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451 results

Article

O Ensino de Matemática no Pensamento de Comênius, Pestalozzi e Montessori [The Teaching of Mathematics in the Thinking of Comênius, Pestalozzi and Montessori]

Available from: SciELO

Publication: Educar em Revista, vol. 36

Pages: e64213

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Abstract/Notes: Neste artigo, discutimos os fundamentos para o ensino da Matemática na Pedagogia Tradicional e na Pedagogia Nova, marcadamente, a partir das teorias de fronteira de Comenius, Pestalozzi e Montessori. Esta pesquisa é de cunho documental e bibliográfico. Ao final da análise, concluímos que: há uma circulação de ideias entre o pensamento educacional de Comenius, Pestalozzi e Maria Montessori no que diz respeito ao uso de materiais didáticos e que nos métodos por estes pensadores a Matemática está associada às atividades práticas e gradativas. [In this article, we discuss the fundamentals for the teaching of Mathematics in Traditional Pedagogy and New Pedagogy, markedly, based on theories of Comenius, Pestalozzi and Montessori. This research is documental and bibliographic. At the end of the analysis, we conclude that: there is a circulation of ideas between the educational thoughts of Comenius, Pestalozzi and Maria Montessori regarding the use of didactic materials and that in the methods proposed by these thinkers Mathematics is associated with practical and gradual activities.]

Language: Portuguese, English

DOI: 10.1590/0104-4060.64213

ISSN: 0104-4060, 1984-0411

Article

Four Seventh Grade Students Who Qualify for Academic Intervention Services in Mathematics Learning Multi-Digit Multiplication with the Montessori Checkerboard

Available from: ERIC

Publication: Teaching Exceptional Children Plus (TECPlus), vol. 4, no. 3

Pages: Article 2

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Abstract/Notes: This article describes the positive impact of Montessori manipulative materials on four seventh grade students who qualified for academic intervention services because of previous low state test scores in mathematics. This mathematics technique for teaching multi-digit multiplication uses a placemat-sized quilt with different color-coded squares for place value, color-coded bead bars for representing digits, and small numeral tiles in a procedure related to lattice multiplication. The article presents a brief introduction to the Montessori approach to learning, an overview of Montessori mathematics, and an explanation of the Checkerboard for Multiplication with related multiplication manipulatives. Pretest/posttest results of the four students indicated that all increased their understandings of multiplication. The results of an attitude survey showed students improved in enjoyment, perceived knowledge, and confidence in solving multiplication problems. (Contains 19 figures and 5 tables.)

Language: English

ISSN: 1553-9318

Article

Mathematics in a multi-age setting

Available from: Research Gate

Publication: Australian Primary Mathematics Classroom (APMC), vol. 27, no. 1

Pages: 34-40

Mathematics education, Nongraded schools, ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: How can we engage all primary school students in rich mathematical learning, support them to make connections, and develop their mathematical language and reasoning? In this article, we draw on one school’s experience in considering an approach to mathematics instruction that could support teachers in addressing this question, specifically pursuing structured inquiry in a multi-age setting

Language: English

ISSN: 1326-0286, 1839-4833

Doctoral Dissertation

The Impact of Multi-Age Instruction on Academic Performance in Mathematics and Reading

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

Academic achievement, Americas, Elementary education, Mathematics education, Nongraded schools, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Teachers and administrators are faced with a basic question when planning for a school year: how should the students be grouped when coming to school? Should students of similar age be together or should students be assigned to multi-age classrooms at the elementary school level? If the multi-age method is chosen, how will academic progress be affected by this instructional strategy? And, in the end, will the students in a multi-age setting perform similar to students who are in traditional group setting on standardized tests? The question of multi-age grouping and academic performance was the focus of this study. The purpose of this study was to compare the academic performance in reading and mathematics of third- and fifth-grade students who have completed three years of multi-age instruction with the academic performance of students in third and fifth grade who have been instructed in the similar-aged traditional classroom. The study compared test scores of students in third and fifth grades using the Minnesota Comprehensive Assessment exams. This study determined that there was no significant difference in the scholastic performance between the groups of students who were instructed in the multi-age instructional settings compared to the traditional same age setting. The multi-age setting does allow for positive social settings particularly the opportunity for students to take leadership roles with fellow classmates.

Language: English

Published: Vermillion, South Dakota, 2010

Report

Effectiveness of Direct Verbal Instruction on IQ Performance and Achievement in Reading and Arithmetic [Academic Preschool, Champaign, Illinois]

Available from: ERIC

Academic achievement, Americas, Arithmetic, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Literacy, Mathematics education, North America, Reading, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: This experiment was based on the assumption that the academic failure of the disadvantaged or middle class child is due to a failure of instruction and that if above-normal learning schedules were maintained, the second year of an enrichment program would not show the customary drop in gains from the first year. The subjects of this study were 43 disadvantaged Negro and white 4-year-olds of high, middle, and low intelligence. Fifteen of the children were placed in an experimental group (I) and 28 in a control group (II). A 2-year program involving a group (III) of middle class 4-year-olds was also conducted, with a control group (IV) consisting of middle class 4-year-olds in a Montessori preschool. Groups I and III received a 2-year experimental program in which rapid attainment of basic academic concepts was emphasized. Group II received a 2-year traditional preschool education. Group I achieved significantly greater Stanford-Binet IQ gains than Group II and maintained them over the 2-year program. Group III children also benefited measureably from the program and demonstrated greater achievement in many areas than Group IV.

Language: English

Published: Washington, D.C., 1966

Master's Thesis

A Study Comparing the Effect of Multiage Education Practices versus Traditional Education Practices on Academic Achievement

Available from: ERIC

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Abstract/Notes: This study compared the effects of multi-age classroom strategies to those of traditional classroom strategies on the academic achievement of fourth grade students in reading and math. Standardized test scores from 20 fourth-grade students in two multi-age third- and fourth-grade classrooms were compared to the scores of 20 students from 7 traditional fourth-grade classrooms. The Stanford Achievement Test (SAT), ninth edition was used as the test instrument. Scores from the students' third grade test in the 1996-97 school year were compared to their scores from the fourth grade test in reading and math by applying T-tests to the data. Analysis of the data revealed no difference in reading or math achievement between students taught in a multi-age classroom and those from a traditional classroom.

Language: English

Published: Salem, West Virginia, 1998

Article

Report on Academic Achievement in a Private Montessori School

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 20, no. 2

Pages: 145-147

Academic achievement, Americas, Elementary education, Elementary school students, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, North America, Private schools, Standardized tests, Tim Duax - Writings, United States of America, ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: A study at an established private Montessori school in a diverse suburb revealed strong achievement gains by students on the Stanford Achievement Test, which was administered to 36 students every year from second through eighth grade. Concludes that Montessori elementary education can take high achieving students and produce even higher academic results. (MDM)

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

Montessori vs. Traditional Education in the Public Sector: Seeking Appropriate Comparisons of Academic Achievement

Available from: ERIC

Publication: Forum on Public Policy, vol. 2007, no. 2

Pages: 23 p.

Americas, Comparative education, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., North America, Public Montessori, United States of America, ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Recent years have provided an interest on the part of public school systems regarding Montessori as an educational choice, often as a magnet school option. "No Child Left Behind" legislation emphasizes the social and learning needs of individual children as well as a national spirit of accountability for academic achievement, and the public sector is making a comprehensive examination of curriculum delivery systems which can provide benefits for all learners in quantifiable ways, most often in the form of standardized test scores which demonstrate improved student achievement. This study examines the relationship of public Montessori education expressed as Stanford Achievement Test scores in reading and math in comparison with similar scores for students in traditional programs, using a within subjects, matched pairs design of repeated measures over a three year period. Math scores for the groups were not observed to be significantly different, although, following the initial observation, the Montessori group continued to produce increasingly higher mean scores than the traditional students. Marginal significance between the groups suggests that the data analysis should continue to elucidate a possible trend toward significance. Reading scores for the groups demonstrated significant differences, and in the second and third years of the study, Montessori students produced means which consistently outperformed the traditional group.

Language: English

ISSN: 1556-763X, 1938-9809

Article

Do Children in Montessori Schools Perform Better in the Achievement Test? A Taiwanese Perspective

Available from: Springer Link

Publication: International Journal of Early Childhood, vol. 46, no. 2

Pages: 299-311

Asia, Comparative education, East Asia, Montessori method of education - Evaluation, Taiwan

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Abstract/Notes: The study examines whether elementary school students in Taiwan who had received Montessori education achieved significantly higher scores on tests of language arts, math, and social studies than students who attended non-Montessori elementary programs. One hundred ninety six children in first, second, and third grade participated in the study. Children’s scores were measured by Elementary School Language Ability Achievement Test (ESLAAT), Elementary School Math Ability Achievement Test (ESMAAT), and Social Studies Ability Achievement Test (SSAAT). One-way multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) showed that students who had Montessori experience had a significantly higher score in language arts in all three grade levels. In math, first grade students scored higher but not second and third grade students. However, in social studies, students who had received Montessori education did not score significantly higher than the non-Montessori students. There was also no significant difference between the number of years spent in Montessori programs and students’ language arts, math, and social studies test scores in first, second, and third grade.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1007/s13158-014-0108-7

ISSN: 0020-7187, 1878-4658

Article

Comprehensive School Reform and Achievement: A Meta-Analysis

Available from: SAGE Journals

Publication: Review of Educational Research, vol. 73, no. 2

Pages: 125-230

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Abstract/Notes: Using 232 studies, this meta analysis reviewed the research on the achievement effects of the nationally disseminated and externally developed school improvement programs known as "whole-school" or "comprehensive" reforms. In addition to reviewing the overall achievement effects of comprehensive school reform (CSR), the meta analysis considered the specific effects of 29 of the most widely implemented models. It also assessed how various CSR components, contextual factors, and methodological factors associated with the studies mediate the effects of CSR. The analysis concludes that CSR is still an evolving field and that there are limitations on the overall quantity and quality of the research base. The overall effects of CSR, though, appear promising and the combined quantity, quality, and statistical significance of evidence from three of the models in particular set them apart from the rest. Whether evaluations are carried out by the developer or by third-party evaluators and whether these evaluators use one-group pre-post designs or control groups are especially important factors for understanding differences in CSR effects. Schools implementing CSR models for five years or more showed particularly strong effects, but the models benefited equally schools of higher and lower poverty levels. A long-term commitment to research-proven educational reform is needed to establish a strong marketplace of scientifically based models capable of bringing comprehensive reform to the nations schools. One appendix lists studies included in the meta analysis, and the other discusses CSR design characteristics. (Contains 1 figure, 5 tables, and 74 references.) (SLD) Also included in JSTOR: https://www.jstor.org/stable/3516091

Language: English

DOI: 10.3102/00346543073002125

ISSN: 0034-6543, 1935-1046

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