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Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Possible Connections Between the Montessori Method and Philosophy for Children

Available from: Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro

Publication: Childhood and Philosophy, vol. 16, no. 36

Pages: 01-22

Comparative education, Montessori method of education, Philosophy for Children, derecho a pensar

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Abstract/Notes: This paper aims to focus on certain aspects of two education methods: one initiated in the first half of the twentieth century by Maria Montessori, and the other in the second half of that century by Matthew Lipman. The aim – neither comparative nor analytical – is to shed light on the connections and, more specifically, the elements of the Montessori Method that reflect on Lipman’s proposal. The question this paper aims to answer is: can P4C find fertile ground in schools applying the Montessori Method? The paper will focus, among other elements: on the importance to give space to thinking experience from childhood and on the recognition of the value of childhood. Both Lipman and Montessori have systematically observed children of different ages – the former in the first half, the latter in the second half of the twentieth century. Both characterized, gave value, and focused their scientific contributions on children’s ability to think and express their thoughts through languages (purposely in the plural form). As educational researchers and professionals know, children have the ability to think, but such ability has not always been (still isn’t) considered to exist. Even when it is evoked in words, educational choices and proposals seem – still today – to express mistrust towards children’s thought. The two mentioned authors have repeatedly highlighted the importance of an essential right: the right to think and to be given a space – even as children – to exercise thinking with others. In particular, both authors – though envisaging different educational paths – identified the same categories functional to exercising thinking. Their interconnection may guide the actions of teachers, educators, and learning process experts. In fact, P4C might play a role in educational contexts in which the class is already considered a community of inquiry, in which the teacher is assigned the same role as a facilitator

Language: English

DOI: 10.12957/childphilo.2020.46784

ISSN: 1984-5987

Article

A Tiny Town Teaches Big Concepts [Model city at Lavonna Peterson Early Childhood School, Kansas City, MO]

Publication: The National Montessori Reporter, vol. 20, no. 4

Pages: 20

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Language: English

Article

Rebuilding and Extending Montessori in Haiti: Update on the Peter Hesse Foundation Partnerships

Available from: University of Connecticut Libraries - American Montessori Society Records

Publication: Public School Montessorian, vol. 23, no. 1

Pages: 12

Americas, Caribbean, Haiti, Latin America and the Caribbean, Peter Hesse Foundation - History, Public Montessori

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Abstract/Notes: El Boletin, Fall 2010

Language: English

ISSN: 1071-6246

Article

Let Peter Rabbit Play in the Garden: Using Beatrix Potter's Work to Integrate Ecological Literacy into Montessori Classrooms

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 26, no. 4

Pages: 38-43

Lower elementary, ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Kelly Johnson introduces a series of lessons that incorporate literacy, observation, botany, history, place studies, writing, and art, with a long-term eco-literacy goal of connectedness and a conservation ethic. Johnson's initial idea to use Beatrix Potter as a model in the Lower Elementary classroom came after extensively researching Potter's life as part of her graduate studies. Johnson begins the series of lessons by presenting "The Tale of Peter Rabbit," asking the students if they remember the story. The stories are amazingly versatile, and, by analyzing the writing, the students begin to see the tales as far more than nursery stories--they are animal character glimpses, human nature vignettes, pieces of visual art, and works of literary art. Johnson concludes that when children are allowed free time in nature, as Beatrix Potter was during her childhood summers, they build unbreakable bonds that influence their adult lifestyle choices.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Book

The Philosophy of Maria Montessori: What it Means to be Human

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Language: English

Published: [S.I.]: Xlibris, 2009

Article

Suzuki Philosophy and the Development of the Child

Publication: The Alcove: Newsletter of the Australian AMI Alumni Association, no. 2

Pages: 2

Child development, Shinichi Suzuki - Philosophy, Suzuki Method

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Language: English

Master's Thesis

A Comparison of the Philosophy of Maria Montessori to Current Research on the Educational Practices of Developmentally Delayed and At Risk Students

Available from: Lynn University - Electronic Theses and Dissertations

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Language: English

Published: Boca Raton, Florida, 2002

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

The Moral Philosophy of Maria Montessori

Available from: Cambridge University Press

Publication: Journal of the American Philosophical Association, vol. 7, no. 2

Pages: 133-154

Maria Montessori - Philosophy, Moral education

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Abstract/Notes: This paper lays out the moral theory of philosopher and educator Maria Montessori (1870–1952). Based on a moral epistemology wherein moral concepts are grounded in a well-cultivated moral sense, Montessori develops a threefold account of moral life. She starts with an account of character as an ideal of individual self-perfection through concentrated attention on effortful work. She shows how respect for others grows from and supplements individual character, and she further develops a notion of social solidarity that goes beyond cooperation toward shared agency. Partly because she attends to children's ethical lives, Montessori highlights how character, respect, and solidarity all appear first as prereflective, embodied orientations of agency. Full moral virtue takes up prereflective orientations reflectively and extends them through moral concepts. Overall, Montessori's ethic improves on features similar to some in Nietzschean, Kantian, Hegelian, or Aristotelian ethical theories while situating these within a developmental and perfectionist ethics.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1017/apa.2019.41

ISSN: 2053-4477, 2053-4485

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

The Efficacy of Memory Training Using Montessori Philosophy-based Activities in Mild Dementia Elderly

Available from: Thai Journals Online

Publication: Journal of the Psychiatric Association of Thailand, vol. 54, no. 2

Pages: 197-208

Alzheimer's disease, Asia, Dementia, Gerontology, Maria Montessori - Philosophy, Montessori method of education, Montessori therapy, Montessori-based interventions (MBI), Southeast Asia, Thailand

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Abstract/Notes: AbstractObjective: To compare the memory scores in mild dementia elderly who attended Montessori-based Memory training with the control group who did not.Method: The Solomon four-group design was used to test the memory of the subjects. The subject of the study consisted of 40 elderly at Banbanglamung Social Welfare Development Center for Older Persons. Participants were divided to 2 experimental and 2 control groups by random sampling technique. Mini mental status Exam-Thai 2002 and Thai Geriatric Depression scale were used as a tool in selecting the subject and a tool to differentiate the mild dementia elderly group from the depressed group. The digit span and digit symbol subtests of The Wechsler Intelligence scale were used in memory testing. The data obtained was analyzed by means of descriptive statistics, t-test and one-way ANOVA.Results: The average scores of the digit span and digit symbol of the experimental groups and the controlled groups were significantly different (p<0.05). After 4 weeks of training, the average scores ofthe experimental groups increased more than that of the controlled group. After training, the average scores of memory of the four groups were significantly indifferent (p<0.05). Digit symbol scores of the experimental groups were higher than of the controlled groups by using LSD method.Conclusion: After memory training, the average scores of the digit span and digit symbol of the experimental groups were significantly higher than the controlled group. This differentce still persistedat the 12th week of training. Therefore, this memory training should be used with the elderly to prevent and delay dementia.

Language: Thai

ISSN: 2697-4126

Article

New Developments in Neuroscience Supports [sic.] Montessori Under Three Philosophy

Publication: Montessori NewZ, vol. 20

Pages: 7

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Language: English

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