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Article

Il metodo Montessori in Africa

Publication: La Voce dell'Africa

Pages: 9-10

Africa

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Language: Italian

ISSN: 0049-6626

Book Section

Bericht über die Montessori-Pädagogik in Afrika (1968-1976) [Report on Montessori Education in Africa (1968-1976)]

Book Title: Die Montessori-Pädagogik und das behinderte Kind: Referate und Ergebnisse des 18. Internationalen Montessori Kongresses (München, 4-8 Juli 1977) [Montessori Pedagogy and the Handicapped Child: Papers and Results of the 18th International Montessori Congress (Munich, July 4-8, 1977)]

Pages: 384-386

Africa, Conferences, East Africa, Ethiopia, Ghana, International Montessori Congress (18th, Munich, Germany, 4-8 July 1977), Kenya, Mauritania, Montessori method of education - History, Nigeria, Seychelles, Somalia

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Language: German

Published: München: Kindler, 1978

ISBN: 3-463-00716-9

Doctoral Dissertation

Égwú Àmàlà: Women in Traditional Performing Arts in Ogbaruland

Available from: University of Pittsburgh ETD

Africa, Indigenous communities, Indigenous peoples, Sub-Saharan Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa, West Africa

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Abstract/Notes: Within the complex dynamics of gender relationships and roles among African peoples, women often exercise power through song and dance. Such is the case among the women of Ogbaruland in southern Nigeria who, in their performance of the dance drama Égwú Àmàlà , act as custodians of knowledge and tradition and as transmitters of culture.Apart from being a repository of information about artistic traditions, the genre also documents and enacts the history and culture of the Ogbaru people. Égwú Àmàlà, which is the subject of my dissertation, is the most popular of all Ogbaru women dance genres. The term Égwú Àmàlà literally means "paddle dance" or "paddle drama," but it is often referred to as the "mermaid dance" or égwú mmili, that is, "water dance" because of its ritualistic associations with Onye-mmili, the water divinity. This genre is predominantly performed by women of all ages, with men playing secondary roles such as òpì(gourd horn) player and paddlers of canoes when the genre is performed in the river setting. My study of Égwú Àmàlà will add to a small but growing body of literature demonstrating how gender, a locus classicus for debates in contemporary scholarship, relates to other domains of culture such as musical performance, and how gender constructions can be articulated as well as negotiated in the genre and through the performing arts in general. Since the origin and performance of Égwú Àmàlà revolves around rituals and water, this dissertation also discusses the religious dimensions of the genre, stressing the importance of water to the dance, to the Ogbaru people and to African traditional religion as well. Considering the fact that women have for decades preserved Égwú Àmàlà, which epitomizes the culture and traditions of the Ogbaru people, the present investigation represents a significant contribution to ethnomusicological, gender, and cultural studies. [Excerpt: "With the ecclesiastical permission of the Holy See, Mother Mary Magdalen Charles Walker left her home country of Ireland in response to the request of Bishop Joseph Shanahan to serve the people of God in Calabar, southern Nigeria. Her focus was the education of children and helping to improve the lives of women in the area. She established the first Montessori School in Calabar – Convent school, which became an exemplary educational institution in West Africa." p. 54]

Language: English

Published: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 2008

Article

Nurturing the Child's Spirit through Literature: An African-American Resource Guide

Publication: The National Montessori Reporter, vol. 29, no. 1

Pages: 26–31

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Language: English

Article

How About Working in Africa?

Publication: Montessori International, vol. 76

Pages: 2

Africa, ⛔ No DOI found

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Language: English

ISSN: 1470-8647

Article

Predominantly Black Institutions and Public Montessori Schools: Reclaiming the “Genius” in African American Children

Available from: De Gruyter

Publication: Multicultural Learning and Teaching, vol. 13, no. 1

Pages: Article 20170007

, Montessori approach

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Abstract/Notes: There are more than 22,000 Montessori schools in over 100 countries worldwide. Beginning in the 1950s the American Montessori movement was primarily a private pre-school movement. There are more than 5,000 schools in the United States; over 500 of these are public. Montessori schools are an increasingly popular choice in the U.S. for public school districts looking to improve their educational outcomes. Predominantly Black Institutions (PBIs) can play a pivotal role by integrating Montessori education within their teacher preparation programs. As the demand for Montessori education increases there will be a need for more highly-qualified, culturally and linguistically diverse teachers who have the appropriate credentials and can implement the Montessori approach. Scientific research confirms that children who attend Montessori schools are advantaged academically, socially and emotionally. Communities such as Milwaukee and Chicago are now implementing Montessori education through public schools as part of school reform efforts making the educational approach more accessible to African American children.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1515/mlt-2017-0007

ISSN: 2161-2412

Article

Report on the Societies in Different Countries

Publication: Communications (Association Montessori Internationale, 195?-2008), vol. 1979, no. 2/3

Africa, Muriel I. Dwyer - Writings, South Africa, Southern Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa, ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Three Montessori schools in Johannesburg - Sandton clinic day care centre - openend May 1976. Dwyer, Wikramaratne and Bryan visited South Africa for three weeks and gave lectures in Johannesurg, Durban, and Pietermaritzburg. Refers to Montessori Society of South Africa.

Language: English

ISSN: 0519-0959

Article

The Origins and Development of Child-Centred Education: Implications for Classroom Management

Available from: Sabinet African Journals

Publication: Educare (South Africa), vol. 32, no. 1-2

Pages: 222-239

Africa, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Montessori method of education - History, South Africa, Southern Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa, ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Since 1994 far-reaching curriculum changes in the form of an Outcomes-based Education (OBE) approach to schooling have been put into practice in South Africa. One of the pillars of OBE is a child (learner)-centred approach, that has an impact on virtually every aspect of classroom management. The question that arises is: what is a child-centred approach and what are its implications for classroom management? This article traces the broad issues surrounding the origins of a child-centred approach and investigates the implications of the implementation of a child-centred approach for classroom management. It concludes that child-centred teaching is still more rhetoric than reality in South Africa, because of certain constraints faced by educators. Constraints educators have to deal with in their classrooms, such as class size and inadequate training label education as child-conscious rather than child-centred.

Language: English

ISSN: 0256-8829

Article

Elaborata dal Centro Montessori di Bergamo una Carta educativa per l'Africa

Publication: Vita dell'Infanzia (Opera Nazionale Montessori), vol. 13, no. 6-7

Pages: 41

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Language: Italian

ISSN: 0042-7241

Article

Montessori in the Developing World - 33 Years of Experience in Africa

Publication: Montessori Articles (Montessori Australia Foundation)

⛔ No DOI found

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Language: English

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