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1594 results

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

The Comparison of the Intuitive Mathematic Skills of Preschool Children Who Take Education According to Ministry of National Education Preschool Education Program and Montessori Approach

Available from: IISTE - International Knowledge Sharing Platform

Publication: International Journal of Scientific and Technological Research, vol. 6, no. 6

Pages: 167

Asia, Comparative education, Mathematics education, Middle East, Montessori method of education, Preschool children, Preschool education, Turkey, Western Asia

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Abstract/Notes: This study analyzed intuitive mathematics abilities of preschool children and to ascertain whether there was a difference between children who were educated according to the Ministry of National Education (MoNE) preschool education program and the Montessori approach. It was also examined whether the intuitive mathematics abilities of the children who were educated according to the MoNE program and Montessori approach showed a significant difference according to variables of gender, duration of pre-school education, and educational levels of parents. The study sample of the study consisted of 121 children (56 girls, 65 boys) aged between 60-72 months. The data was collected via “Personal Information Form” and “Intuitive Mathematics Ability Scale” developed by Güven (2001). Intuitive mathematical abilities of children who were educated according to the Montessori program were more developed compared to those of children educated according to MoNE program. There was no significant difference in intuitive mathematical abilities according to duration of preschool education, education levels of parents. As a result of the study, a significant difference was observed in the intuitive math abilities of the children trained according to the MoNE program in favor of the girls, whereas no significant difference was observed trained according to the Montessori approach. The results are discussed in light of the relevant literature.

Language: Turkish

DOI: 10.7176/JSTR/6-06-12

ISSN: 2422-8702

Article

Achieving Inclusive Education in Early Childhood: From the Viewpoint of an Affinity Between Inclusive Education and Montessori Education

Publication: Montessori Kyōiku / モンテッソーリ教育 [Montessori Education], no. 49

Pages: 100-113

Asia, East Asia, Inclusive education, Japan, Montessori method of education

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Abstract/Notes: This is an article from Montessori Education, a Japanese language periodical published by the Japan Association Montessori.

Language: Japanese

ISSN: 0913-4220

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

L'Apprendimento come partecipazione a contesti significativi: l’esperienza del Reggio Emilia Approach alla luce dei contributi di Maria Montessori e John Dewey

Available from: IUL Press

Publication: IUL Research, vol. 2, no. 4

Pages: 81-92

John Dewey - Philosophy, Maria Montessori - Philosophy, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Reggio Emilia approach (Early childhood education) - Criticism, interpretation, etc.

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Abstract/Notes: Ripercorrendo gli spunti educativi offerti da Montessori e Dewey, il presente contributo intende proporre una lettura ragionata del ruolo del contesto come fattore educante nella pedagogia reggiana. Secondo un approccio socio-costruttivista, non solo l’ambiente scolastico, ma ogni tipologia di contesto sociale e culturale può essere importante ai fini educativi, se vi si rintracciano ed evidenziano relazioni significative, in un’ottica generativa di nuovi significati e relazioni.

Language: Italian

DOI: 10.57568/iulres.v2i4.155

ISSN: 2723-9586

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Three Approaches from Europe: Waldorf, Montessori, and Reggio Emilia

Available from: ECRP Website

Publication: Early Childhood Research and Practice, vol. 4, no. 1

Pages: 1-14

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Abstract/Notes: Waldorf, Montessori, and Reggio Emilia are three progressive approaches to early childhood education that appear to be growing in influence in North America and to have many points in common. This article provides a brief comparative introduction and highlights several key areas of similarity and contrast. All three approaches represent an explicit idealism and turn away from war and violence toward peace and reconstruction. They are built on coherent visions of how to improve human society by helping children realize their full potential as intelligent, creative, whole persons. In each approach, children are viewed as active authors of their own development, strongly influenced by natural, dynamic, self-righting forces within themselves, opening the way toward growth and learning. Teachers depend for their work with children on carefully prepared, aesthetically pleasing environments that serve as a pedagogical tool and provide strong messages about the curriculum and about respect for children. Partnering with parents is highly valued in all three approaches, and children are evaluated by means other than traditional tests and grades. However, there are also many areas of difference, some at the level of principle and others at the level of strategy. Underlying the three approaches are variant views of the nature of young children's needs, interests, and modes of learning that lead to contrasts in the ways that teachers interact with children in the classroom, frame and structure learning experiences for children, and follow the children through observation/documentation. The article ends with discussion of the methods that researchers apply to analyze the strengths and weaknesses of each approach.

Language: English

ISSN: 1524-5039

Article

The Project Approach [Reggio Emilia]

Publication: The National Montessori Reporter, vol. 22, no. 3

Pages: 7

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Language: English

Article

'Fine Designs' from Italy: Montessori Education and the Reggio Emilia Approach

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 15, no. 1

Pages: 34

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Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Care Givers’ Knowledge of Integrating the Montessori; Indigenous Communicative Teaching Methods and Reggio Emilia in Early Child Care Education

Available from: African Journals Online

Publication: AFRREV IJAH: An International Journal of Arts and Humanities, vol. 6, no. 3

Pages: 127-140

Africa, Indigenous communities, Indigenous peoples, Nigeria, Sub-Saharan Africa, West Africa

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Abstract/Notes: Studies have identified the mismatch between theory and practice as the main reason for gap between the intended and the achieved curriculum objectives. The early childcare education is no exception. Theories of child development emphasize that children learn best through play and self-discovery. Unfortunately, research results revealed that caregivers do not adhere to the prescribed pedagogy and since pedagogy stems from the theory of the nature of the learner and how he learns; it implies that failure to use the right pedagogy adversely affects the achievement of the objectives. The study therefore sought to identify caregivers’ knowledge of integrating Montessori, Indigenous Communicative Teaching and Reggio Emilia approaches in Early Childhood Care Education in Owerri Educational zone, Imo State, Nigeria. The study is a descriptive survey with the population comprising all caregivers in government approved pre-primary schools totalling 119, using a 39-item questionnaire and percentages as well as chi square for data analyses. Results showed that respondents were not knowledgeable. Recommendations include the need to monitor caregivers to ensure compliance to stipulated policy.Keywords: childcare education, caregivers

Language: English

DOI: 10.4314/ijah.v6i3.11

ISSN: 2227-5452

Master's Thesis

The Contribution of the Montessori Approach to Multisensory Approaches to Early Learning Disabilities

Available from: University of Witwatersrand - Institutional Repository

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Abstract/Notes: Learning disabilities have become of increasing concern for educators. More and more children are having difficulty learning to read and write. This dissertation investigates what constitutes a learning disability, its etiology and whether or not it is possible to identify these disabilities in early childhood. The investigation further aims to discover if these learning disabilities are comprised of sub-disabilities and if these can be identified as such. To this end the research aims to determine the most appropriate remedial intervention strategies used for learning disabilities. Multisensory intervention is therefore explored. On the basis of this the Montessori Method is examined to ascertain whether or not the method can contribute to multisensory intervention at the preschool level. It is argued that the Montessori Method is admirably suited to making such a contribution. Further empirical research for these claims is indicated.

Language: English

Published: Johannesburg, South Africa, 2006

Book Section

Organization of Early Childhood Education Based on Montessori Approach in Thai Social Context

Book Title: Issues and Innovations in Thai Education: A Collection of Research

Asia, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Montessori method of education, Southeast Asia, Thailand

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Abstract/Notes: Previously published in International Journal of Early Childhood Education (vol. 9, no. 1).

Language: English

Published: Bangkok, Thailand: Chulalongkorn University, 2004

ISBN: 974-13-3097-9 978-974-13-3097-3

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Teaching Effectiveness in the Utilization of Montessori Approach in Early Childhood Basic Science Learning in Ika South Local Government Area (LGA) in Delta State

Available from: Center for Humanities and Innovation Studies

Publication: International Journal of Humanities and Innovation (IJHI), vol. 6, no. 1

Pages: 26-31

Africa, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, Nigeria, Science - Study and teaching, Sub-Saharan Africa, West Africa

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Abstract/Notes: Most learners find science challenging, which may be because of the methodology used in the early years that presents it as difficult and abstract. On the other hand, the Montessori Method uses a hands-on approach to teaching science from the early years. This study, therefore, looks at the effect of the teachers' utilization of the Montessori approach to early childhood education in Ika South Local Government Area (LGA) of Delta State, Nigeria. Two research questions and hypotheses were raised. The research design adopted for the study was a descriptive, pre-test, post-test, quasi-experimental method used to test the differences between the pupils' learning experiences in the two groups. The Taro Yamane formula was used to get the sample size, and a stratified random sampling technique was used to select 77 teachers and 40 nursery pupils, comprising ten each in experimental and control groups, in two schools in Ika South LGA of Delta State. The instruments to be used for this study will be self-designed multiple-choice achievement test questions in early years' science and four-point Likert-type self-structured questionnaires. The result indicates that teachers' knowledge and utilization of the Montessori approach to teaching pre-primary science is more effective than the conventional teaching method. Some suggestions were made for the way forward

Language: English

DOI: 10.33750/ijhi.v6i1.177

ISSN: 2614-6169

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