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Book

Montessori for Every Family: A Practical Parenting Guide to Living, Loving and Learning

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Abstract/Notes: This beautiful, modern Montessori book for parents outlines the key principles of this parenting approach and shows you how you can easily apply this at home. It provides a valuable starting point for parents to help them create a family life inspired by the ethos of Montessori. This practical parenting guide makes Montessori accessible to every parent and child, regardless of time pressures and resources. It includes: – Outlines of the Montessori principles clearly and succinctly: respect, freedom, curiosity, creativity, responsibility and independence. – Examples on how to apply these principles to everyday life – with sections on breakfast time, school/daycare drop off, school/daycare pick up, playtime, meal times, homework time, bath time and bedtime. – Demonstrations of how to apply Montessori techniques to an older child new to Montessori and how to flex and build on the techniques as your child grows up. Montessori is a unique educational philosophy created by Maria Montessori that fosters the growth of the whole child. From enjoying nature together to free time and weekends, every aspect of family life is an opportunity for meaningful engagement with your child. Montessori For Every Family offers you pragmatic, real-life advice, suitable for children of all ages, showing you how easy and natural it is to create a nourishing and empowering environment at home for everyone. Even if your child won’t go to a Montessori school, a Montessori home can still be an invaluable bridge to reinforcing your child’s natural curiosity and setting the foundation for lifelong learning. This is the only Montessori book that recognizes that most parents don’t have the time and resources to overhaul their lives to fully embrace a parenting philosophy, but instead need practical, immediate guidance that is effective.

Language: English

Published: New York: DK, 2021

ISBN: 978-0-7440-3374-8

Doctoral Dissertation

Educational Ideas and Practices of Rabindranath Tagore and Maria Montessori: A Comparative Analysis

Available from: Shodhganga: Indian Theses

Asia, India, Rabindranath Tagore, South Asia

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Abstract/Notes: Rabindranath Tagore and Maria Montessori were two great educationists of the two continents of the world. This study compared the ideals and practices of both these pioneers in the field of education. The objectives of the study were to analyze the similarities and differences in the educational philosophies of Rabindranath Tagore and Maria Montessori, to study the aims, curriculum and methods of education as propounded by them and to find out the relevance of their educational doctrines in the present day education system. Methodology: A philosophical and historical research was conducted by the researcher. The data were collected from the various primary and secondary sources. The collected data were analyzed by ensuring the internal and external criticism of the various sources. Findings of the Study: Tagore and Montessori’s educational thoughts were inspired by the static conditions of the then prevalent traditional educational systems. Their pedagogical approaches stressed on the needs and interests of the child. Rabindranath Tagore’s approach towards evolution of an educational philosophy was his vision as a poet and his institution was an extension of his work of art. Maria Montessori’s educational theory was based on science and her institution was a pedagogical laboratory for her. Rabindranath Tagore’s poetic vision enabled him to devise a unique learning environment at Santiniketan based on the concept of ancient Indian ideals. Rabindranath asserted his mission to promote global peace and universal brotherhood through the creation of Visva-Bharati. Through Sriniketan Tagore tried to address the needs of rural India. Maria Montessori through scientific observation evolved learning materials in a classroom environment that fostered children’s natural desire to learn from ‘Children’s House’. She developed the Montessori Method, which was eventually adopted throughout the world. Living through the years of violent war and political upheaval, also inspired her to espouse the cause of peace education. The conclusion that the researcher could draw from the study was that though the educational practices of both these educators were different, there are many parallel ideas in their educational ideals and thoughts. Their innovative methods of teaching are still relevant in the present day education.

Language: English

Published: Kolkata, India, 2017

Book

The Best Weapon for Peace: Maria Montessori, Education, and Children's Rights

Asia, Croce Bianca, Displaced communities, Europe, Fascism, India, Italy, Maria Montessori - Biographic sources, Maria Montessori - Speeches, addresses, etc., Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Montessori method of education - History, Pacifism

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Abstract/Notes: The Italian educator and physician Maria Montessori (1870–1952) is best known for the teaching method that bears her name. She was also a lifelong pacifist, although historians tend to consider her writings on this topic as secondary to her pedagogy. In The Best Weapon for Peace, Erica Moretti reframes Montessori’s pacifism as the foundation for her educational activism, emphasizing her vision of the classroom as a gateway to reshaping society. Montessori education offers a child-centered learning environment that cultivates students’ development as peaceful, curious, and resilient adults opposed to war and invested in societal reform.   Using newly discovered primary sources, Moretti examines Montessori’s lifelong pacifist work, including her ultimately unsuccessful push for the creation of the White Cross, a humanitarian organization for war-affected children. Moretti shows that Montessori’s educational theories and practices would come to define chilren’s rights once adopted by influential international organizations, including the United Nations. She uncovers the significance of Montessori’s evolving philosophy of peace and early childhood education within broader conversations about internationalism and humanitarianism.

Language: English

Published: Madison, Wisconsin: University of Wisconsin Press, 2021

Edition: 1st edition

ISBN: 978-0-299-33310-2

Series: George L. Mosse Series in the History of European Culture, Sexuality, and Ideas

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

Montessori in the Home and Connections to Parent Education

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

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Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this study was to make more connections from the school to home environment and allow for more parent education opportunities. There were six families included in the study. Home visits were conducted prior to school starting to gain a better understanding about the child’s current home environment. Each week small workbags containing suggestions and pictures on how to organize the home environment, sample fine motor activities from the classroom environment, articles about child development or Montessori, and resources were sent home to families. The families kept these bags for a week and then returned them with a feedback form. Data collection was gathered through pre/post surveys with feedback forms, and observations of morning drop off with parent and child. The findings of this study support prior research in that parents actively engaged with their child’s educational journey will help to support their child in more meaningful ways in the home environment. Through analyzing and summarizing my findings this study provides parents and teachers with more resources on how to successfully implement a variety of parent education tools throughout the beginning of the school year.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2014

Doctoral Dissertation

Montessori in India: A Study of the Application of her Method in a Developing Country

Available from: University of Sydney Libraries

Asia, Ceylon, India, Maria Montessori - Biographic sources, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., South Asia, Sri Lanka, Theosophical Society, Theosophy

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Abstract/Notes: In India the Montessori Method has survived in various forms for a continuous period longer than virtually anywhere else in the world. Its adoption coincided with a crucial period in the nation's history when a growing nationalist movement was seeking to rid the country of foreign domination and dependency. Although the Method was foreign, the emphasis on liberty and the development of individuals capable of independent thought and action appealed to elite groups and to elements of the nationalist movement. The Method was believed to be modern and scientific and was greeted with enthusiasm by those who sought modernization and progress in a traditional society. Late in life Maria Montessori, accompanied by her son Mario, visited India, and her presence over a period of almost nine years from 1939-46 and 1947-49 gave a boost to the growing Montessori movement. Whilst in India, Montessori gave full voice to the spiritualism inherent in her work. In the West she was considered eccentric and her Method out of date, but in India, where religion exerted a powerful and pervasive influence, she was consistent with an ancient tradition of religious educators. A sprinkling of Indians had always attended her international training courses abroad, and in India they flocked to hear her message of human regeneration through the child. The Montessori Method was largely patronized by a relatively affluent, Westernized and urbanized elite who could afford the expensive apparatus. Gandhi, however, had urged Montessori to devise materials in accordance with the economic and social conditions prevailing in India's villages. Although she found much time during the years in India to develop her Method further to cover the period from birth to three years and from six to twelve years, she appears to have given little thought to its application among the country's largely illiterate poor who comprised the bulk of the population. However, an "Indianized" Montessori movement emerged in Western India, allied to the Gandhian nationalist movement, which became concerned with "adapting" the Method according to Gandhian principles, and applying it in the villages. The resultant hybrid pre-primary education enjoyed widespread application in post-Independence India and received recognition at the national level by government and non-government agencies. Recently it has been afforded a crucial role in a major human resources development programme designed to alleviate the effects of poverty amongst women and young children. The present study has drawn on a wide range of primary and secondary sources including archival material, newspapers, journals, published and unpublished correspondence, and personal interviews to trace the history of the Montessori movement in India from the time of early interest in the Method in 1912. The early chapters provide an introduction to Montessori's life and work and an historical background to the adoption of the Method. The application of the Method and the expansion of the Montessori movement is explored in subsequent chapters and, finally, in chapters six and seven, the study discusses directions in the movement after the departure of Madame Montessori and her son in 1949.

Language: English

Published: Sydney, Australia, 1987

Doctoral Dissertation

Development of the Early Childhood Curricular Beliefs Inventory: An Instrument to Identify Preservice Teachers' Early Childhood Curricular Orientation

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

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Abstract/Notes: The aim of this study was to develop and field test an instrument that provides an efficient and scholarly tool for exploring curricular beliefs of preservice teachers in the area of early childhood education. The Early Childhood Curricular Beliefs Inventory (ECCBI) was developed through procedures that evaluated the content validity of identified statements, explored the criterion and construct validity, and assessed the internal reliability of the instrument. Through a literature review, four predominant approaches to early childhood education (Developmental Interaction, Cognitive Developmental, Behavioral, and Sensory Cognitive) and four associated models of implementation were identified (Developmental Interaction, HighScope, Direct Instruction, and Montessori). Six areas, in which each of the above differed, were identified: the view of the child, role of the teacher, resources utilized, curricular emphasis, assessment methodology, and characteristics of the learning environment. The aim of this study was to develop and field test an instrument that provides an efficient and scholarly tool for exploring curricular beliefs of preservice teachers in the area of early childhood education. The Early Childhood Curricular Beliefs Inventory (ECCBI) was developed through procedures that evaluated the content validity of identified statements, explored the criterion and construct validity, and assessed the internal reliability of the instrument. Through a literature review, four predominant approaches to early childhood education (Developmental Interaction, Cognitive Developmental, Behavioral, and Sensory Cognitive) and four associated models of implementation were identified (Developmental Interaction, HighScope, Direct Instruction, and Montessori). Six areas, in which each of the above differed, were identified: the view of the child, role of the teacher, resources utilized, curricular emphasis, assessment methodology, and characteristics of the learning environment. A panel of experts classified and sorted a total of 182 statements, and 72 items were subsequently organized into an instrument consisting of four subtests corresponding to the identified curricular models. Scoring of the instrument included recording Likert-scale responses for each statement to a score key divided into four sections, or subtests, representing each curricular model. Scores for each section were added and compared. The subtest with the lowest score was deemed most representative of a respondent's curricular beliefs. Data gathered through field testing of the instrument with practitioners were used to explore further content validity through a factor analysis, criterion validity, and construct validity. Results of a second field test of preservice teachers and the results of the first field test (practitioners) were used to assess internal consistency reliability. Analyses appeared to support content, criterion, and construct validity as well as reliability of the 72-item ECCBI. In an effort to reduce the length of the instrument and to make it less cumbersome, results of the factor analysis were used to create a 24-item shortened version of the ECCBI. Six items representing each of the four subtests having the strongest factor loadings were identified as appropriate statements and were then organized into an alternative instrument. Data gathered through field testing of the instrument with practitioners were used to explore further content validity through a factor analysis, criterion validity, and construct validity. Results of a second field test of preservice teachers and the results of the first field test (practitioners) were used to assess internal consistency reliability. Analyses appeared to support content, criterion, and construct validity as well as reliability of the 72-item ECCBI. In an effort to reduce the length of the instrument and to make it less cumbersome, results of the factor analysis were used to create a 24-item shortened version of the ECCBI. Six items representing each of the four subtests having the strongest factor loadings were identified as appropriate statements and were then organized into an alternative instrument.

Language: English

Published: Tallahassee, Florida, 2004

Article

Maria Montessori du côté de enfance [Maria Montessori from the childhood side]

Available from: Università di Macerata

Publication: History of Education and Children's Literature (HECL), vol. 1, no. 2

Pages: 231-247

Maria Montessori - Biographic sources, Maria Montessori - Philosophy, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc.

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Abstract/Notes: Following the more recent and up-to-date literary criticism, the article outlines the biog- raphy and the complicated cultural and scientific route of Maria Montessori. The main stages of her psycho-pedagogical works are underlined, as well as the origin and develop- ment of the enterprise she furthered in special education and in children’s care. Through the analysis of a large review of both traditional and recent studies about Maria Montessori and her work, it stands out the Montessorian conception of a scientific pedagogy. This one, based on the Positivistic culture, is not extraneous to other influences, such as the Itard’s Sensism, and the theosophical suggestions about an aesthetic and moral perfecting of the human being through the exercising of his sensibility. The Montessori’s idea of spir- itual embryo can be referred to the Neo-evolutionist theories and to religious contamina- tions from different sources. It is so possible to outline the eclectic connotation of the anthropological – and then psycho-pedagogical – thought that the researcher and peda- gogue Maria Montessori had worked out.

Language: French

ISSN: 1971-1093, 1971-1131

Article

Assistive Technology for Every Child

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 20, no. 1

Pages: 30-35

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: The Montessori philosophy advocates that the classroom be a reflection of the home, the community, and the world. Now, a century after Maria Montessori founded her Casa dei Bambini, the world is becoming a high-technology society, with computers a part of everyday American lives. Computers are almost a household necessity, and basic word-processing programs are now easier for young children to use. It is important that early childhood teachers use technology in their classrooms, and Montessori teachers integrate technology into the Montessori environment and curriculum areas. The technology requirements of the No Child Left Behind Act include resources and best practices on technology literacy and effective teaching using technology. The National Education Technology Plan (U.S. Department of Education, 2003) promotes universal access to technology for all children. Finally, the Council for Exceptional Children/Division of Early Childhood (2001) recommends that children use assistive technology to enhance their learning. Ongoing research and continued development of new and emerging technologies and assistive technologies are critical to supporting children's learning. Assistive technology--according to the Technology-Related Assistance for Individuals with Disabilities Act, Public Law 100-407 (the "Tech Act")--is defined as an item, piece of equipment, or product system that is used to increase, maintain, or improve functional capabilities of individuals with disabilities. Assistive technology also includes "low-tech" items that are enhanced and refined by present-day advances in technology. While the term "assistive technology" is new, the idea of adapting technology to fit the needs of children with and without disabilities is not. Thus, the author states that the Montessori curriculum, literacy, children's thinking, and computer literacy can be greatly enhanced using assistive technology with all children in the classroom--not just those with special needs. Social skills can also be developed if two children work together on the same technology. Assistive technology is designed to be durable and washable, to support academic and technological learning, and to facilitate each child's computer literacy skills at developmentally appropriate levels. (Contains 13 resources.)

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Assessment in Multiage Primary Classrooms

Available from: Issues in Educational Research

Publication: Issues in Educational Research, vol. 15, no. 2

Pages: 145-155

Montessori method of education - Evaluation, Nongraded schools, ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: To enable teachers to become "transformative intellectuals" (Huckle, 1996), a critical form of educational inquiry that enables them to investigate their practice, is required (Robottom, 1987). Such an approach was used in developing assessment resources and materials "with" teachers, not "for" teachers. The important thing is to help teachers help themselves by sharing with them ways of developing the tools and skills of assessment. This paper describes how I engaged teachers in a process of mobilising "assessment capital" through a participatory action research approach. This was used for the development of assessment resources and materials, in order to foster improved student engagement and learning. A case study of one school is presented in this paper. This school had multiage classes. The case study highlights the potential role of teachers as transformative intellectuals in schools. (Contains 1 table and 1 figure.)

Language: English

ISSN: 0313-7155

Book Section

La Formation des Jardinières d’Enfants, une Institutionnalisation Conflictuelle (1910-1931) [The Formation of Kindergartens, an Institutional Conflict (1910-1931)]

Available from: OpenEdition Books

Book Title: Éduquer dans et hors l’école: Lieux et milieux de formation. XVIIe-XXe siècle

Pages: 171-183

Europe, France, Western Europe

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Abstract/Notes: Les jardins d’enfants qui se développent en Europe au XIXe siècle selon les principes froëbeliens s’implantent plus difficilement en France où les salles d’asile, puis l’école maternelle instituée par Pauline Kergomard1, développent un accueil spécifique pour les enfants d’âge préscolaire. Néanmoins, ils bénéficient dès les années 1910 de l’essor mondial du montessorisme, et l’on constate la création de nombreux jardins d’enfants et d’écoles nouvelles jusqu’à l’orée de la seconde guerre mondiale. Les jardinières reçoivent une formation spécifique, centrée sur les méthodes actives prônées par les psychologues s’intéressant au développement de l’enfant, et délivrée dès le début du XXe siècle par des institutions privées. Cette formation est prise en charge par l’État entre les années 1921 et 1931, alors que Mlle Amieux, professeur au collège Sévigné, crée un cours pédagogique au lycée de jeunes filles de l’École normale de Sèvres. Les jardinières munies du certificat d’État sont ensuite embauchées dans les jardins d’enfants et les classes enfantines des lycées bourgeois. Cette expérience s’arrête en 1931 lorsque les lycées ne sont plus autorisés à ouvrir des classes enfantines, mettant ainsi un terme à l’existence des jardins d’enfants dans l’enceinte de l’enseignement secondaire. Nous verrons dans ce chapitre en quoi cette formation a été à la résultante, pas toujours harmonieuse, de l’institution scolaire et du mouvement en faveur de l’éducation des jeunes enfants, et en quoi elle a été un enjeu qui reste actuel. Quelle était cette formation spécifique, quelles raisons conduisent à son arrêt en 1931 et qu’advient-il de la formation des jardinières après cette date ? Voici les questions que nous envisageons d’explorer à travers le prisme d’une éducation préscolaire envisagée dans et hors l’école, à partir de sources provenant de fonds d’archives publics2 et privés3, complétés par des ouvrages et revues pédagogiques telles La Nouvelle Éducation, la Revue universitaire, l’Éducation enfantine ou encore la Revue de l’enseignement secondaire des jeunes filles. [Kindergartens that developed in Europe in the nineteenth century according to Froëbelian principles were more difficult to establish in France where the asylum rooms, then the nursery school instituted by Pauline Kergomard, developed a specific reception for the children of preschool age. Nonetheless, they benefited from the worldwide boom in montessorism from the 1910s onwards, and many kindergartens and new schools were established until the onset of the Second World War. The gardeners receive specific training, focused on the active methods advocated by psychologists interested in the development of the child, and delivered from the beginning of the 20th century by private institutions. This training was paid for by the State between the years 1921 and 1931, when Miss Amieux, a teacher at the Sévigné college, created an educational course at the high school for young girls of the Normal School of Sèvres. The gardeners with the state certificate are then employed in the kindergartens and nursery classes of middle-class high schools. This experiment ended in 1931 when high schools were no longer allowed to open nursery classes, thus putting an end to the existence of kindergartens within the walls of secondary education. We will see in this chapter how this training was the result, not always harmonious, of the school institution and the movement in favor of the education of young children, and how it was an issue that remains current. What was this specific training, what are the reasons for its discontinuation in 1931 and what happens to the training of gardeners after that date? Here are the questions that we plan to explore through the prism of preschool education envisaged in and outside school, using sources from public2 and private3 archival funds, supplemented by educational books and reviews such as La Nouvelle Education, the University Review, Childhood Education or the Journal of secondary education for young girls.]

Language: French

Published: Rennes, France: Presses Universitaires de Rennes, 2018

ISBN: 978-2-7535-5561-7

Series: Histoire

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