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1113 results

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Physical Activity in Preschool Children: Comparison Between Montessori and Traditional Preschools

Available from: Wiley Online Library

Publication: Journal of School Health, vol. 84, no. 11

Pages: 716-721

Americas, Comparative education, Montessori method of education - Evaluation, North America, Physical education, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Little is known about the influence of Montessori methods on children's physical activity (PA). This cross-sectional study compared PA of children attending Montessori and traditional preschools. We enrolled 301 children in 9 Montessori and 8 traditional preschools in Columbia, South Carolina. PA was measured by accelerometry on weekdays during preschool (In-School), non-school (Non-School), and all day (All Day). Minutes/hour of light, moderate-to-vigorous (MVPA), and total PA (light + MVPA) were calculated. Children attending Montessori preschools accumulated more In-School light (7.7 vs. 6.5 minute/hour), MVPA (7.7 versus 6.5 minute/hour), and total PA (15.4 versus 13.0 minute/hour) than children attending traditional preschools, after adjusting for sex, race/ethnicity, body mass index, parent education and neighborhood poverty index. For Non-School (8.5 versus 6.2 minute/hour) and All Day (8.5 versus 7.6 minute/hour), children in Montessori preschools accumulated more MVPA than children in traditional preschools. In-School PA was higher for children in private Montessori than public Montessori preschools (8.1 versus 7.0 minute/hour; 8.1 versus 6.7 minute/hour; 16.1 versus 13.6 minute/hour, for light, MVPA, and total PA, respectively). Children attending Montessori preschools were more active than children attending traditional preschools. Adopting the Montessori system may be an important strategy for promoting PA in children.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1111/josh.12207

ISSN: 1746-1561

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Approaches Adopted by Preschools to Foster Literacy Skills Among Preschoolers

Available from: Language in India

Publication: Language in India, vol. 11, no. 10

Pages: 150-170

Asia, India, South Asia

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Abstract/Notes: Pre-school programs give children an edge in a competitive world and education climate. It teaches children the basic skills necessary to be successful in formal schooling. Pre-schools provide children a good foundation for continued learning, communication, higher self-esteem and enjoyment of the learning process. Pre-schools have the important task of giving children numerous and varied opportunities to promote children’s development during the formative years including physical development, social development and literary competence. Literary competences open the door to academic learning and help ensure later success in school. The present study was conducted to elicit information on the approaches adopted by pre-schools to foster literary skills among pre-schoolers in Bangalore city. A representative sample of 30 preschool centres were surveyed - 9 Montessori, 8 kindergarten, 8 play-way and 5 crèches. After an introductory session in the preschool centres, a self-developed questionnaire was distributed to the preschool teachers to elicit information on the approaches adopted by pre-schools to foster literary skills among pre-schoolers. Analysis of data obtained indicated that the preschools surveyed had no adequate approaches to foster literary skills in pre-schoolers. Also the preschools surveyed had no adequate library facilities.

Language: English

ISSN: 1930-2940

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Objectively Measured Sedentary Behavior in Preschool Children: Comparison Between Montessori and Traditional Preschools

Available from: BioMed Central

Publication: The International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, vol. 10, no. 2

Pages: Article 2

Americas, Comparative education, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Montessori method of education - Evaluation, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Background This study aimed to compare the levels of objectively-measured sedentary behavior in children attending Montessori preschools with those attending traditional preschools. Methods The participants in this study were preschool children aged 4 years old who were enrolled in Montessori and traditional preschools. The preschool children wore ActiGraph accelerometers. Accelerometers were initialized using 15-second intervals and sedentary behavior was defined as <200 counts/15-second. The accelerometry data were summarized into the average minutes per hour spent in sedentary behavior during the in-school, the after-school, and the total-day period. Mixed linear regression models were used to determine differences in the average time spent in sedentary behavior between children attending traditional and Montessori preschools, after adjusting for selected potential correlates of preschoolers’ sedentary behavior. Results Children attending Montessori preschools spent less time in sedentary behavior than those attending traditional preschools during the in-school (44.4. min/hr vs. 47.1 min/hr, P = 0.03), after-school (42.8. min/hr vs. 44.7 min/hr, P = 0.04), and total-day (43.7 min/hr vs. 45.5 min/hr, P = 0. 009) periods. School type (Montessori or traditional), preschool setting (private or public), socio-demographic factors (age, gender, and socioeconomic status) were found to be significant predictors of preschoolers’ sedentary behavior. Conclusions Levels of objectively-measured sedentary behavior were significantly lower among children attending Montessori preschools compared to children attending traditional preschools. Future research should examine the specific characteristics of Montessori preschools that predict the lower levels of sedentary behavior among children attending these preschools compared to children attending traditional preschools.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1186/1479-5868-10-2

ISSN: 1479-5868

Book

Preschool Directory: Preschools, Montessori Schools, Park District Programs, Day Care Centers

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Language: English

Published: Arlington Heights, Illinois: American Association of University Women, 1983

Article

Montessori Way of Teaching Preschoolers: The Panacea for Effective Learning and Swift Comprehension of the Subject Matter by Preschoolers in Akwa Ibom and Abia States

Available from: Global Academic Star

Publication: Shared Season Journal of Topical Issues, vol. 9, no. 1

Pages: 49-63

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Abstract/Notes: The study investigated the effectiveness of the Montessori way of teaching preschoolers in Akwa Ibom and Abia states in Nigeria. A correlational survey design was employed, and 200 preschoolers were selected using stratified sampling. A structured questionnaire called the Montessori Way of Teaching Preschoolers and Effective Learning Questionnaire (MTPELQ) was used for data collection. Face and content validation of the instrument was carried out by an expert in test, measurement, and evaluation. The reliability coefficient obtained was 0.83. The researcher subjected the data generated for this study to appropriate statistical techniques such as descriptive statistics and simple regression analysis. The test for significance was done at 0.05 alpha levels. The results showed that the Montessori method, particularly the "Prepared environment," had the highest percentage value among the different teaching approaches. Furthermore, there was a high extent of learning observed as a result of the Montessori way of teaching. The study also revealed a strong to perfect relationship between Montessori teaching and effective learning. The calculated F-value indicated a significant effect of Montessori teaching on learning. The study concluded that the Montessori approach is beneficial for all children, fostering their natural curiosity and respect for knowledge. One of the recommendations was that the integration of Montessori principles and methodologies into the preschool curriculum in Akwa Ibom and Abia states to enhance active engagement and comprehension of subjects.

Language: English

ISSN: 2630–7290

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Multilingualism in a Montessori Preschool: A Study of Language Variability in a Linguistically Diverse Preschool Programme

Available from: IndianJournals

Publication: Journal of Exclusion Studies, vol. 9, no. 2

Pages: 111-131

Asia, Bilingualism, India, Multilingualism, South Asia

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Abstract/Notes: This article is based on a study of an ‘English-medium’ preschool programme for underprivileged children. The diverse linguistic backgrounds of the teachers and students prompted an enquiry into how multiple languages would be negotiated in the setting and how comprehension, learning and communication would occur given that none of the children came from English-speaking homes. The article identifies and interprets key features of verbal language that were observed in the setting and articulates implications for educational practice.

Language: English

DOI: 10.5958/2231-4555.2019.00009.3

ISSN: 2231-4547, 2231-4555

Book

Preschools and Montessori Preschools: A Discussion

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Language: English

Published: Newtown, Australia: Nursery School Teacher's College, 1980

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

The Comparison of the Intuitive Mathematic Skills of Preschool Children Who Take Education According to Ministry of National Education Preschool Education Program and Montessori Approach

Available from: IISTE - International Knowledge Sharing Platform

Publication: International Journal of Scientific and Technological Research, vol. 6, no. 6

Pages: 167

Asia, Comparative education, Mathematics education, Middle East, Montessori method of education, Preschool children, Preschool education, Turkey, Western Asia

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Abstract/Notes: This study analyzed intuitive mathematics abilities of preschool children and to ascertain whether there was a difference between children who were educated according to the Ministry of National Education (MoNE) preschool education program and the Montessori approach. It was also examined whether the intuitive mathematics abilities of the children who were educated according to the MoNE program and Montessori approach showed a significant difference according to variables of gender, duration of pre-school education, and educational levels of parents. The study sample of the study consisted of 121 children (56 girls, 65 boys) aged between 60-72 months. The data was collected via “Personal Information Form” and “Intuitive Mathematics Ability Scale” developed by Güven (2001). Intuitive mathematical abilities of children who were educated according to the Montessori program were more developed compared to those of children educated according to MoNE program. There was no significant difference in intuitive mathematical abilities according to duration of preschool education, education levels of parents. As a result of the study, a significant difference was observed in the intuitive math abilities of the children trained according to the MoNE program in favor of the girls, whereas no significant difference was observed trained according to the Montessori approach. The results are discussed in light of the relevant literature.

Language: Turkish

DOI: 10.7176/JSTR/6-06-12

ISSN: 2422-8702

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Does Preschool Curriculum Make a Difference in Primary School Performance: Insights into the Variety of Preschool Activities and Their Effects on School Achievement and Behaviour in the Caribbean Island of Trinidad; Cross-Sectional and Longitudinal evidence

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: Early Child Development and Care, vol. 103, no. 1

Pages: 27-42

Americas, Caribbean, Latin America and the Caribbean, Trinidad and Tobago

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Abstract/Notes: Preschool education is an important and much studied topic in developed countries, and of growing importance in the third world. Studies exploring preschool experience have noted positive effects when comparing children with access to preschool versus children without access, and effects of particular curriculum approaches over the length of primary schooling. This study adopts a focused sample, cross‐sectional design to explore the types of preschool experience available (denoted by types of preschool activities which equate broadly to curriculum approaches) and whether variation in preschool experience affects core curriculum (English, science, mathematics) performance and classroom behaviours throughout the years of primary schooling in Trinidad and when children complete their primary education in the form of a national ‘common entrance examination’ for entry into a stratified secondary school system. Results show that a large majority of the sampled children attended preschool and that most of the preschool experience was traditional and teacher centred. Neither child centred or teacher centred preschool activities affected academic performance in the core subjects during the primary school years or at the end of their primary school career. Type of preschool activity did affect teacher perception of behaviour in class. Child centred experience facilitated a social/peer orientation in children. High levels of teacher centred experience detracted from later relationships with teacher. Results were confounded by social class, with middle class children having most access to (the limited amount available) child centred preschool experience and performing at the highest academic and behavioural levels in the classroom although in limited numbers. The discussion questions the appropriacy of the various preschool activities for pupils within a cultural orientation of traditional upbringing and primary schooling practices.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1080/0300443941030103

ISSN: 0300-4430, 1476-8275

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Development of Social, Personal and Cognitive Skills of Preschool Children in Montessori and Traditional Preschool Programs

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: Early Child Development and Care, vol. 72, no. 1

Pages: 117-124

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Abstract/Notes: The relationship between time in Montessori and Traditional Preschool programs and the preschool child's develoment of [1] personal skills, [2] relationship with teachers, [3] peer relations, [4] behavioral control, and [5] cognitive skills with age controlled was used to compare the relative effectiveness of the programs. This design was necessary since it is likely that parents who select the Montessori program for their child are different from parents selecting traditional preschool programs for their children. Three Montessori programs [n = 108] and three traditional programs [n = 116] provided the subjects for the study. The Pre Kindergarten Scale [PKS], a multiple choice behavioral rating scale was completed by the programs’ teachers on each child. The results revealed that the only variable significant in predicting time in program for the traditional program, relationship with teacher, was the only variable insignificant in predicting length of time in program for the Montessori program. The strongest relationship was for length of time in the Montessori program and relationship with peers [18 percent of variance] with age controlled.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1080/0300443910720111

ISSN: 0300-4430, 1476-8275

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