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622 results

Article

Mother, Melancholia, and Humor in Erik H. Erikson’s Earliest Writings

Available from: Springer Link

Publication: Journal of Religion and Health, vol. 47, no. 3

Pages: 415-432

Erik H. Erikson - Biographic sources

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Abstract/Notes: Erik H. Erikson wrote three articles when he was in his late-twenties and an up-and-coming member of the psychoanalytic community in Vienna. At the time he wrote these articles, he was in a training psychoanalysis with Anna Freud, teaching at the Heitzing School in Vienna, and learning the Montessori method of teaching. These articles focus on the loss of primary narcissism and the development of the superego (or punitive conscience) in early childhood, especially through the child’s conflict with maternal authority. They support the idea that melancholia, with its internalized rage against the mother, is the inevitable outcome of the loss of primary narcissism. I note, however, that the third of these articles makes a case for the restorative role of humor, especially when Freud’s view that humor is a function of the superego is taken into account.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1007/s10943-008-9178-x

ISSN: 1573-6571

Article

Maria Montessori: A Life in Pictures and Writings

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 32, no. 2

Pages: 34-39

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: When this vision is opened up he will be fascinated to such an extent that he will value the cosmic laws and their correlation more than any simple fact. [...]the child will develop a kind of philosophy, which teaches him the unity of the universe. "If one day UNESCO resolved to involve children in the reconstruction of the world and building peace, if it chose to call on them, to discuss with them, and recognize the value of all the revelations they have for us, it would find them of immense help in infusing new life into this society which must be founded on the cooperation of all." In September 1898, she speaks at a national pedagogical conference, in Turin, Italy, and addresses the audience about a new way of teaching children who were previously thought to be unteachable. 1900-1902 In the year she turns 30, Montessori is appointed director of Rome's Orthophrenic School, a model school for training teachers of children with developmental disabilities. 1910 Two parallel teacher training courses are held in the Franciscan convent on Via Giusti in Rome, where there is a model Children's House.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Bibliography on Montessori Adolescent Education: Published (primary) Writings by Maria Montessori

Publication: Communications: Journal of the Association Montessori Internationale (2009-2012), vol. 2011, no. 1-2

Pages: 193–195

Bibliographies, ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: listing of writing ranging from 1920-1942

Language: English

ISSN: 1877-539X

Article

Primary Children [Writings by children in 9-12 class]

Publication: Montessori Matters

Pages: 6–7

⛔ No DOI found

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Language: English

Article

Pretend Play and Fantasy: What if Montessori was Right?

Available from: Society for Research in Child Development

Publication: Child Development Perspectives, vol. 13, no. 2

Pages: 85-90

Angeline Stoll Lillard - Writings, Fantasy in children, Maria Montessori - Philosophy, Play

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Abstract/Notes: Pretend play and fantasy are staples of childhood, supported by adults’ provision of encouraging tools (like dress‐up clothing and play kitchens) and by media. Decades ago, Maria Montessori developed a system of education based on close observation of children, and she concluded that pretend play and fantasy were not as helpful for children's development as the zeitgeist suggested (and still suggests). In this article, we present her views and relevant evidence, and ask: What if she was right? What if, as a culture, we are putting great effort and faith into activities and contexts for children that we believe help development but that might actually be less helpful than engaging in the real world?

Language: English

DOI: 10.1111/cdep.12314

ISSN: 1750-8606

Article

Lockdown Learning Highlights How Schools Fail to Build on Children's Natural Ways of Learning

Available from: Association Montessori Internationale

Publication: AMI Journal (2013-), vol. 2020

Pages: 310-313

Angeline Stoll Lillard - Writings, COVID-19 Pandemic, ⛔ No DOI found

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Language: English

ISSN: 2215-1249, 2772-7319

Article

Learning from Apps and Objects: The Human Touch

Available from: Wiley Online Library

Publication: Mind, Brain, and Education, vol. 14, no. 1

Pages: 16-23

Angeline Stoll Lillard - Writings, Information and communications technology (ICT), Knowledge acquisition, Learning

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Abstract/Notes: In three studies, we examined children's geography learning from a physical puzzle and an app designed to mimic the puzzle. In Study 1, 5- and 6-year-olds were taught Australia's states by an experimenter using a puzzle or were taught by an app. Children learned significantly more states from instruction with the puzzle than when they used the app independently. When children were allowed to bring home the puzzle or app for 1 week in Study 2, total learning between conditions was comparable. Length and frequency of use were related to learning only for puzzle users. In Study 3, children were taught the geography lesson by an experimenter using the app. Children's learning from this social app condition was equal to the social puzzle condition but higher than the solo app condition of the earlier studies, suggesting that learning from digital devices is most successful when supplemented with in-person social interaction.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1111/mbe.12224

ISSN: 1751-228X

Article

Standardized Test Proficiency in Public Montessori Schools

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: Journal of School Choice, vol. 16, no. 1

Pages: 105-135

Academic achievement, Americas, Angeline Stoll Lillard - Writings, Montessori schools, Montessori schools, North America, Public Montessori, Standardized tests, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Although Montessori is the most common unconventional education model, no multi-state study has compared standardized test proficiency of Montessori schools with districts. Here we report on this for the 10 states/regions with the most public Montessori schools (n = 195). In 3rd grade, Montessori schools were less proficient in math but more proficient in ELA. In 8th grade they were also more proficient on ELA and showed a trend to greater proficiency in math. Black, Hispanic, and economically disadvantaged students at Montessori schools were more proficient on ELA tests, and performed better or similarly on math tests, at both grade levels. Achievement gaps were generally smaller. Difference in percent proficient in 8th grade controlling for 3rd grade was consistently greater at Montessori schools than in districts. Potential reasons for the different performance of Montessori schools are discussed.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1080/15582159.2021.1958058

ISSN: 1558-2159, 1558-2167

Article

The Current Landscape of US Children’s Television: Violent, Prosocial, Educational, and Fantastical Content

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: Journal of Children and Media, vol. 13, no. 3

Pages: 276-294

Angeline Stoll Lillard - Writings, Children's mass media, Children's television programs, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: The present study examined currently popular children’s television shows to determine the prevalence of violent, prosocial, educational, and fantastical content (including fantastical events and anthropomorphism). Network, style, and content ratings were collected for 88 shows using a combination of Common Sense Media and laboratory ratings applied to two randomly-selected episodes of each show. Overall, currently popular children’s television shows were most often animated and contained little violent, prosocial, or educational content, but a great deal of fantastical content. Interrelations among variables were also examined. Shows with fantastical events were both more violent and more prosocial than shows without, and shows with anthropomorphism were more prosocial than shows without. The network on which a show aired predicted violent, prosocial, and educational content, but not fantastical content. Children’s television today is not as violent as might be believed, but nor is it particularly prosocial or educational. It is highly fantastical. The implications of the landscape for children’s behavior, learning, and cognition are discussed.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1080/17482798.2019.1605916

ISSN: 1748-2798

Article

Authentic Montessori: The Dottoressa’s View at the End of Her Life Part II: The Teacher and the Child

Available from: University of Kansas Libraries

Publication: Journal of Montessori Research, vol. 5, no. 1

Pages: 19-34

Angeline Stoll Lillard - Writings, Maria Montessori - Biographic sources, Maria Montessori - Philosophy, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Montessori method of education - Teachers, Teacher-student relationships, Teachers

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Abstract/Notes: Part II of this two-part article continues the discussion of what Maria Montessori viewed to be the important components of her educational system. Because she developed the system over her lifetime, we prioritized later accounts when contradictory accounts were found. Whereas Part I focused on the environment, Part II examines the second and third components of the Montessori trinity: the teacher and the child. This article includes descriptions of Montessori teacher prepara­tion, children’s developmental stages, and the human tendencies on which Montessori education capitalizes. It ends with child outcomes as described by Dr. Montessori and as shown in recent research, and provides an appendix summarizing features of authentic Montessori described in Part I and Part II.

Language: English

DOI: 10.17161/jomr.v5i1.9753

ISSN: 2378-3923

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