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419 results

Article

Text for Botany Circle Material

Publication: Montessori Elementary Newsletter, vol. 2, no. 1

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Language: English

Book Section

A Perspective from a Students' Quality Circle

Book Title: Higher Education in a State of Crisis

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Abstract/Notes: Significant macro- and micro-environmental changes in recent decades have culminated in a series of current challenges for learning and teaching in the Higher Education sector. These changes include widening participation and meeting the needs of a diverse student community; the move to a ‘mass’ or ‘universal’ education approach to accommodate increasing student numbers since the 1960s; the increasing accountability of publicly-funded institutions; and political imperatives linking higher education to wider innovation and economic growth...

Language: English

Published: Hauppauge, New York: Nove Science Publishers, 2011

ISBN: 978-1-61209-686-5

Book

Full Circle: A New Look at Multiage Education

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Abstract/Notes: Noting that there is a great demand for information to help educators learn about and develop programs in multiage education, this book shares many ideas on multiage instruction. The 12 chapters of the book are: (1) "Circling Back" (Jane Doan), on the resurgence of interest in the multiage movement; (2) "One Day" (Penelle Chase), exploring a day in the multiage classroom; (3) "Our Views" (Jane Doan), a discussion on teachers' personal beliefs and thoughts on multiage education; (4) "Valuing" (Penelle Chase), on what students value and what teachers value about the students; (5) "The Little Room" (Jane Doan), on dramatic play in the multiage setting; (6) "The Pumpkin Project" (Penelle Chase), about an integrated learning project; (7) "Widening Circles" (Penelle Chase and others), writings that address many of the questions asked about multiage education; (8) "Multiage: A Parent's View," (Katy Alioto), a parent's perspective on the multiage environment; (9) "Safe and Successful:

Language: English

Published: Portsmouth, New Hampshire: Heinemann, 1994

ISBN: 0-435-08814-9

Article

The Water Molecule: How Montessori High School, International Baccalaureate, and University Circle Bond to Form a Sustainable Molecule

Available from: ERIC

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 42, no. 3

Pages: 49-79

North American Montessori Teachers' Association (NAMTA) - Periodicals

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Abstract/Notes: Using the water molecule as a metaphor, Marilyn Doerr presents a study of a Montessori high school that combines the elements of Montessori with International Baccalaureate (IB) and other institutions in the surrounding community that enrich the experience of the students. The pedagogy of the high school, she explains, must be based on an understanding of human development. As we see throughout this journal, when we think of human development at the high school level we must think of the adolescent developing their sense of social justice and personal dignity. Doerr explains some of the practices of the Montessori High School in Cleveland's University Circle, touches on brain development and the characteristics of adolescents, and finally explains how IB and local institutions enhance the development of the adolescent to achieve a sense of social identity and responsibility. A bibliography is included.

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

Curriculum Frameworks for Montessori High School at University Circle

Publication: NAMTA Journal, no. Supplement

Pages: 121–127

North American Montessori Teachers' Association (NAMTA) - Periodicals

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Abstract/Notes: IB courses

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Master's Thesis

Breaking the Circle of One: Reflection in Montessori Early Childhood Centres in Aotearoa New Zealand

Available from: Victoria University of Wellington - Research Archive

Australasia, Australia and New Zealand, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Montessori schools, New Zealand, Oceania

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Abstract/Notes: Little is currently known about how teachers in New Zealand Montessori early childhood centres reflect on Montessori philosophy and practice individually and collaboratively within teaching teams. The purpose of this research was to discover the current views about reflection on Montessori philosophy, the barriers teachers faced in reflecting and opportunities they identified for reflection. The impact that requirements for self review and teacher reflection have had on the approach taken to reflection, inquiry and professional learning by teachers in Montessori early childhood centres was also investigated. This research study used a mixed method case study and data was collected from teachers working in Montessori early childhood centres through semistructured interviews with three groups and an online survey of individual teachers. Participants placed high importance on reflection. However some participants were reluctant to critique Montessori philosophy; either because they viewed it as ‘valid’ or because they were concerned about being regarded as ‘heretical’ by other teachers. Participants felt safe raising questions within their teaching teams, but were more wary of debating and questioning philosophical issues with teachers in the wider Montessori community. Others regarded reflection as an opportunity to develop a shared understanding of Montessori philosophy and practice in their early childhood centre. Despite the participants’ perception that their team spent time reflecting on Montessori philosophy and relating this to daily teaching practice, it was still a challenge to make these reflective activities a priority in limited centre team meeting times. In addition, it appears that more support is needed to improve skills and knowledge about how the cyclical process of review or inquiry can engage with Montessori philosophy, inform centre philosophy, drive centre practice and improve outcomes for children. This study suggests that teachers would benefit from the creation of ‘safe spaces’ where they can engage with colleagues from their own or other Montessori early childhood centres in debate and discussion so that teaching practice becomes based on critical engagement with the underlying theoretical or philosophical principles of Montessori education.

Language: English

Published: Wellington, New Zealand, 2014

Book Section

Circles and Fractions

Book Title: Creative Development in the Child: The Montessori Approach

Pages: 294-298

Asia, Geometry, India, Maria Montessori - Speeches, addresses, etc., Maria Montessori - Writings, South Asia

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Abstract/Notes: Maria Montessori lectured in Italian during the first International Montessori Course in 1939 at Madras, India. These 75 lectures were translated into English by her son Mario, as she spoke. And were taken down near verbatim in short hand, transcribed and set into galleys overnight. One such set of proofs forms the original manuscript for this book. For the most part, each chapter in this book encompasses a single lecture. The lectures are left in the same order as they were given, swinging between psychology and the use of the materials. India’s diversity of language, social custom and religious practice enriched her research. During this time, Dr. Montessori worked with children in Madras and put into practice her theories of adapting the environment, furniture and the Practical Life materials to local conditions. In these lectures, Maria Montessori speaks with the mature wisdom of a lifetime spent studying, not just early childhood, but human development as a whole and gives a complete, wonderful and colorful overview of her pedagogy and philosophy.

Language: English

Published: Amsterdam, The Netherlands: Montessori-Pierson Publishing Company, 2020

ISBN: 978-90-79506-52-1

Series: The Montessori Series , 24

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

Witnessing the Unlimited Potential of Children Being Peaceful: Impact of Proactive Restorative Circle Practice on Early Childhood Students in a Montessori Setting

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

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Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this action research was to study the effects that daily proactive restorative circle practice (PRCP) had on speaking skills, listening, and positive classroom culture amongst Montessori Children's House students. The research took place over a four week period of time in a two way immersion Children's House in a Montessori public charter school in the Midwest. The population included 8 students ages 4-5.5 years. Students participated in a daily proactive restorative circle each afternoon. The researcher also observed students during lunch to collect data on any influence the PRCP had outside of circle time. Data was collected through field notes, tallies, and a sense of community scale. The intervention suggested an increase in speaking skills and maintaining positive classroom culture. Students also demonstrated an increased sense of responsibility and accountability to the implementation of PRCP. Continued research is needed to determine the effectiveness of PRCP with more participants as well as how the effects of the PRCP transfer over to the general classroom experience.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2020

Book Section

The Circle

Book Title: Psychogeometry

Pages: 127-180

Maria Montessori - Writings

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Abstract/Notes: Includes the following section(s): The Material, Angles in Shapes, Decorative Drawings, Fractions, Fractions of Fractions, Control of Error, Decimal Numbers

Language: English

Published: Amsterdam, The Netherlands: Montessori-Pierson Publishing Company, 2011

Series: The Montessori Series , 16

Master's Thesis (Design)

Full Circle Futures: Educating the Next Generation on Circular Design Practice

Available from: OhioLINK ETD Center

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Abstract/Notes: Environmental concerns continue to increase daily, leaving many wondering what they might do to minimize their impact on the planet. As a result, it is critical to educate the general public, particularly secondary school students, about embracing more sustainable practices. As these students will become our society's future designers and consumers, it is crucial to equip them with the necessary tools and knowledge to foster a more responsible future for our environment and climate. This starts with smart, responsible design. As the Ellen MacArthur Foundation says, “Waste and pollution does not exist by accident, it is the result of design decisions” (2021). To adequately equip our future decision-makers, it is crucial to educate them on the importance of Circular Design (CD), a way of designing products that fit into the Circular Economy (CE). The CE is an environmentally sustainable “system of closed loops, where nothing becomes waste, and everything has value” (Foundation, 2021). However, CD is rarely integrated into the curricula of public schools, with sustainable education predominantly offered within Montessori environments or at the university level. This usually means that public school students are left out of this important equation. There is little evidence to support that CD is currently widely taught in many schooling environments. This research study aims to understand how we might best educate Gen Z public school students on the foundations of CD. Additionally, it seeks to determine whether an elevated level of content regarding CD can influence these students to become more conscientious about their role in the world and how they can apply these practices to their daily lives. Through three phases of applied research methods, this study explores how we might dress this gap. The first phase relies on a literature review to create CD learning tools for students and teachers, which were then refined with Montessori educators in phase two through phenomenological research. Finally, in phase three, these tools were tested with public school students through action research in a hands-on learning workshop. Phase three was crucial, as it reflects the public student voice and led to the identification of how these tools and the general foundations of CD were perceived. Students were required to complete a post-workshop survey, which was analyzed and evaluated to understand how much CD content these students retained. The ultimate goal of this research was to create a short-form CD curriculum for Gen Z secondary school students, heightening their awareness of the importance of living and consuming more responsibly as they transition into independent decision-making roles and, in some cases, future designers. It is hoped that this research contributes to the ongoing discourse on CD education and its impact on sustainable design’s future. The young people of today hold a significant influence on tomorrow. As an academic community, we must engage in conversations about this topic and recognize Gen Z's pivotal role in shaping a sustainable, circular future. The future is circular. The future is now.

Language: English

Published: Cincinnati, Ohio, 2023

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