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Archival Material Or Collection

Box 11, Folder 50 - Manuscript Fragments, n.d. - "The New Children - A Miracle in Education / "The New Children - or - New Method"

Available from: Seattle University

Edwin Mortimer Standing - Biographic sources, Edwin Mortimer Standing - Writings

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Language: English

Archive: Seattle University, Lemieux Library and McGoldrick Learning Commons, Special Collections

Book

Talent for the future: social and personality development of gifted children: Proceedings of the Ninth world conference on gifted and talented children

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Language: English

Published: Assen, The Netherlands: Van Gorcum & Co., 1992

ISBN: 90-232-2656-9

Article

English with Non-English Children in a Montessori House of Children [3]

Publication: Around the Child, vol. 6

Pages: 53-57

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Language: English

ISSN: 0571-1142

Article

To Save Displaced Children and Young Refugees: Montessori’s Early Initiatives for Children at Risk

Available from: Association Montessori Internationale

Publication: AMI Journal (2013-), vol. 2020

Pages: 18-25

Displaced communities, Refugees, White Cross (Croce Bianca)

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Language: English

ISSN: 2215-1249, 2772-7319

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

The 'Cosmic' Task of the Youngest Children – Direct, Anticipate or Respect? Experiences Working with Small Children

Available from: Stockholm University Press

Publication: Journal of Montessori Research and Education, vol. 2, no. 1

Pages: 1–12

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Abstract/Notes: The article derived from Grazia Honegger Fresco’s years in close cooperation with Maria Montessori and Adele Costa Gnocchi. The author illustrates how small children from the moment they start using their hands and are standing unassisted on their own legs must act in their own way. The teacher must observe before acting and intervene as little as possible. Honegger Fresco follows the work of Montessori and Costa Gnocchi and she compares the findings with different fields of science, such as ethnology and neurology. As a result of her observations and experiences she points toward the relationship between a good childhood, and in the long term, human responsibility on Earth, using the concept “the Cosmic Task”. The method in this article is based on autoethnography, as the author shares her personal experience and reflections, both as a teacher and as an educator. The aim is to shed light on aspects regarding the needs of small children and to point at the essential role of adults, educators as well as parents. As Schiedi explains, autoethnography “extends its narrative horizon to a social, professional, organizational dimension of the self” (2016). During Honegger Fresco’s career, she was primarily inspired by Maria Montessori’s research about child development and children’s needs and rights, and she had continuously deepened her understanding by studying other researchers in this field. Thus, the article will share her conviction that by serving the creative spirit of the youngest children we will build a better future for our planet.

Language: English

DOI: 10.16993/jmre.10

ISSN: 2002-3375

Article

English with Non-English Children in a Montessori House of Children [2]

Available from: Stadsarchief Amsterdam (Amsterdam City Archives)

Publication: Around the Child, vol. 4

Pages: 28-33

Children's House (Casa dei Bambini)

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Language: English

ISSN: 0571-1142

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Children’s Preference for Real Activities: Even Stronger in the Montessori Children’s House

Available from: University of Kansas Libraries

Publication: Journal of Montessori Research, vol. 4, no. 2

Pages: 1-9

Americas, Montessori method of education - Evaluation, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: In the United States, children are often given the opportunity to engage in pretend activities; many believe this kind of play benefits children’s development. Recent research has shown, though, that when children ages 4 to 6 are given a choice to do the pretend or the real version of 9 different activities, they would prefer the real one. The reasons children gave for preferring real activities often concerned their appreciation of the functionality; when children did prefer pretend activities, their reasons often cited being afraid of, not allowed to, or unable to do the real activity. Given that children in Montessori classrooms have more experience performing real, functional activities, in this study we asked if this preference for real activities is even stronger among children in Montessori schools. We also asked children to explain their preferences. The data are from 116 3- to 6-year-old children (M = 59.63 months, SD = 12.08 months; 68 female): 62 not in Montessori schools and 54 in Montessori schools. Children explained their preferences for pretendand real versions of 9 different activities. Children in Montessori schools preferred real activities even more than did children in other preschools, but all children explained their choices in similar ways. The implications of these results are discussed with regard to play in preschool classrooms.

Language: English

DOI: 10.17161/jomr.v4i2.7586

ISSN: 2378-3923

Article

Gardening with Children: Children Helping Nature

Publication: Tomorrow's Child, vol. 4, no. 3

Pages: 23

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Language: English

ISSN: 1071-6246

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Implementing Autonomy Support: Insights from a Montessori Classroom

Available from: Macro Think Institute

Publication: International Journal of Education, vol. 2, no. 2

Pages: 1-15

Americas, Maria Montessori - Philosophy, Montessori method of education - Evaluation, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Extant research studies have found that autonomy support has a positive impact on the perceived competence and intrinsic motivation of students. However, few studies have investigated how autonomy supportive classrooms can be implemented. Montessori education is established upon the philosophy of helping each child attain self-mastery and independence. It emphasizes that students be given autonomy to engage freely with their learning environment. This case study of an upper-elementary Montessori classroom found that the Montessori philosophy of education guided how teachers used autonomy supportive strategies. Teachers supported student organizational autonomy by allowing them choice in terms of school work and work partners. They fostered cognitive autonomy by encouraging student independent thinking, encouraging self-initiation, and honoring students’ voice. When implementing control, they acknowledged and respected student feelings, provided rationales for expected behavior, and suppressed criticism. Students surveyed rated themselves highly in terms of intrinsic motivation for schoolwork. Five guidelines are derived from this study to help teachers implement autonomy support in K-12 classrooms.

Language: English

DOI: 10.5296/ije.v2i2.511

ISSN: 1948-5476

Article

El trabajo de la autonomía de 3 a 6 años [The work of autonomy from 3 to 6 years]

Publication: Revista Aula de Infantil, vol. 73, no. 73

Pages: 19-24

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Abstract/Notes: En este artículo se explica cómo se trabaja la autonomía en las aulas de 3 a 6 años con ejemplos que las guías del centro Montessori-Palau han podido observar en el aula.

Language: Spanish

ISSN: 1577-5615, 2014-4628

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