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508 results

Article

Recent Studies and Practices of the Montessori Educational Method: Ten Years from 1979 on the DIALOG Data-Base

Available from: Semantic Scholar

Publication: Annual Reports from the Faculty of Education, Iwate University, vol. 51, no. 2

Pages: 147-161

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: I review recent practices and studies of the Montessori method from 1979 and intend to discover some tasks for future studies. I researched fourteen files in the DIALOG database, and tried to find papers from 1979 using the key word "MONTESSORI". Sixty-seven titles of books and papers were output from the DIALOG database. I classified them into five large groups. Each large group was further divided into small groups. The following are these large groups, with the numbers of books and papers contained in each large group shown in parenthses. 1. Studies which compared the Montessori method with other methods. (27) 2. Practical examples which developed and applied the Montessori method. (18) 3. Studies about the Montessori method for handicapped children. (12) 4. Philosophical and theoretical studies about the Montessori method. (8) 5. Scientific studies about the Montessori method. (2) The group of "Scientific studies about the Montessori method" had only two papers, the smallest in number of the five groups. The Montessori method was created scientifically by Maria Montessori at the beginning of this century. During the following years the educational and psychological sciences have developed gradually. I think that the Montessori method should be further studied scientifically from the modern educational and psychological points of view. Scientific studies will clarify new aspects of the Montessori method and add new elements to it. The Montessori method will develop and be applied to various fields.

Language: English

Article

Disarmament in Education

Publication: The Montessori Magazine: A Quarterly Journal for Teachers, Parents and Social Workers (India), vol. 4, no. 3

Pages: 9-12

Maria Montessori - Writings, Peace education

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Abstract/Notes: This is the only type of examination that Maria Montessori regarded as unavoidable: In the reform of the Italian schools we have abolished annual examinations. There is only one examination at the end of a course of studies. This, too, is a partial disarmament. Maria Montessori, “Disarmament in Education,” [Maria Montessori refers to this abolition of examinations as a “partial disarmament” implying that they are part of a war against children!]

Language: English

Article

The Religious Education of Small Children

Publication: The New Review

Pages: 105-115

Maria Montessori - Writings, Montessori method of education, Religious education

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Language: English

Article

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Montessori and Jerome W. Berryman: Work, play, religious education, and the art of using the Christian language system

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: British Journal of Religious Education, vol. 33, no. 3

Pages: 341-353

Religious education

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Language: English

DOI: 10.1080/01416200.2011.595925

ISSN: 0141-6200, 1740-7931

Article

Cosmic Education

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 25, no. 3

Pages: 53-77

Cosmic education, Margaret Elizabeth Stephenson - Writings

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Abstract/Notes: Discusses Maria Montessori's view of the elementary child's educational needs. Maintains that older children need opportunities to use their reasoning abilities to come to a state of peace, stability, and security at the second plane of development. Discusses the teacher's role in cosmic education to incite curiosity and to teach responsibility. (KB)

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

Reflections on the Internationality of Montessori Education

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 20, no. 3

Pages: 40-44

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: One of the major components of Dr. Montessori's plan for peace education is a curriculum that de-emphasizes nationalism. The "big picture" of the cultural curriculum encourages the perspective that people are citizens of Earth first, and only secondarily American, Japanese, Polish, or other nationalities. Through the fundamental needs material, children learn that all people on all continents throughout history had and have the same basic needs. In preindustrial times, geographic context, together with local natural resources, determined how different groups of people met their needs. And because this is still true, the Montessori geography curriculum is not limited to land and water forms and political borders, but necessarily extends to the people who inhabit other places. It teaches that other people are much like everyone else in terms of basic needs, but that they may meet those needs in very different ways; and children learn to respect those differences. Such a perspective is developed in Montessori settings even where little ethnic, religious, or social diversity exists, as long as a quality program is in place. Additionally, planetwide problems that Montessori may not have specifically anticipated, such as global warming, necessitate new attitudes and curricula that form and emphasize an "ecopsychological" awareness. This article examines the relevance of Montessori education to international schools: When properly integrated, Montessori complements and enhances many aspects of an international school, but when misapplied or partially applied, the obstacles that result can be quite difficult to overcome.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Book

Montessoris pedagogiska imperium: Kulturkritik och politik i mellankrigstidens Montessorirörelse [Montessori's educational empire: Cultural criticism and politics in the Montessori movement of the interwar period]

Maria Montessori - Biographic sources, Montessori method of education - History

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Abstract/Notes: Under 1900-talets första decennier vann den italienska läkaren Maria Montessori berömmelse som pedagogisk förnyare. Den frihetliga andan och mönstergilla disciplinen i hennes förskolor och skolor slog omvärlden med häpnad. Men Montessori skulle inte bara lansera en ny pedagogik. Under mellankrigstiden, när hennes metod fick stort genomslag internationellt, påtog hon sig rollen som kulturkritisk rörelseledare. Med paroller om barnets frigörelse och samhällets rekonstruktion värvade rörelsen många entusiastiska anhängare. I dåtida press talades det om montessorism i liknande ordalag som man talade om feminism, freudianism och marxism. Förväntningarna på vad montessorismen skulle kunna åstadkomma också utanför skolportarna var höga. I Montessoris pedagogiska imperium belyser Christine Quarfood, utifrån ett omfattande historiskt källmaterial, Montessorirörelsen som kulturkritisk och opinionsbildande strömning. Boken lyfter fram det mångfasetterade i rörelsens budskap, utöver den psykopedagogiska tematiken också den politiskt och socialt laddade problematik kring makt- och auktoritetsfrågor, krig och fred som adresseras i rörelsens skrifter. Huvudfokus ligger på mottagandet i de länder där rörelsen fick störst genomslag, USA vid tiden kring första världskriget, England under 1920-talet, samt Mussolinis Italien, där Montessorirörelsen fick fascistregimens stöd från 1926 till 1934. / During the first decades of the 20th century, the Italian physician Maria Montessori gained fame as an educational innovator. The liberal spirit and exemplary discipline of her preschools and schools amazed the outside world. But Montessori would not just launch a new pedagogy. During the interwar period, when her method had a major impact internationally, she took on the role of culturally critical movement leader. With slogans about the child's liberation and the reconstruction of society, the movement recruited many enthusiastic supporters. In the press of that time, Montessori was spoken of in similar terms as feminism, Freudianism, and Marxism. Expectations of what Montessori could achieve outside the school gates were high. In Montessori's educational empire, Christine Quarfood, based on extensive historical source material, highlights the Montessori movement as a culturally critical and opinion-forming current. The book highlights the multifaceted in the movement's message, in addition to the psychopedagogical theme also the politically and socially charged issues around power and authority issues, war and peace that are addressed in the movement's writings. The main focus is on reception in the countries where the movement had the greatest impact, the United States during the First World War, England in the 1920s, and Mussolini's Italy, where the Montessori movement received the support of the fascist regime from 1926 to 1934.

Language: Swedish

Published: Göteborg, Sweden: Daidalos, 2017

ISBN: 978-91-7173-512-6

Article

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A Gyógypedagógia két Meghatározó Máriája: Maria Montessori és Hári Mária [Two Determining Marias of the Special Education: Maria Montessori and Mária Hári]

Available from: University of Debrecen Publishing Platform

Publication: Különleges Bánásmód - Interdiszciplináris folyóirat, vol. 2, no. 4

Pages: 35-47

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Abstract/Notes: This study presents the decisive pedagogy of two Marias: Dr. Montessori and Dr. Hári. Dr. Montessori was the first woman in Italy who received a medical degree and it was many years later when she did pedagogical studies as well. Dr. Hári was a young medical student when she started to work with Professor Pető who had laid down the basics of Conductive Education. Dr. Montessori and Dr. Hári had a lot in common: not just their profession was the same but thanks to their hard work both pedagogy became famous internationally. Through their personality, the reader will have a glance into their educational methods as well. The topic is relevant because both educational systems make it possible for people with disabilities to integrate into society and live meaningful lives. [ This study presents the decisive pedagogy of two Marias: Dr. Montessori and Dr. Hári. Dr. Montessori was the first woman in Italy who received a medical degree and it was many years later when she did pedagogical studies as well. Dr. Hári was a young medical student when she started to work with Professor Pető who had laid down the basics of Conductive Education. Dr. Montessori and Dr. Hári had a lot in common: not just their profession was the same but thanks to their hard work both pedagogy became famous internationally. Through their personality, the reader will have a glance into their educational methods as well. The topic is relevant because both educational systems make it possible for people with disabilities to integrate into society and live meaningful lives.]

Language: Hungarian

DOI: 10.18458/KB.2016.4.35

ISSN: 2498-5368

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

From the Particular to the General, the Continuous to the Discontinuous: Progressive Education Revisited

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: History of Education, vol. 30, no. 5

Pages: 413-432

Progressive education

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Language: English

DOI: 10.1080/00467600110064717

ISSN: 0046-760X, 1464-5130

Article

Developing Resilient Children: After 100 Years of Montessori Education

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 20, no. 2

Pages: 28-31

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: In this millennium, educators are faced with a number of issues that Dr. Maria Montessori could not have predicted. Today, students are different from the children Dr. Montessori observed in her "Casa dei Bambini." They are influenced by technology in all its forms. Some suffer from medical problems such as complex food allergies, which wreak havoc on their bodies and brains. Others have authentic learning differences that can be difficult to understand and deal with. Nonetheless, Dr. Montessori's directive that teachers respond to the "internal needs of a life in process of development" remains clear. Despite changing times, Montessori teachers remain steadfast in their approach to meet the "universal needs of the soul." Even with external pressure to conform to the demands of competitive communities, Montessori education continues to produce resilient children who persevere despite obstacles. Robert Brooks, a professor at Harvard Medical School and a leading authority on self-esteem and resilience, posits 10 guideposts that form the foundation of a resilient mindset. This article discusses these 10 guideposts which mesh with Montessori's fundamental principles of education.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

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