Quick Search
For faster results please use our Quick Search engine.

Advanced Search

Search across titles, abstracts, authors, and keywords.
Advanced Search Guide.

1107 results

Article

Blending Differing Perspectives of Parents and Guides: Meeting Parents Where They Are and Bringing Them along on the Journey

Available from: ERIC

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 39, no. 1

Pages: 91-97

See More

Abstract/Notes: Maura Joyce's clear approach to initiating parent education is to recognize where the parents are on their own journey as parents. By listening to the parents' hopes, fears, and desired outcomes for their children acknowledges the family's perspective and brings mutuality into a shared community. Maura Joyce encourages the use of questionnaires and feedback and gives specific exercises to implement parent education, open communication, and ease parents' anxieties. [This talk was presented at the NAMTA conference titled "The Montessori Oasis: Prepared Pathways for a Sustainable School Community," Columbia, MD, October 3-6, 2013.]

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

The Effect of Seesaw Technology on Parent Engagement at Private Montessori Schools

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

See More

Abstract/Notes: The researchers looked at how using Seesaw technology, in a six-week parent education intervention, would affect parent engagement with their children in learning at home as well as parent understanding of Montessori principles. The research participants were 31 parents and 2 teachers at two private, urban Montessori schools. Data was collected through pre and postintervention questionnaires, teacher logs of parent questions, and Seesaw usage data. Through the intervention, we saw parent knowledge of Montessori principles, parent engagement, parent efficacy, and parent confidence in Montessori education beyond preschool increase. Parents also enjoyed interacting with each other as a community of parents, building a school community. The research supports Seesaw as an effective tool for parent education in today’s digital world. Technology is something that is familiar to today’s parent and can be utilized more specifically and intentionally by schools to connect parents to student learning activities, to their community, and to encourage their own growth as parents. This growth was demonstrated by a shift in parents’ focus from the external (child’s behavior) to the internal (adult’s role in preparing the environment) consistent with Montessori’s prepared adult

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2018

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

Effective and Efficient Parent-Teacher Communication

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

See More

Abstract/Notes: This action research study examines parent-teacher communication using a combination of an online email program called MailChimp, a text app called Remind, and a class web page. A group of 17 parents from a private elementary classroom in a Montessori school agreed to participate in this study. Time sheets, check-off lists, feedback from parents, and statistics from MailChimp were used to collect data. The majority of the parents were pleased with the school-to-home communication during this period. The email and text message programs were the most efficient communication methods. Updating the class web page proved to be the most time-consuming communication process. This study showed why teachers should use a variety of correspondence methods in order to be effective communicators. While I will continue to use MailChimp, Remind, and my web page for parent-teacher communication, I also discovered there is room for improvement in my communication methods.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2015

Doctoral Dissertation

An Examination of Culturally Relevant Pedagogy and Antibias-Antiracist Curriculm in a Montessori Setting

Available from: Lynn University - Electronic Theses and Dissertations

See More

Abstract/Notes: The research consisted of a qualitative case study of three urban public Montessori schools with a population of 51% or more of students of color and a commitment of 2 years or more of CRP-ABAR within a Montessori setting. The theoretical framework used for the study was the critical race theory, which is the conceptual foundation for examining inequities in public education. This research dissertation had a focus on gaining an insight into the perceptions of administrators, teachers, and parents toward CRP-ABAR in Montessori schools by examining the practices in three public Montessori schools. The possible connections to student outcomes, such as behavioral referrals, suspension rates, and academic achievement for students of color were explored to determine if any connections exist between CRP-ABAR and outcomes for students of color within a public Montessori setting. Three major themes emerged of the perceptions of administrators, teachers, and parents about the impact of the CRP-ABAR in a Montessori setting. The CRP-ABAR could be delivered through a curriculum-oriented approach or a systemic-oriented approach and the CRP-ABAR connects to Montessori through peace-global education and the prepared teacher-environment. The CRP-ABAR practices impact students of color primarily through social emotional growth with limited academic outcomes. Even with an intentional focus and diversity training, many non-Black teachers’ perceptions of students of color included deficit theory thinking. Some parents believed racism is being dismantled through the curriculum and celebrations of diversity. Other parents identified some teachers-staff with underpinning instances of biases and insensitivity.

Language: English

Published: Boca Raton, Florida, 2020

Conference Paper

Teachers' lives and work in a cultural and historical context. Reflections based on the professional life histories of eight Montessori teachers in Sweden

Available from: DiVA Portal

World Education Fellowship (41st, Sun City, South Africa, 22-27 April 2001)

See More

Abstract/Notes: This paper discusses the implications of using life history methodology in teacher research. By examining teachers’ life stories within a cultural and historical context the researcher and teacher, in collaboration, construct a life history. Biographical material based on the personal and professional aspects of being a teacher were collected from eight Montessori teachers in Sweden. Empirical data included interviews, diaries, written narratives and discussions. Theoretical and philosophical issues raised in conjunction with the biographies included counterconcepts such as traditional educational theory/critical reflection and continuity/change within the profession. Specific issues were raised in regard to students, parents, the work situation, etc. Valuable insights were gained concerning the changing roles of teachers in contemporary educational contexts. The voices and visions of teachers should thus be able to contribute to a deeper understanding of the role of the teacher and by so doing lead to improvements within the profession as a whole.

Language: English

Article

Montessori Early Childhood Teacher Perceptions of Family Priorities and Stressors

Available from: University of Kansas Libraries

Publication: Journal of Montessori Research, vol. 1, no. 1

Pages: 1-13

Perceptions

See More

Abstract/Notes: Teachers of young children work closely with families. One component of teacher-family partnerships is teachers’ understanding of family priorities and stressors. This study examines Montessori early childhood (ages three through six) teacher perceptions of family priorities and stressors through an analysis of responses to two parallel surveys. Eighty teachers (37% of those who received the survey) and forty-nine family members (representing a 55% response rate) completed the survey. Significant differences were found between teachers’ perceptions of four (of seven) family priorities and families’ actual responses. Teachers ranked “making academic progress” as the most important of seven possible family priorities. However, families stated that “developing kindness” is the most important priority for their young children. No significant differences were found when comparing teacher rankings of family stressors with actual family responses. Montessori early childhood teachers ranked “not having enough time” as the most stressful of six possible stressors. Families confirmed that time pressures cause them the most stress. Maria Montessori’s recommendations for teachers and families are summarized. Recommendations for building stronger family partnerships in the context of Montessori’s philosophy, for example on-going self-reflection, are provided.

Language: English

DOI: 10.17161/jomr.v1i1.4939

ISSN: 2378-3923

Doctoral Dissertation

Teacher Beliefs, Attitudes, and Expectations Towards Students with Attention Disorders in Three Schools in the United Kingdom's Independent School System

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, Attention-deficit-disordered children, Children with disabilities, England, Europe, Inclusive education, Northern Europe, Northern Ireland, Perceptions, Scotland, Teachers - Attitudes, United Kingdom

See More

Abstract/Notes: Scope and method of study. The purpose of this qualitative study was to investigate the connection between the beliefs, attitudes, and expectations teachers exhibit towards students who have attention challenges in three independent schools in England and the pathognomonic-interventionist continuum as identified by Jordan-Wilson and Silverman (1991), which identifies, along a scale, where teachers' beliefs lie. Teachers' sense of efficacy as they meet individual student needs was also explored as was what educators in these schools, who have limited, if any, recourse to special education assistance, do to support students who display the characteristics of attention deficit. The pathognomonic-interventionist continuum and Bandura's (1977) construct of self-efficacy were the lenses used to focus the research. The study records participants' responses and reflections about the phenomenon under study, describing what it is they do, how they perceive their responsibility towards their students, and how they support each other. Findings and conclusions. Data compiled from a sample of 10 teachers and 3 head-teachers, were disaggregated to provide a picture of how participant teachers work with attentionally challenged children in selected English independent schools. The results provide evidence that teachers whose profile identifies them with the interventionist perspective present stronger senses of self-efficacy. They are prepared to undertake prereferral-type activities to determine where the student is experiencing difficulty and are then willing to manipulate the learning environment to meet individual student needs. Teachers in these schools perceive it as their professional obligation to design teaching scenarios to benefit all students. Teacher efficacy, their sense of their ability to positively influence their students' educational performance and achievement, is unrelated to years of experience or educational background, but is related to the beliefs which they hold.

Language: English

Published: Stillwater, Oklahoma, 2006

Doctoral Dissertation

Montessori as Metonymy: How Montessori Early Childhood Teachers Approach Race in the Classroom

Available from: Bethel University - Institutional Repository

See More

Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine how Montessori early childhood teachers approach teaching about race and racial bias in their classrooms. Twenty-four Montessori early childhood teachers participated in an open-ended survey, and five teachers of those 24 participated in a data-informed online semi-structured interview. The interviewees received an infographic with narrative and graphics in which themes of the survey were detailed, a form of graphic elicitation. Surveys and interviews were coded and analyzed for themes. Themes were verified through independent coding by an independent analyst. Several themes that emerged from the surveys and interviews indicated that 1) Montessori early childhood teachers generally hold a race neutral view of early childhood, 2) Most Montessori early childhood teachers believe that young children do not have bias, 3) Most Montessori early childhood teachers believe that teaching about race and racial bias is implicit in their Montessori training on culture, peace, and respect, 4) Montessori early childhood teachers did not receive explicit instruction from their Montessori training or education programs regarding teaching about race and racial bias, and 5) Most Montessori early childhood teachers supplemented their training with books or developed lessons outside of those obtained in training to teach about race. Reasons for participants' beliefs around race, racial bias, prejudice, young children, and teaching are discussed, as well as the implications of these outcomes. The results of this study were used to develop recommendations for Montessori teachers, Montessori teacher education programs, and national Montessori organizations. Recommendations for further research suggest that a broad examination of demographics along with data on how Montessori teachers are teaching about race and racial bias may yield pertinent information that could further guide educators and trainers.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2018

Article

Parent/Teacher Issues

Publication: The Alcove: Newsletter of the Australian AMI Alumni Association, no. 10

Pages: 2–4

Parent-teacher relationships

See More

Language: English

Article

Something for Everyone: Benefits of Mixed-Age Grouping for Children, Parents, and Teachers.

Available from: JSTOR

Publication: Young Children, vol. 48, no. 5

Pages: 82-87

Child development, Classroom environment, Early childhood education, Nongraded schools, Parent-teacher relationships

See More

Abstract/Notes: Discusses the benefits of mixed-age grouping for children's social and cognitive development and reservations parents sometimes have about mixed-age groupings. Also discusses issues that teachers need to consider when implementing mixed-age groups: children's personal care routines; furnishings; children's language, motor, creative, and social development; and the needs of adults. (BB)

Language: English

ISSN: 0044-0728

Advanced Search