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Article

IMS Montessori Schools [Profiles of 4 Schools]

Publication: Montessori Observer, vol. 3, no. 4

Pages: 1, 3

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Language: English

Blog Post

Are Montessori Schools Better Than Public Schools?

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Abstract/Notes: Dr. Angeline Lillard discusses her new research on the benefits of a Montessori education.

Language: English

Published: Dec 16, 2021

Report

An Evaluation of the Relationship between Academic Performance and Physical Fitness Measures in City Montessori Schools

Available from: Social Science Research Network

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Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between academic achievement and physical fitness in City Montessori Schools. Data from the academic year 2004-2005 Fitnessgram were compared to reading, mathematics and science scores on the Health Standards Test (CST) of 253 elementary schools in the Orange County School District. Physical education teachers from the 10 lowest scoring and 10 highest scoring schools were interviewed regarding content of the physical education classes in their school. Simple correlation coefficients revealed a positive linear relationship between academic scores and physical fitness scores. The interview with the teachers revealed that most of the 10 lowest scoring schools did not have a designated physical education teacher. All of the 10 highest scoring schools had designated physical education teachers and followed the physical education guidelines recommended by the Lucknow Education Board.

Language: English

Published: Rochester, NY, Mar 27, 2013

Article

Views on Montessori approach by teachers serving at schools applying the Montessori approach [Montessori yaklaşımını uygulayan okullarda çalışan öğretmenlerin Montessori yaklaşımına ilişkin görüşleri]

Available from: Eurasian Journal of Educational Research

Publication: Eurasian Journal of Educational Research [Egitim Arastirmalari], no. 66

Pages: 123-138

Asia, Middle East, Turkey, Western Asia

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Abstract/Notes: Problem Statement: Further studies on Montessori teachers are required on the grounds that the Montessori approach, which, having been applied throughout the world, holds an important place in the alternative education field. Yet it is novel for Turkey, and there are only a limited number of studies on Montessori teachers in Turkey. Purpose of Study: The aim was to investigate views on the Montessori approach by the teachers who serve at the schools applying the Montessori approach. Methods: Research data was collected by the basic qualitative research, one of the qualitative research methods. Descriptive analysis method was used in analysis of the qualitative data. Nine teachers serving at three different schools in Ankara province applying Montessori approach were interviewed. Findings and Results: Eight main themes were determined upon data analysis; namely, education on Montessori approach, basic qualities required for teachers applying Montessori approach, adequacy of education on Montessori approach, in-service training on the challenges experienced by Montessori teachers, plans of teachers for self-development, following existing studies in Turkey on Montessori approach, views on studies on Montessori approach, and views on the criticisms towards Montessori approach. Conclusions and Recommendations: All teachers confirmed that they internalized the approach upon training in line with Montessori philosophy. They emphasized that they received training covering all the educational fields, yet the implementation dimension was inadequate due to training without the involvement of children. Furthermore, they suggested that all the schools in Turkey were opened by commercial motives, and as such these schools failed to comply with the standards of the institutions providing education on the basis of Montessori approach. They asserted that all criticisms towards Montessori approach would be proved to be groundless upon implementation of the approach. It was seen that experienced supervisors, in-service training, and scientific studies on Montessori approach were required.

Language: English, Turkish

ISSN: 1302-597X, 2528-8911

Conference Paper

Use of Checklists for CCE in Montessori Schools

National Conference on Assessment Practices in Schools

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Abstract/Notes: Among the various forms of assessment that Montessori teachers use in the schools at the pre-primary levels, checklists are very common. Yet it has been found that most teachers use these to write reports rather than to modify classroom practices or their perceptions. My study shows that they form an ideal tool for Continuous Comprehensive Evaluation, particularly in the lower grades, where children are not yet ready for tests and exams. It also tracks their impact on teacher learning and change in four schools in Karnataka. Questions for the study are How is a common checklist used for Continuous Comprehensive Evaluation in Montessori schools? What change does it bring about in classroom practices in the process of its implementation? The checklists in this study were developed in the process of teacher training in an NGO program and refined later in discussions and from teacher feedbacks. They were used in the present investigation and the impact studied over a period of 1 ½ to 2 ½ years. At the beginning of the program, teachers were trained in utilizing it to list the lessons given by them to the pupils. Over the years, they were helped to use the list to track learning outcomes. They were also shown how to use them to adapt their work to suit the needs of their pupils. Data for this study was collected as field notes, check lists filled by teachers, interviews with facilitators who acted as mentors as well as teachers, and reports and analysed inductively. The results show that checklists in a Montessori classroom supported by mentoring can be an effective way of continuously evaluating and improving the learning in students.

Language: English

Master's Thesis

Children's Well-Being in Traditional Vs. Montessori Schools: A test of Self-Determination Theory

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Abstract/Notes: The present study is a test of Self -Determination theory, which is well established in the field of education with a huge body of empirical evidence to support its assumptions that when the three universal psychological needs (Autonomy, Competence & Relatedness) of a child are met they will grow and function optimally leading to enhanced well-being. It is evident that Montessori philosophy is overlapping with the components of SDT. This study was conducted to examine the extent to which the three psychological needs are satisfied in Montessori schools in comparison to the Traditional schools. A purposive sample size of 80 children in elementary grades was selected from both Montessori and Traditional schools. Perceived support experienced by the children and their Well-Being was determined to establish the assumption of the SDT. The results showed that children in Montessori schools experienced greater satisfaction of needs when compared to traditional school children. However, the well-being of children from both school types didn’t vary much and the causes can be attributed to factors outside classroom. These findings have some strong implications for policy makers, educators and parents.

Language: English

Published: Bangalore, India, 2018

Article

The Development of Montessori Schools: A Comparative Analysis

Publication: Montessori Research Europe (MoRE) Newsletter

Pages: 7

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Abstract/Notes: MORE Abstracts 2003 Reconstructing and accounting for the Montessori movement in the world and of the spread of the Montessori method in school systems of various countries is a difficult task and is practically impossible here. However, we cannot ignore the very widespread dissemination that this educational model has had, and continues to have, in virtually all five continents: Europe, America (North, Central and South), Asia, Africa and Oceania. The aim of this contribution is to present, through a quantitative kind of analysis, an initial up-todate picture of the current state of things in some European countries in order to obtain, in particular, useful statistical data for a comparison with today’s state of development of Montessori schools in Italy. Starting from an overall glance of Europe, it was decided to select those European countries which, from an initial examination, had already provided for a systemisation of certain data on Montessori schools and the public availability of the data. For each country, a brief history of the Montessori movement will be given at the start. As regards the Italian situation, instead, contacts have been made with the Ministry of Education and with regional education offices responsible for collecting as analytical and up-to-date data as possible on the state of the art in each region. This contribution does not intend to solicit an evaluation that merely takes into account the number of Montessori schools, since Montessori’s influence could appear still limited today if we only consider this aspect. Other references, of a more specifically qualitative kind, could be considered later on by taking into account statistical data and those indicators of criteria for a qualitative selection of schools.

Language: English

Doctoral Dissertation

An Exploration of the Experience of Teachers in Facilitating Meta-Learning Among Students in Christian Montessori Schools

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

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Abstract/Notes: This basic qualitative research records the author’s findings from the one-on-one in-depth personal interviews with twenty-three teachers, trainers, and administrators working for the Christian Montessori schools. The purpose of the study was to explore the experiences of the teachers in facilitating meta-learning, the how-to-learn and the why-to-learn, among students in the Christian Montessori schools. The findings are as follows: First, both the Montessorian training and the Christian spiritual preparation of the teachers in the Christian Montessori schools enables them to effectively facilitate both the how-to-learn and the why-to-learn meta-learning, which endorses their claim that they are the true heir of the original Montessori method; second, the teachers’ most meaningful way of facilitating meta-learning is students’ receiving spontaneous training through the teachers’ respectful scaffolding; third, the Christian Montessori school model is an integrated and viable system for educational reform pursuing both the how-to-learn and the why-to-learn at the same time.

Language: English

Published: Deerfield, Illinois, 2020

Article

Pedagogical Knowledge for Teaching Mathematics in Montessori Schools

Available from: International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education

Publication: International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education, vol. 16, no. 3

Pages: Article em0646

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Abstract/Notes: Teacher knowledge needed for teaching is widely studied to characterize its key categories. We report findings from a study on teachers’ knowledge for mathematics in the Montessori schools. In Montessori accredited schools, teachers learn to teach mathematics in ways different from the teachers themselves experienced in non-Montessori schools. We ask: What knowledge do teachers learn? and how do they continue to refine this knowledge in teaching in classrooms? We draw from a teacher knowledge framework based on cross-national studies to interpret mixed data from a case study. We aim to inform research on teacher characteristics needed for consistent implementation of instructional reform. Major findings from this study are that for K-6 Montessori teachers to thrive in teaching mathematics in Montessori classrooms, they need teacher knowledge on Montessori materials, on lesson and the presentation of content according to Montessori’s philosophy and pedagogy; as well as on the process of independently understanding concepts to be presented. The findings contribute to further theorizing on teacher knowledge which has implications is designed to teacher training opportunities in three subcategories; namely teaching, learning, and professional competence knowledge.

Language: English

DOI: 10.29333/iejme/11005

ISSN: 1306-3030

Master's Thesis

Montessori and Religious Education in Western Cape Preschools

Available from: University of Cape Town

Africa, Catholic schools, Comparative education, Jewish religious schools, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, Religious education, South Africa, Southern Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa

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Abstract/Notes: The debate about whether or not religious education should be included in early childhood education is a longstanding one. Even those who believe that Religious education should be included in early childhood programs cannot agree about the content or method for including it. The phenomenon of religious education in Montessori pre-primary schools in the Western Cape Province of South Africa is explored in this study, using a qualitative research approach. More specifically, the study explored the goals of their religious education; the level of awareness of Montessori's approach to religious education and finally looked at how they were implementing religion in their schools. A sample of 4 pre-schools were selected from the 90 Montessori pre-schools in the Western Cape. These included a Non-Denominational, Muslim, Christian and a Jewish School. The Muslim and Non-Denominational schools are full Montessori schools, while the Christian and Jewish schools have incorporated Montessori alongside other curriculums, namely the Jubilee Excellence School Curriculum and Reggio-Emilia approach, respectively. A collective case study approach was adopted and data was collected through observations and interviews. While the findings cannot easily be generalized, it is significant in providing a starting point to understanding the phenomenon of religious education in Montessori pre-schools in the Western Cape. The study highlighted Dr Montessori's personal and professional struggle with religion and found that the struggles Dr Montessori faced in terms of Religion have still not been resolved today. The schools in the Western Cape still grappled with the essence of Montessori's struggle, i.e. where to place religion and how to integrate it in the Montessori method and philosophy. Dr Montessori's beliefs about the importance of spirituality in the early years were found to be consistent with the contemporary views of scholars around the world. The religious schools followed guidelines of their own religions when deciding on which values to focus on. At the Jewish school, the focus was on the community, while at the Muslim school the focus was on the individual and selfetiquette. The focus of the Christian school was on discipline and obedience. The schools had various commitments to spiritual and ethical development of the children. Finally, the study found that the Montessori method was ideal for teaching the practices of religion, but when schools delved into issues of faith or love of God, they switched to other modes of teaching (e.g. preaching). This disjuncture between teaching faith and practices was ultimately Dr Montessori's reason for abolishing religious education from her method.

Language: English

Published: Cape Town, South Africa, 2017

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