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93 results

Article

Montessori Public School Pre-K Programs and the School Readiness of Low-Income Black and Latino Children

Available from: APA PsycNet

Publication: Journal of Educational Psychology, vol. 106, no. 4

Pages: 1066-1079

African American community, African Americans, Americas, Latin American community, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, North America, Public Montessori, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Within the United States, there are a variety of early education models and curricula aimed at promoting young children's pre-academic, social, and behavioral skills. This study, using data from the Miami School Readiness Project (Winsler et al., 2008, 2012), examined the school readiness gains of low-income Latino (n = 7,045) and Black (n = 6,700) children enrolled in 2 different types of Title-1 public school pre-K programs: those in programs using the Montessori curriculum and those in more conventional programs using the High/Scope curriculum with a literacy supplement. Parents and teachers reported on children's socio-emotional and behavioral skills with the Devereux Early Childhood Assessment (Lebuffe & Naglieri, 1999), whereas children's pre-academic skills (cognitive, motor, and language) were assessed directly with the Learning Accomplishment Profile-Diagnostic (Nehring, Nehring, Bruni, & Randolph, 1992) at the beginning and end of their 4-year-old pre-K year. All children, regardless of curriculum, demonstrated gains across pre-academic, socio-emotional, and behavioral skills throughout the pre-K year; however, all children did not benefit equally from Montessori programs. Latino children in Montessori programs began the year at most risk in pre-academic and behavioral skills, yet exhibited the greatest gains across these domains and ended the year scoring above national averages. Conversely, Black children exhibited healthy gains in Montessori, but they demonstrated slightly greater gains when attending more conventional pre-K programs. Findings have implications for tailoring early childhood education programs for Latino and Black children from low-income communities.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1037/a0036799

ISSN: 1939-2176, 0022-0663

Article

Youngest Daughter Learns by Famed Montessori Method

Available from: Google Books

Publication: Jet, vol. 36, no. 1

Pages: 48

African American community, African Americans, Americas, Martin Luther King, Jr. family, Montessori method of education, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Includes details regarding the Martin Luther King, Jr. family embracing Montessori education for their youngest daughter, Bernice King.

Language: English

ISSN: 0021-5996, 2832-6008

Blog Post

Diversity in Public Montessori: It’s Complicated

African American community, African Americans, Americas, Mira C. Debs - Biographic sources, Mira C. Debs - Writings, Montessori schools, North America, Public Montessori, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Mira C. Debs, Yale Sociology of Education Ph.D. candidate and founder of Montessori for Social Justice, presented a chapter of her dissertation at the recent 2016 Montessori for Social Justice Conference: Writing the History of Public Montessori. The takeaway? It’s a little more complicated than you might think.

Language: English

Published: Jul 1, 2016

Book

Montessori for the Disadvantaged: An Application of Montessori Educational Principles to the War on Poverty

African American community, African Americans, Americas, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, North America, United States of America

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Language: English

Published: New York: Capricorn Books, 1968

Doctoral Dissertation

Diverse Parents, Desirable Schools: Public Montessori, Fit and Conflict in the Era of School Choice

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

African American community, African Americans, Americas, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Montessori schools, North America, Public Montessori, School choice, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: One of the fundamental social problems in America is how to create racially diverse schools. While policy makers are slow to fix underlying housing segregation or return to busing, creating racial diversity through school choice is widely popular across the political spectrum. How can school choice create more racial and socioeconomic diversity, instead of increasing segregation?

Language: English

Published: New Haven, Connecticut, 2016

Article

Montessori School Attempts to Free Children of Racism

Available from: UC Irvine Libraries

Publication: New University (Irvine, California), vol. 1, no. 18

Pages: 2

African American community, African Americans, Americas, Malcolm X Montessori School (Compton), Montessori schools, North America, United States of America

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Language: English

Article

TV Teacher to Philly Tots; Pert Jean Alexander Shows City Pre-School Children are Whizzes

Available from: Google Books

Publication: Ebony, vol. 19, no. 12

Pages: 147-150

African American community, African Americans, Americas, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., North America, Preschool children, United States of America, ⛔ No DOI found

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Language: English

ISSN: 0012-9011

Article

Hidden Black Voices in the History of Montessori Education

Available from: Academia

Publication: American Educational History Journal, vol. 47, no. 2

Pages: 205-221

African American community, African Americans, Americas, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, North America, United States of America, ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Maria Montessori was one of Italy's first female physicians, and she developed a groundbreaking educational method based on astute observation of children's behavior while working in one of the poorest neighborhoods in Rome (Gutek 2004; Kramer 1988). As someone who witnessed the extent of injustice experienced by poor women and children particularly, she turned from medicine to focus on education, seeing its potential power for social reform (Gutek 2004). Others have been drawn to the Montessori philosophy, sharing her belief that all children have the potential to become self-motivated, independent, and lifelong learners given an appropriate environment in which to flourish. Marginalized communities in the United States find this inclusivity to be a compelling message, leading to a growing number of public Montessori schools serving disadvantaged children (Debs 2019). The work and influence of Black Montessori educators is less wellknown than the stories of their white counterparts, so we profile three Black pioneers in the field. Before elaborating on the stories of Mae Arlene Gadpaille, Roslyn Williams, and Lenore Gertrude Briggs, Black Montessori pioneers who shared Maria Montessori's belief in the power of education for social justice, we first provide background on the Montessori Method, Maria Montessori's early years, and the history of Montessori education in the United States.

Language: English

ISSN: 1535-0584

Article

"To Be Strict on Your Own”: Black and Latinx Parents Evaluate Discipline in Urban Choice Schools

Available from: SAGE Journals

Publication: American Educational Research Journal, vol. 56, no. 5

Pages: 1896-1929

African American community, African Americans, Latin American community, Public Montessori, Montessori schools, Public Montessori, School choice

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Abstract/Notes: The proliferation of urban “no-excuses” charter schools has been justified by arguing that Black and Latinx parents want strict discipline. In this article, we examine what discipline means to Black and Latinx families at two popular choice options: a no-excuses charter and two public Montessori magnets. We found that parents viewed discipline as more than rule-following, valuing also self-discipline and academic discipline. While no-excuses parents supported an orderly environment, many found the discipline restrictive. Parents in the Montessori schools, by contrast, praised student autonomy but questioned whether the freedom was preparing their students academically. Our findings reveal a gap between what Black and Latinx parents want and what choice schools and local school choice markets have on offer.

Language: English

DOI: 10.3102/0002831219831972

ISSN: 0002-8312, 1935-1011

Article

The Kansas City Experiment

Publication: AMI/USA News, vol. 22, no. 1

Pages: 1, 8–9

African American community, African Americans, Americas, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, North America, United States of America

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Language: English

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