Quick Search
For faster results please use our Quick Search engine.

Advanced Search

Search across titles, abstracts, authors, and keywords.
Advanced Search Guide.

640 results

Conference Paper

Academic Achievement Outcomes: Montessori and Non-Montessori Public Elementary Students

Available from: Semantic Scholar

See More

Language: English

Article

What? No Grades? Understanding Academic Achievement in Montessori Classrooms

Publication: Tomorrow's Child, vol. 17, no. 1

Pages: 5–8, 23, 26–27

See More

Language: English

ISSN: 1071-6246

A Comparison of Academic Achievement for Seventh Grade and Eighth Grade Students from Montessori and Non-Montessori School Programs

See More

Language: English

Published: Stephenville, Texas, 2011

Report

Effects of Type of Preschool Experience and Socioeconomic Class on Academic Achievement Motivation. Final Report

Available from: ERIC

See More

Abstract/Notes: Four experiments were designed to identify socioeconomic differences in preschool locus of control, develop a measurement technique for differentiating between internal and external locus of control in preschoolers, and study the effect of four kinds of preschool programs on locus of control. During the first experiment, the Stephens-Delys Reinforcement Contingency Interview (SDRCI) was developed to assess internal locus of control development in preschoolers. When used with 24 4-year-olds in a Head Start program, the measure was found to have rater and retest reliability; the race of the interviewer did not significantly affect scores. The second experiment indicated that the performance of 32 preschool boys on a mirror-tracing task was positively related to internal locus of control as measured by the SDRCI. In the third study, investigators tested 55 Head Start preschoolers and 50 middle-class nursery school children with the SDRCI. Lower internal control scores were found for the Head Start children than for the middle-class nursery school group; no differences were found between black and white Head Start groups. A final study of 114 children found a nonsignificant tendency for Montessori preschool experience (and to a lesser extent, parent cooperative nursery school experience) to increase internal control, as measured by the SDRCI, more than Head Start or a more structured compensatory preschool program. (Author/BRT)

Language: English

Published: West Lafayette, Indiana, Aug 1973

Article

Montessori Preschool Elevates and Equalizes Child Outcomes: A Longitudinal Study

Available from: Frontiers in Psychology

Publication: Frontiers in Psychology, vol. 8

Pages: 1-19

Academic achievement, Americas, Cognitive development, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Longitudinal studies, Montessori method of education, North America, Philosophy of mind, United States of America

See More

Abstract/Notes: Quality preschool programs that develop the whole child through age-appropriate socioemotional and cognitive skill-building hold promise for significantly improving child outcomes. However, preschool programs tend to either be teacher-led and didactic, or else to lack academic content. One preschool model that involves both child-directed, freely chosen activity and academic content is Montessori. Here we report a longitudinal study that took advantage of randomized lottery-based admission to two public Montessori magnet schools in a high-poverty American city. The final sample included 141 children, 70 in Montessori and 71 in other schools, most of whom were tested 4 times over 3 years, from the first semester to the end of preschool (ages 3 to 6), on a variety of cognitive and socio-emotional measures. Montessori preschool elevated children's outcomes in several ways. Although not different at the first test point, over time the Montessori children fared better on measures of academic achievement, social understanding, and mastery orientation, and they also reported relatively more liking of scholastic tasks. They also scored higher on executive function when they were 4. In addition to elevating overall performance on these measures, Montessori preschool also equalized outcomes among subgroups that typically have unequal outcomes. First, the difference in academic achievement between lower income Montessori and higher income conventionally schooled children was smaller at each time point, and was not (statistically speaking) significantly different at the end of the study. Second, defying the typical finding that executive function predicts academic achievement, in Montessori classrooms children with lower executive function scored as well on academic achievement as those with higher executive function. This suggests that Montessori preschool has potential to elevate and equalize important outcomes, and a larger study of public Montessori preschools is warranted.

Language: English

DOI: 10.3389/fpsyg.2017.01783

ISSN: 1664-1078

Article

Experimental Evaluation of the Effects of a Research-Based Preschool Mathematics Curriculum

Available from: SAGE Journals

Publication: American Educational Research Journal, vol. 45, no. 2

Pages: 443-494

See More

Abstract/Notes: A randomized-trials design was used to evaluate the effectiveness of a preschool mathematics program based on a comprehensive model of research-based curricula development. Thirty-six preschool classrooms were assigned to experimental (Building Blocks), comparison (a different preschool mathematics curriculum), or control conditions. Children were individually pre-and posttested, participating in 26 weeks of instruction in between. Observational measures indicated that the curricula were implemented with fidelity, and the experimental condition had significant positive effects on classrooms' mathematics environment and teaching. The experimental group score increased significantly more than the comparison group score (effect size = 0.47) and the control group score (effect size = 1.07). Early interventions can increase the quality of the mathematics environment and help preschoolers develop a foundation of mathematics knowledge.

Language: English

DOI: 10.3102/0002831207312908

ISSN: 0002-8312, 1935-1011

Article

Using Mathematics Strategies in Early Childhood Education as a Basis for Culturally Responsive Teaching in India

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: International Journal of Early Years Education, vol. 14, no. 1

Pages: 15-34

Asia, Culturally relevant pedagogy, India, South Asia

See More

Abstract/Notes: The objective of this small study was to elicit responses from early childhood teachers in India on mathematics learning strategies and to measure the extent of finger counting technique adopted by the teachers in teaching young children. Specifically, the research focused on the effective ways of teaching mathematics to children in India, and examined teachers’ approach to number counting. In India, children were taught by their parents or by their teachers to use fingers to count. The qualitative study conducted by the researcher further enriched the topic with first‐hand comments by the teachers. Although the finger counting method was not the only process that teachers would adopt, it was embedded in the culture and taken into consideration while infusing mathematics skills. The teachers confirmed adopting the Indian method of finger counting in their teaching strategy; some specified that the method helped children to undertake addition and subtraction of carrying and borrowing, as counting by objects could not be available all the time. Although the study is limited by its small sample to the unique mathematics learning experience in India, it provides readers with a glimpse of culturally responsive teaching methods and an alternative mathematics teaching strategy.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1080/09669760500446374

ISSN: 0966-9760

Article

Teaching Mathematics in a Multiage Classroom

Publication: Dimensions of Early Childhood, vol. 27, no. 3

Pages: 3-10

Classroom environment, Mathematics - Achievement, Mathematics education, Mathematics education, ⛔ No DOI found

See More

Abstract/Notes: Multiage grouping, based on the belief that children benefit from engaging in learning environments that accommodate at least two age groups, allows for marked improvements in children's enthusiasm for learning mathematics. Children are challenged and stimulated by their interactions with multiage peers, and assessment information indicates they are developing mathematical sense, skills, and concepts from their experiences. (LBT)

Language: English

ISSN: 1068-6177

Article

Math Achievement Outcomes Associated with Montessori Education

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: Early Child Development and Care, vol. 191, no. 7/8 (Early Childhood Theorists and Pioneers)

Pages: 1207-1218

Academic achievement, Angeline Stoll Lillard - Writings, Mathematics education - Achievement, Montessori materials, Montessori method of education

See More

Abstract/Notes: The math curriculum of the Montessori system of education for children ages 3–12 is distinctive, incorporating multiple manipulatives and educational practices which have theoretical and empirical support in research. However, studies investigating the math achievement and learning of Montessori students and alumni have not consistently found Montessori programmes to be more effective than conventional or other programmes. Through a detailed review of such studies, we find that a Montessori advantage in math is more likely when programmes adhere to important principles of Montessori education, when students have had longer immersion in Montessori programmes, and when assessments are more conceptual in nature. We suggest that future research should take into account programme fidelity and enrolment duration, and outline other directions for future research. Part of a special issue titled: Early Childhood Theorists and Pioneers

Language: English

DOI: 10.1080/03004430.2020.1860955

ISSN: 0300-4430, 1476-8275

Report

An Evaluation of the Relationship between Academic Performance and Physical Fitness Measures in City Montessori Schools

Available from: Social Science Research Network

See More

Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between academic achievement and physical fitness in City Montessori Schools. Data from the academic year 2004-2005 Fitnessgram were compared to reading, mathematics and science scores on the Health Standards Test (CST) of 253 elementary schools in the Orange County School District. Physical education teachers from the 10 lowest scoring and 10 highest scoring schools were interviewed regarding content of the physical education classes in their school. Simple correlation coefficients revealed a positive linear relationship between academic scores and physical fitness scores. The interview with the teachers revealed that most of the 10 lowest scoring schools did not have a designated physical education teacher. All of the 10 highest scoring schools had designated physical education teachers and followed the physical education guidelines recommended by the Lucknow Education Board.

Language: English

Published: Rochester, NY, Mar 27, 2013

Advanced Search