Quick Search
For faster results please use our Quick Search engine.

Advanced Search

Search across titles, abstracts, authors, and keywords.
Advanced Search Guide.

950 results

Article

The Effect of Montessori And Traditional Methods of Education on Emotional Intelligence of Children

Available from: Zenodo

Publication: European Journal of Education Studies, vol. 3, no. 4

Pages: 367-382

Asia, India, South Asia

See More

Abstract/Notes: The Montessori Method of education is becoming more popular in Indian cities in the recent decades. The parents, educationists and policy makers are keenly interested in the overall development of their children or stakeholders. Since its inception, the Montessori Method of education is adopting several procedures based on its basic principles of cognitive, social and emotional development of the children. Although every principle of Montessori education is not followed in the Indian Montessori schools, the schools are adhering to several of them. The present article adopted comparative analyses to determine the effect of Montessori and traditional method of education on emotional intelligence of the school children. A total sample of 1082 children between the age group of 12 – 16 years was selected from the schools of Montessori and traditional education. The data were collected using the Bar-on, (1997, 2000) Emotional Intelligence scale with Likert response patterns ranging 1 to 5. The obtained data was subjected to ‘t’ test analysis and it was evident in the result findings that the children of Montessori method of education has significantly higher emotional intelligence than the children of traditional method on the total and as well on all dimensions of emotional intelligence. This highlights the education intervention method having strong bearing on emotional development of the children. Further, the findings related to gender effect provides inconclusive results both with Montessori and traditional children.

Language: English

DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.399050

ISSN: 2501-1111

Article

Mrs. Ernest Thomson-Seton at Opening of Montessori School for New York Tenement Children

Available from: ProQuest Historical Newspapers

Publication: The Evening Record (Windsor, Ontario, Canada)

Pages: 8

See More

Abstract/Notes: "To prove that the Montessori system of education is both practical and available for the poor children of the tenements as well as for those who have every advantage that can be had for money, is the purpose of the Montessori Educational Association, which has just established a school for poor children in the upper East Side in one of the most thronged of the tenement sections of New York. The Montessori idea of education is diametrically opposed to the system in vogue. All the time commonly spent in training children to be passive is in the Montessori schools spent in awakening activity and encouraging initiative. Dr. Montessori, the founder of the new system of education, says that one of the most important tasks of the teacher lies in 'seeing that the child does not confound the idea of good with immobility, and evil with activity.' Instead of devoting months of arduous labor drilling the alphabet and elements of reading and writing into the heads of the little children, Montessori methods develop the various senses which give them control of the apparatur through which they must get all their knowledge of the world. One of the most remarkable things notied by the observers of the new school was the spontaneity with which the children learned to write. From tracing sand-paper letters and building of words by the aid of blocks, many of the children took up bits of chalk and began to write, not a few, but many words. The children learn to observe, to reason and to use their senses rather than clog their memoriy with useless rules. The school furnishes the little tots with luncheon, but even in this they are stimulated to activity. They have little waitresses who learn to move about freely and gracefully, to carry things without breaking them, and to avoid clumsiness and awkwardness. When the meal is over the children will all go into their small kitchen, roll up their sleeves and wash the dishes from which they had been eating. The picture shows Mrs. Ernest Thompson-Seton, the wife of Ernest Thompson-Seton, the Canadian author and naturalist, who is one of the trustees of the Montessori Educational Association, telling a little waitress to pose for the picture."

Language: English

Article

Spaces for Children: Listing to Young Children about Their Early Childhood Environments

Publication: Montessori International, vol. 84

Pages: 16–17

⛔ No DOI found

See More

Language: English

ISSN: 1470-8647

Article

Interaction of Children with and without Communication Disorders Using Montessori Activities for the Tablet

Available from: SpringerLink

Publication: Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, vol. 25

Pages: 495-507

Children with disabilities, Communicative disorders in children, Inclusive education, Montessori method of education, Montessori method of education, People with disabilities

See More

Abstract/Notes: Mobile technologies used for education may offer advantages for children with Communication Disorders, among which we can find language disorders and speech disorders, which are identified in DSM-V. In this research, we have introduced two educational activities, “Matching Cards” and “Cards & Sounds”, based on the Montessori Method and which deal with the first stages of reading and writing. We have tested these two activities with children with and without Communication Disorders in order to study how they interact. These groups of children use a Tablet to perform the two activities, which vary in visual and auditory stimuli. The activities employ two touch interactions: tap and drag & drop. Based on Montessori, the activity and the interaction do not produce either positive or negative feedback. The analysis performed with the variables of time, interaction and mistake has shown that children from both groups change their efficiency of use. Differences regarding the interaction of children with and without Communication Disorders have also been observed. Additionally, children with Communication Disorders need additional strategies as explicit indicators in the interaction which may be a guide to be able to carry out specific actions.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1007/s00779-020-01471-7

ISSN: 1617-4909, 1617-4917

Book Section

Written Language: The Old Methods of Teaching Reading and Writing; My First Experiments with Defective Children; First Experiments with Normal Children

Book Title: The Discovery of the Child

Pages: 199-216

Maria Montessori - Writings

See More

Abstract/Notes: Formerly entitled The Montessori Method: Scientific Pedagogy as Applied to Child Education in the Children's Houses. This book was first published in 1909 under the title 'Il Metodo della Pedagogia Scientifica Applicato all'Educazione Infantile nelle Case dei Bambini' ('The Montessori Method: Scientific Pedagogy as Applied to Child Education in the Children's Houses) and was revised in 1913, 1926, and 1935. Maria Montessori revised and reissued this book in 1948 and renamed it 'La Scoperta del Bambino'. This edition is based on the 6th Italian edition of 'La Scoperta del Bambino' published by the Italian publisher Garzanti, Milan, Italy in 1962. M. J. Costelloe, S. J. translated this Italian version into the English language in 1967 for Fides Publishers, Inc. In 2016 Fred Kelpin edited this version and added many footnotes. He incorporated new illustrations based on AMI-blueprints of the materials currently in use.

Language: English

Published: Amsterdam, The Netherlands: Montessori-Pierson Publishing Company, 2017

ISBN: 978-90-79506-38-5

Series: The Montessori Series , 2

Book Section

Montessori with the Culturally Disadvantaged: A Cognitive-Developmental Interpretation and Some Research Findings

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Book Title: Early Formal Education: Current Theory, Research, and Practice

Pages: 105-118

African American community, African Americans, Americas, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., North America, United States of America

See More

Abstract/Notes: This chapter describes a small research project evaluating the effects of a Montessori pre-school program upon the cognitive development of a group of Negro children from families in the Aid to Dependent Children category. The program has involved bringing a group of these children into classrooms for middle-class children in a parent-organized Montessori school in Hyde Park. Glen Nimnicht reports that the New Nursery School project at Colorado State College has also found some decreases in IQ in permissive non-integrated classroom programs for culturally disadvantaged children. During the summer, three Head Start classrooms were held in the Ancona Montessori School in the context of a general summer school program. Two of the classrooms were integrated: they were composed of half Head Start children, half middle-class children. The children of average IQ on first testing increased as much as did the children of low IQ on first testing.

Language: English

Published: New York: Routledge, 2017

Edition: 1st

ISBN: 978-1-351-31268-4 978-1-138-52252-7

Article

Societal Values and Policies May Curtail Preschool Children’s Physical Activity in Child Care Centers

Available from: American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP)

Publication: Pediatrics, vol. 129, no. 2

Pages: 265-274

See More

Abstract/Notes: BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Three-fourths of US preschool-age children are in child care centers. Children are primarily sedentary in these settings, and are not meeting recommended levels of physical activity. Our objective was to identify potential barriers to children’s physical activity in child care centers. METHODS: Nine focus groups with 49 child care providers (55% African American) were assembled from 34 centers (inner-city, suburban, Head Start, and Montessori) in Cincinnati, Ohio. Three coders independently analyzed verbatim transcripts for themes. Data analysis and interpretation of findings were verified through triangulation of methods. RESULTS: We identified 3 main barriers to children’s physical activity in child care: (1) injury concerns, (2) financial, and (3) a focus on “academics.” Stricter licensing codes intended to reduce children's injuries on playgrounds rendered playgrounds less physically challenging and interesting. In addition, some parents concerned about potential injury, requested staff to restrict playground participation for their children. Small operating margins of most child care centers limited their ability to install abundant playground equipment. Child care providers felt pressure from state mandates and parents to focus on academics at the expense of gross motor play. Because children spend long hours in care and many lack a safe place to play near their home, these barriers may limit children's only opportunity to engage in physical activity. CONCLUSIONS: Societal priorities for young children—safety and school readiness—may be hindering children’s physical development. In designing environments that optimally promote children’s health and development, child advocates should think holistically about potential unintended consequences of policies.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1542/peds.2011-2102

ISSN: 0031-4005, 1098-4275

Book

An American Montessori Elementary Teacher: Indigenous American Montessori Models

Available from: ERIC

Americas, Indigenous communities, Indigenous peoples, Nancy McCormick Rambusch - Writings, North America, United States of America

See More

Abstract/Notes: Maria Montessori's child-centered teaching method came to the United States in 1913 and became linked with an approach to progressive education and child rearing which many Americans considered permissive. During the post-World War II years, advocates of Montessori's method combined this permissive mode with elements of an authoritarian mode to produce an authoritative approach to teaching young children. Following this approach, educators at the Princeton Montessori School have developed and implemented a firm yet empathic teaching model for their classes. The social system which the teachers have developed in their classes respects children's intrinsic motivation in the form of a benign token economy, called a credit-debit system. In this system the rules of the classroom, and the rewards and sanctions attending the rules, are developed cooperatively between teacher and children. Teachers consider the small group as the basic unit of social organization for the presentation of lessons. Teachers present curricular subject areas in a sequence of steps which are numbered and which correspond to a set of materials preassembled by the teacher and directly accessible to the children. For each subject, students keep personal interactive journals which contain written and illustrated work for the whole year. Through these methods, teachers at the Princeton Montessori School demonstrate that they have understood the basic message of Montessori and imbedded that message in a culturally sensitive and appropriate form of schooling.

Language: English

Published: New Jersey: Princeton Center for Teacher Education, 1992

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

Cooperative Activities to Reduce Aggression in Young Children

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

See More

Abstract/Notes: I investigated the effect of introducing cooperative games during recess to reduce aggressive behaviors in preschool-age children. The action research was done at an intentionally culturally and socio-economically diverse Montessori school in St. Paul, Minnesota. The 23 children involved were all children from the three to six age group who take daily naps. I recorded every aggressive incident I saw before, during, and after the intervention. I also recorded what cooperative activities I introduced for the intervention. Once before and after the intervention I asked the children if they enjoyed recess. I recorded observational notes such as weather conditions, and what activities the children chose each day. The data did not show that the cooperative games had a significant effect on the number of aggressive incidents recorded. Many more boys than girls were involved in aggressive incidents. There was no significant change in how the children reported their enjoyment of recess. Aggressive behavior could possibly be reduced through another action research project with a longer intervention period, a conflict resolution plan, and more purposeful activities for the children outside.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2016

Report

Preschool Education for Inner-City Children: Preliminary Results of an Experimental Montessori Programme

Available from: ERIC

See More

Abstract/Notes: Early results from a Montessori nursery program initiated by Toronto, Canada, in 1971, to help inner-city children prepare for formal education indicate that the mothers of the 15 three- and four-year-old children were pleased with the program. Specifically, they felt that the children had increased their verbal skills, preparedness for junior kindergarten, and social maturity. However, not all mothers were pleased with the increased independence shown by some of the children. A study of the children's characteristics suggested that caution should be exerted in extrapolating the findings from other so-called disadvantaged children to inner-city children in one's own city. Other data are useful but the needs of a particular population must be carefully observed. When isolating deficiencies or identity needs, wholesale generalizations from superficial measures should not be made. Precise and explicit definitions should be made for such terms as deficient in language, intellectual motivation, or conceptual ability. Otherwise inadequate solutions are likely to result. (JS)

Language: English

Published: Toronto, Ontario, Canada, Nov 1971

Advanced Search