Quick Search
For faster results please use our Quick Search engine.

Advanced Search

Search across titles, abstracts, authors, and keywords.
Advanced Search Guide.

542 results

Master's Thesis

The Impact of Songs and Gestures on Bilingual Learning in a Montessori Classroom

Available from: MINDS@UW River Falls

Bilingual education, Bilingualism, Classroom environments, Educational environment, Learning environments, Montessori method of education, Nonverbal communication in education

See More

Abstract/Notes: Previous studies have examined the effects of different forms of sensory input on young learners’ cognition. This study is based on theoretical models of coding, information processing theory, and depth of processing theory. These theories suggest that multiple sources of sensory input at the time of learning establish deeper neural connections which in turn, aid in retrieval of information. This action research project examined two forms of sensory input, auditory and kinesthetic, and their effects on the retention and recall of novel French vocabulary words. Phase I of the experiment tested the effects of gestures on recall of vocabulary words while reciting a poem. Phase II examined the impact of singing on vocabulary recall. It was hypothesized that both gestures and songs would positively effect retention and recall of novel French vocabulary. This study also considers theories of bilingual learning and second language acquisition in early childhood learning environments. Specifically, comparisons are made between simultaneous and sequential bilingualism and the home and school environment respectively. Previous research in the field of second language acquisition suggests that L2 learners build on the linguistic foundations of their native language (L1). This action research project was carried out in a private Montessori school in Northeastern Iowa. Models of bilingualism are situated within the context of Dr. Montessori’s pedagogical methods of teaching language, and this thesis provides examples of bilingual Montessori learning environments.

Language: English

Published: River Falls, Wisconsin, 2021

Article

Bringing French into the Classroom through Games

Publication: The National Montessori Reporter

Pages: 14–15

See More

Language: English

Article

Paying Attention to Details [Teacher, classroom]

Publication: The National Montessori Reporter, vol. 9, no. 1

Pages: 19

See More

Language: English

Creating a Balanced Literate Environment for the Multi-Age, Multi-Ability, Primary Classroom through Staff Development.

See More

Abstract/Notes: A practicum was designed to increase the expertise of primary teachers in the creation of developmentally appropriate reading/writing curriculum for the multi-age, multi-ability, primary classroom through literacy training staff development sessions. The system of literacy training was constructed over a period of eight months with 34 primary teachers from three elementary schools. Staff development training sessions on early literacy and authentic assessment using the running record were developed. Pre/post questionnaires, change assessment scales for administrators, a literacy plan of action for local schools, running record scripts for assessment training, literacy lessons, and developmentally appropriate curricula were administered or developed. Analysis of the data revealed that after the staff development training on early literacy and authentic assessment, the primary teachers were able to create a developmentally appropriate curriculum for reading and writing in the

Language: English

Published: Fort Lauderdale, Florida, 1994

Honors Thesis

The Changing Classroom: A Thematic Analysis on the Impacts of the Coronavirus Pandemic on Children and Educators of a Montessori School

Available from: University of Tennessee Chattanooga

See More

Abstract/Notes: The Coronavirus pandemic of 2020 has drastically changed day-to-day functioning in American culture and the outlook of many essential institutions, specifically the education system. A halt in learning for most American school children in the spring semester of 2020, as well as necessary adaptation of the day-to-day functions of educational facilities in the fall has altered the learning environment for children and educators like never before. Research on historical disruptions in education, such as natural disasters and public health crises, provide a partial framework for federal approaches to the modern-day pandemic and their potential consequences. Modern technology has provided an array of alternatives to traditional learning and family engagement, yet barriers still exist, especially in early childhood settings. Specifically in classrooms that rely on sensorial and manipulative-based learning, historically utilized in the Montessori method, online learning is simply no substitute to the potentials of in-person instruction. The purpose of this study is to investigate the evolvement of the classroom environment in response to the pandemic through the eyes of one small Montessori school and draw conclusions on how these shifts are impacting the entire wellbeing of school children, their educators and beyond. Using a qualitative thematic analysis framework and data gathered from multiple interviews conducted with teachers and faculty, my project will develop and offer overarching axial themes that may be applicable to a larger body of modern educators.

Language: English

Published: Chattanooga, Tennessee, 2021

Article

Do Multiage Classrooms Help Students Succeed?

Available from: SAGE Journals

Publication: General Music Today, vol. 12, no. 1

Pages: 28-31

Academic achievement, Americas, Early childhood care and education, Music - Instruction and study, Nongraded schools, North America, Student attitudes, United States of America

See More

Abstract/Notes: Reviews research about the effects of multiage grouping particularly focusing on the differences in achievement and attitudes between students in multiage and single-grade classes and the implications of those differences. Maintains that the value of multiage instruction rests in its ability to foster positive self-esteem and enhance student attitudes toward school. (CMK)

Language: English

DOI: 10.1177/104837139801200107

ISSN: 1048-3713

Conference Paper

The Application of Student Portfolios in Primary/Intermediate and Self-Contained/Multi-Age Team Classroom Environments: Implications for Instruction, Learning, and Assessment

Available from: ERIC

Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association

See More

Abstract/Notes: Portfolios have gained wide acceptance as a learning and assessment tool. Yet, little research has been reported on the practices of teachers who are actually using portfolios within their classrooms and how those practices are moderated by contextual variables. This research examined the instructional, learning, and assessment roles of student portfolios, and explored, from the perspective of the classroom teacher, variations in portfolio applications associated with teaching level (primary versus intermediate) and classroom environment (self-contained versus multiage/teaming). Teachers for kindergarten through grade 5 in 3 elementary schools (n=314) completed a survey questionnaire regarding the instructional and assessment uses to which portfolios are put within their classrooms. To further examine patterns of portfolio use, a subset of 44 teachers was interviewed to explore teacher perceptions about the impact of student portfolios on themselves and their students. Results suggest that these teachers make deliberate decisions regarding uses of their students' portfolios, decisions that appear heavily impacted by the maturity or skill level of the child, the purposes of the application, and the classroom environment within which the application occurs. They also depend on whether the portfolio product is in a formative state (working portfolio) or final state (performance portfolio). (Contains 7 tables and 14 references.) (Author/SLD)

Language: English

Published: Montreal, Canada, Apr 19-24, 1994

Report

Effects of the Multiage Classroom on Children

Available from: ERIC

See More

Abstract/Notes: This study examined the impact of the multiage classroom on second, third, and fourth graders in an Elkhart, Indiana elementary school. One classroom from each grade participated in the multiage classroom. The classroom of 70 students was combined for at least 1 afternoon per week during the 1995-96 school year. During February, the classroom was combined for four afternoons per week. Results indicated that students in the multiage group had better attendance than the general school population. To determine the effects of the multiage classroom on social skills, the teachers maintained a journal on six students who had not shown appropriate social behaviors in the regular classroom. A point system was implemented in which these students were rewarded with points for three desirable social skills. Four of the six target students demonstrated appropriate social skills during the time observed. Parents' responses to surveys suggested that the parents accepted the program and had a positive attitude toward it. At the beginning and end of the study period, children were surveyed orally on their attitudes to the multiage classroom. Results were mixed with regard to whether they liked to be in a multiage class. Sociometric techniques revealed that, across the time of the study, second and third graders' willingness to work with children of other ages increased, and the fourth graders' willingness declined. Appendixes contain the parent and student surveys. (KDFB)

Language: English

Published: Elkhart, Indiana, Apr 24, 1996

Book

The Elementary Child as a Member of Society: How Through Understanding and Implementation of Montessoi Principles an Adult Can Manage and Elementary Classroom to Fully Aid the Child's Development

See More

Language: English

Published: Rochester, New York: American Montessori Society, 2011

Book

The Multigrade Classroom: A Resource Handbook for Small, Rural Schools

Available from: ERIC

See More

Abstract/Notes: This handbook was written to review current research on multigrade instruction, to identify key issues faced by multigrade classroom teachers, and to offer novice teachers a set of resource guides for improving instructional quality. The first chapter reviews previous research on multigrade instruction. It addresses questions regarding the effect of multigrade instruction on student performance and the training needed to teach in a multigrade classroom. The other chapters of the handbook cover topic areas considered essential for effective multigrade instruction: (1) classroom organization; (2) classroom management and discipline; (3) instructional organization and curriculum; (4) instrucational delivery and grouping; (5) self-directed learning; and (6) planning and using peer tutoring. Each chapter presents background information, basic concepts and principles, sample schedules, classroom layouts, instructional strategies, and further resources for multigrade teaching. Each chapter

Language: English

Published: Portland, Oregon: Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory, Sep 1989

Advanced Search