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Doctoral Dissertation

The Feasibility of Montessorian Education in the Primary School: An Historico-Educational Exposition

Available from: University of South Africa - Institutional Repository

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Abstract/Notes: Maria Montessori's work was initiated in 1898 as a result of her becoming acutely aware of deficient children's learning patterns, while working at the Psychiatric clinic of the University of Rome. The principles which dominate the system, however, did not spring in full panoply from Montessori. Indeed, her inspiration came largely from early and mid-nineteenth century writings of two French physicians, Itard and Seguin, who were Also involved in the teaching of deficient children. Extending on the ideas of these two educator-physicians, as well as the ideas of Froebel, Montessori innovatively brought the child's senses into contact with carefully selected didactic apparatus in a carefully structured and ordered environment. According to Montessori, the liberty of the child is a prerequisite for self-education and forms the first major pillar of her didactic theory, and thus becomes the focus of the first chapter dealing with her didactic approach (chapter three). Montessori believed that the function of education was to assist growth and if the individual child was given the liberty of movement within a prepared environment, a sense of competence would be achieved and the learning of the child would come about almost spontaneously. The principles of individuality and the training of the senses comprise the other two pillars, and form the basis for chapter four and five respectively. The principle of individuality is rooted in the belief that each child has a uniqueness which cannot be ignored without irretrievable damage to his personality. The current educational situation in South Africa, reveals a diversity of educational problems as a result of different ethnic and cultural groups all being thrust into a common educational system. The insidious pressures of conformity to a single standard of education must of necessity lead to a compromise of standards. The exposure of educational deficiencies inherent in such a move is characterised by learning impediments and deficiencies in the educational scenario. Research has therefore been undertaken in an attempt to extract those aspects that could provide meaningful pedagogic assistance to meet a present educational need.

Language: English

Published: Pretoria, South Africa, 1994

Article

Philosophically-Based Alternatives in Education: An Exploration of Learner-Centered, Progressive, and Holistic Education

Publication: Encounter: Education for Meaning and Social Justice, vol. 17, no. 1

Pages: 17-27

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Abstract/Notes: Based on a database of over 500 resources, this paper explores the educational alternatives that exist today between the cracks of mainstream education and culture. It presents information about the growing numbers of schools and education centers that call themselves learner-centered, progressive, and/or holistic. Sources of data for this summary report also include over 3 years of informal interviews with and observations of people at alternative schools. The paper begins by examining terminology issues, discussing qualities for distinguishing educational alternatives, and describing eight types of schools (democratic and free schools, folk education, Quaker schools, homeschooling/unschooling/deschooling, Krishnamurti schools, Montessori schools, open schools, and Waldorf schools). It also presents frameworks for education (maps for understanding the territories of alternatives), and it discusses the three orientations of a competency based education: transaction (progressive), self-directed (learner-centered), and transformation (holistic). After looking at political issues around school choice which could impact the growth of the various philosophical alternatives, the paper concludes that in a society where issues of pluralism and diversity are valued as part of creating a more sustainable world and just democracy, the diversity of philosophical perspectives in education needs to be acknowledged. (Contains 41 references.) (SM)

Language: English

ISSN: 1094-3838, 2158-8414

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Efficacy of Montessori and Traditional Method of Education on Self-Concept Development of Children

Available from: Journal Issues

Publication: International Journal of Educational Policy Research and Review, vol. 3, no. 2

Pages: 29-35

Asia, India, Maria Montessori - Biographic sources, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., South Asia

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Abstract/Notes: Montessori is a method of education started by Maria Montessori in 1903 for the educationally backward children; after finding its efficacy on them it was thought that it even well suits for the normal children. It became very popular throughout the world in the 20th century and has been implemented both in private and public institutions. Based on certain principles it is evident in many of the researches conducted so far that the Montessori education is conducive for the overall development in social, emotional and cognitive components of children. With this background the present study was conducted to explore the effect of Montessori education on social development in terms of self-concept of the children as compared to the children of traditional method of education. Using descriptive and parametric tests for the obtained data it was found that the Montessori children have very high self-concept than the traditional children. Percentage result shows that the traditional children’s self-concept ranges from low to high category and the Montessori children’s self-concept ranges from high and very high, which indicated marked difference between them in self-concept. According to independent samples t-test results there was a statistical significant difference between the Montessori children group and the traditional children group, the Montessori children are found to have higher self-concept.

Language: English

DOI: 10.15739/IJEPRR.16.005

ISSN: 2360-7076

Doctoral Dissertation

Listening to Young Learners: Applying the Montessori Method to English as an Additional Language (EAL) Education

Available from: British Librarty - EthOS

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Abstract/Notes: With the current immigration and migration trends in Europe and worldwide, English as an Additional Language (EAL) education is becoming a prominent area of educational research. The discourse around EAL and social justice education has, until now, largely focused on primary, secondary, and post compulsory aged students. Preschool aged EAL children have been left out of the academic discourse. Pedagogical approaches need to be explored to marry EAL and social justice for preschool children. Maria Montessori’s pedagogical approach may be able to achieve this unity without compromising the language development that is desired. The following study is a piece of action research, applying the Montessori Method to a group of nine EAL children in the Canton of Zürich, Switzerland. The data gathered suggests that applying Montessori’s approach to EAL education, that of listening to the child and being attentive to hisher needs, gives autonomy to the student, and can promote social justice in preschool EAL education. Listening to the child occurs through ‘observation’ (attentiveness to the child), critical reflection of practice, and experimentation in education. In this way each child receives a customized education that has, at its foundation, respect for the child. Using ‘observation,’ field notes, and researcher reflections, it became apparent that young children are able to communicate their educational needs. TESOL outcomes were used to monitor the rate at which English was learned. Each language journey was vastly different, but regardless of the initial outcomes met, all children demonstrated increases in their comprehension and spoken English. It is important to recognize that children must be listened to and should be considered valued members in their education. https://doi.org/10.17635/lancaster/thesis/40

Language: English

Published: Lancashire, England, 2017

Book

The Advanced Montessori Method: Scientific Pedagogy as Applied to the Education of Children from Seven to Eleven Years. Volume 1, Spontaneous Activity in Education

Maria Montessori - Writings, Montessori method of education

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Language: English

Published: Oxford, England: Clio, 1991

Edition: 1st Clio ed.

ISBN: 1-85109-114-9 978-1-85109-114-0

Series: The Clio Montessori series , 9

Volume: 1 of 2

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

The Effect of Montessori And Traditional Methods of Education on Emotional Intelligence of Children

Available from: European Journal of Education Studies

Publication: European Journal of Education Studies, vol. 3, no. 4

Pages: 367-382

Asia, India, South Asia

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Abstract/Notes: The Montessori Method of education is becoming more popular in Indian cities in the recent decades. The parents, educationists and policy makers are keenly interested in the overall development of their children or stakeholders. Since its inception, the Montessori Method of education is adopting several procedures based on its basic principles of cognitive, social and emotional development of the children. Although every principle of Montessori education is not followed in the Indian Montessori schools, the schools are adhering to several of them. The present article adopted comparative analyses to determine the effect of Montessori and traditional method of education on emotional intelligence of the school children. A total sample of 1082 children between the age group of 12 – 16 years was selected from the schools of Montessori and traditional education. The data were collected using the Bar-on, (1997, 2000) Emotional Intelligence scale with Likert response patterns ranging 1 to 5. The obtained data was subjected to ‘t’ test analysis and it was evident in the result findings that the children of Montessori method of education has significantly higher emotional intelligence than the children of traditional method on the total and as well on all dimensions of emotional intelligence. This highlights the education intervention method having strong bearing on emotional development of the children. Further, the findings related to gender effect provides inconclusive results both with Montessori and traditional children.

Language: English

DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.399050

ISSN: 2501-1111

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

The New Curriculum of Education in Kenya: a Linguistic and Education Paradigm Shift

Available from: eRepository at University of Nairobi, Kenya

Publication: International Journal of Novel Research in Education and Learning, vol. 5, no. 1

Pages: 15-27

Africa, East Africa, Kenya, Sub-Saharan Africa, ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: The current system of education in Kenya is the 8-4-4 structure, where children study for eight years of Basic (primary) education, four years of Secondary education and four years of University education. This system was introduced in 1985 to promote man-power capable of performing blue collar jobs, as compared to the former 7-6-3 system that targeted developing a local workforce to replace the British workforce who largely held white collar jobs in the new, independent Kenya. However, over the years, the 8-4-4 curriculum has been widely criticised for a myriad of reasons. The criticisms against this curriculum are that it is too heavily loaded with content, purely examinations-oriented, and generally violating the Rights of the Child by placing undue physical and psychological pressure on learners. In order to address this problem therefore, a new curriculum was hastily crafted and taken through a rushed pilot drive in April 2017 and is expected to replace the current 8-4-4 system by January 2018. Admittedly, this new education system addresses some of the weaknesses of the current 8-4-4 education system, since it is competency-based and focuses more on skills acquisition as opposed to a purely knowledge-based acquisition system. The issues addressed in this paper is how this new and hurriedly crafted curriculum (as well as the introduction of Free Secondary School Education) will be implemented by teachers who are yet to come to terms with the new paradigm shift of teaching and learning. The second issue addressed is whether the crafters of this system took into consideration children’s rights, or whether at all, the system was crafted from a child-centred perspective. The concerns are that apart from the manner in which this syllabus was been crafted and planned for implementation, if not reviewed comprehensively may not only violate the rights of future generations of children, but also enhance negative ethnicity from a linguistic perspective

Language: English

ISSN: 2394-9686

Report

Alternatives in Education: An Exploration of Learner-Centered, Progressive, and Holistic Education

Available from: ERIC

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Abstract/Notes: Based on a database of over 500 resources, this paper explores the educational alternatives that exist today between the cracks of mainstream education and culture. It presents information about the growing numbers of schools and education centers that call themselves learner-centered, progressive, and/or holistic. Sources of data for this summary report also include over 3 years of informal interviews with and observations of people at alternative schools. The paper begins by examining terminology issues, discussing qualities for distinguishing educational alternatives, and describing eight types of schools (democratic and free schools, folk education, Quaker schools, homeschooling/unschooling/deschooling, Krishnamurti schools, Montessori schools, open schools, and Waldorf schools). It also presents frameworks for education (maps for understanding the territories of alternatives), and it discusses the three orientations of a competency based education: transaction (progressive), self-directed (learner-centered), and transformation (holistic). After looking at political issues around school choice which could impact the growth of the various philosophical alternatives, the paper concludes that in a society where issues of pluralism and diversity are valued as part of creating a more sustainable world and just democracy, the diversity of philosophical perspectives in education needs to be acknowledged. (Contains 41 references.) (SM)

Language: English

Published: New Orleans, Louisiana, 2002

Doctoral Dissertation

A Comparison of Academic Achievement of Students Taught by the Montessori Method and by Traditional Methods of Instruction in the Elementary Grades

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

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Abstract/Notes: The problem of this study was to determine if there is a significant difference between the academic achievement scores of students in grades 2 through 5 who are taught with the Montessori method of instruction and those students who are taught with traditional methods of instruction in the Helena Public Schools. Analyses used a two-way ANOVA; method and gender as well as method and aptitude were examined. The level of significance was set at alpha =.05. A matching technique was used to match Montessori students with students from traditional classrooms by the independent variables of grade, aptitude, gender, socioeconomic conditions, and handicapping conditions. The study also examined if there was a significant difference between the aptitude of all students in Montessori classrooms and all students in traditional classrooms. The population studied was second, third, fourth, and fifth grade students during the spring of 1996. A total of 120 students was used in the study of academic achievement. There were 145 F-tests conducted in this study. At the second grade level, students from traditional classrooms scored significantly higher than students in Montessori classrooms in mathematics computation and mathematics concepts and applications. Also at the second grade, when aptitude was taken into consideration, Montessori low aptitude students scored significantly higher in vocabulary than low aptitude students in traditional classrooms. There were no significant findings in any of the subtests at the third and fourth grade levels. At the fifth grade level, Montessori students scored significantly higher in language expression and social studies. Interaction was found with aptitude in language expression and with gender in science. A comparison of the aptitude of all Montessori students to all students from traditional classrooms revealed that Montessori students scored significantly higher. The overall results of this study show that the Montessori method of instruction and the traditional method of instruction provide students with comparable achievement test scores. A longitudinal study is recommended to examine the long-term effects of academic achievement of those students taught by the Montessori method of instruction.

Language: English

Published: Bozeman, Montana, 1997

Doctoral Dissertation

The New Education Fellowship and the Reconstruction of Education: 1945 to 1966

Available from: UCL

Educational change, Europe, New Education Fellowship, New Education Movement, Theosophical Society, Theosophy

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Abstract/Notes: During the 1920s and 1930s, the New Education Fellowship (NEF), founded in 1919, established itself as an important international force for radical education and educational experimentation. Its membership was drawn from many different countries and included some of the most prominent progressive educators of that period. By 1945, however, the movement was experiencing international decline. Membership had fallen and in many countries the new educational network had ceased to exist. This situation was a result not only of the destruction of the new educational network in Europe during the Second World War, but also of the change in the outlook of educationists and reformers who sought new solutions to the problems of the reconstruction of society and education. The purpose of this study is to explore the NEF's importance as a disseminator of educational and political ideals after 1945 and its contribution to debates about the post-war reconstruction of education and society, using the considerable but currently little-researched material held at the Institute of Education, University of London. This thesis examines the NEF's network after 1945 and considers how far the NEF successfully extended its membership amongst school teachers and educationists at teacher training colleges. The NEF also sought to develop an international network. The international activities of the NEF, both through links with other organisations, for example, the United Nations Educational, Social and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO), and its membership in those countries where the NEF maintained branches are explored in order to gauge the success of the NEF as a movement with internationalist ambitions.

Language: English

Published: London, England, 2009

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