses, if they have not already done so, can adjust their curriculum to incorporate Montessori strategies for nonreaders at the elementary level. The very valuable exercise of word building can be upgraded for 6-and 7-year-olds. Phonetic readers can be found with higher interest content. The author argues that for developing readers educators should ask if the methods being used respect each child's individual interests. Does it meet his or her particular needs, whether for more help with phonograms or for a wider variety of challenging books? Does this new strategy lead each student to a love of reading? Does it weigh down the burgeoning reader with dubious tasks that usurp the time for actually reading books? In attempts to improve reading in elementary classes teachers should be certain that any procedures decided upon are in keeping with the cherished techniques that have distinguished Montessori education for over a century.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

The Effect of Montessori Teaching Method on Self-Concept and Motivation in Elementary First- Grade Students of Tabriz

Available from: Journal of Instruction and Evaluation

Publication: Journal of Instruction and Evaluation / Amuzish va Arzishyabi, vol. 12, no. 45

Pages: 31-50

Asia, Iran, Middle East, South Asia

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Abstract/Notes: The aim of this study was to determine the effect of teaching Montessori Method on self–concept and motivation of elementary first-grade students in Tabriz. Information was collected on the basis of semi-experimental pretest-posttest research with control group. The population consists of all elementary first grade male students of Tabriz which were 665 schools in 2015-2016 school years. The sample includes 40 primary school pupils (20 in the experimental group and students 20 in the control group) who were selected by multistage cluster random sampling. To collect data, self-motivation Liu, Wang and Parkyn’s questionnaire was used to assess self-concept and motivation for preschool and elementary school age groups. The Montessori method teaching sessions (40 sessions) were conducted on the experimental group and the control group was exposed to traditional and traditional education. After holding Montessori classes sessions and analyzing data with Covariance method, results showed that teaching Montessori Method has been effective on self-concept and motivation of elementary school students. And this method has been able to boost self-image and increase motivation in male students.

Language: Persian

DOI: 10.30495/JINEV.2019.665916

ISSN: 2345-6299, 2476-5627

Conference Paper

Positive Socialization in an Educational Inclusion Group of a Montessori Elementary School

Available from: IATED Digital Library

8th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies

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Abstract/Notes: The purpose of the present work was to foster positive socialization in a multilevel group of a Montessori elementary school comprised by 20 students between 9 and 12 years old and many students with Special Education Needs. Positive socialization refers to the group of behaviors to aid the more vulnerable and concern for the others (Rudolph, 2000). It is important to nurture these behaviors during the school age since this is the stage where students require them to foster healthy coexistence and cooperation, as well as respect for differences and diversity among peers, which is closely related to educational inclusion, which premise is to make a school for all, for which the creation of spaces where coexistence and differences acceptance are nurtured taking into account the needs of each student (Romera, 2008). The Elementary Education Syllabus in Mexico mentions the inclusion principle, which emphasizes the teaching of values, attitudes and behaviors towards helping the others (Secretary of Public Education, 2011). Under this perspective, a traditional empirical quantitative applied field study was conducted. The design was of only one group, with two pretest-posttest measurings in which also 5 teachers participated in the group activities. The group was assessed in Positive socialization by means of the Socialization Battery BAS-3 by Silva and Martorell (1987) which defines a child’s profile by five factors. The pretest results indicated five subjects obtained a scoring below the mean value in the Concern for the others scale, this meant the subjects had little social sensitivity or concern for others. In addition, the Inclusive Practices in the Classroom Evaluation Guideline in its observation and self-report version by Garcia, Romero and Escalante (2009) was applied, which allowed to measure the levels of educational inclusion in the group. The results determined that four teachers obtained a scoring below the mean value in the planning area scale. Based on the pretest results obtained from both instruments, an intervention program was designed based on the Cooperative play proposal by Garaigordobil (2004), to foster prosocial behaviors, while the decision taking according to the students’ needs were worked with the teachers. At the end of the intervention, a posttest was applied to the group and the results indicated a significant increment in the positive socialization, especially, the behaviors towards helping the others in the students with the lowest scores from the pretest; teachers planning also improved to achieve a more inclusive environment in the group. The results were validated with the non-parametric Wilcoxon test using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) software.

Language: English

Published: Barcelona, Spain: International Academy of Technology, Education and Development (IATED), 2016

Pages: 7934-7941

DOI: 10.21125/edulearn.2016.0741

ISBN: 978-84-608-8860-4

Article

The State of Geographic Education in Selected Elementary Schools in Metro Manila, Philippines

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: International Research in Geographical and Environmental Education, vol. 17, no. 4

Pages: 344-357

Asia, Philippines, Southeast Asia

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Abstract/Notes: The article presents the state of geographic education in Manila, Philippines by examining the types of approaches in teaching geography in public, private and Montessori schools. As part of the social studies programme in Grade IV elementary education, the types of approaches to teaching geography are examined for their effectiveness and relevance to teaching geographic concepts. Two curricular programmes were considered in the assessment of the importance of using the right kind of instructional materials in learning geographic concepts in elementary education. These programmes are (a) the basic education curriculum (BEC) that is prescribed by the Department of Education and (b) the curriculum followed by the Montessori education philosophy. Initial findings indicate that there was a significant difference in the achievement scores of Old Balara Elementary School (public) and Seed Montessori with that of Roosevelt Elementary School (private). While achievement scores were higher when instructional materials were readily available to students, this does not necessarily mean that the availability of instructional materials by itself is the key in the attainment of high scores. The content must be anchored on the local setting where students have their immediate experience in order for achievement scores to improve. This study provides a tentative first look at the implications of curriculum and instructional material for educators, school authorities and government policymakers in strengthening and reorienting geographic education under the social studies programme in the Philippine context.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1080/10382040802560402

ISSN: 1038-2046

Book

Process Versus Content in Elementary School Science Teaching

Available from: ERIC

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Abstract/Notes: The purpose of the monograph was to determine if the process of science or the content of science should be emphasized in elementary school science teaching. The discussion attempts to show why process, and not content, should be the primary emphasis in elementary school science teaching by examining the history of elementary school science in the United States, cognitive development, and the preparation of teachers. The results indicate that educators regard the development of competence in use of the scientific method and the development of the scientific attitude the most important objectives of science instruction. Developmental psychologists such as Montessori, Piaget, and Bruner believe that child cognition is enhanced when pupils use the processes of science. Finally, there is evidence that elementary school teachers can be better trained to teach a process-oriented curriculum because it requires little understanding of the concepts and principles of science and does not require teachers to keep up to date with scientific information. (Author/BR)

Language: English

Published: Syracuse, New York: Department of Science Teaching, Syracuse University, 1973

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