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Master's Thesis

Respectful Relationships: How Does the Montessori Environment Foster Relationships with Respect?

Available from: Auckland University of Technology Library

Australasia, Australia and New Zealand, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., New Zealand, Oceania

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Abstract/Notes: This study investigates the phenomenon of respect through examination of the literature and observation of lived experience in two Montessori environments in Aotearoa, New Zealand. Utilising a case study approach, the thesis seeks to reveal the nature of respectful relationships and how these are fostered in two Montessori early childhood centres. A qualitative approach is used to study the social setting in order to understand the meaning of participants’ lives in their own terms. This design makes explicit the ways people come to understand and manage day-to-day situations. A phenomenological method was employed to look beyond the details of everyday life in order to draw upon the lived experiences of the participants. The technique of bracketing observations required the researcher to suspend assumptions and common-sense explanations concerning the experience. This assisted the researcher to encounter the observations independently and reduced bias. The findings reveal four aspects that work in conjunction with the child’s natural development to foster respect: A prepared environment and the child’s freedom within that environment serve to demonstrate how the respectful relationship can be supported and fostered in individuals. In addition, the development of a mutual relationship based on recognition of the child's capabilities; and freedom of movement within the environment work in conjunction to foster respect for self, others and the environment. Information for the case studies was recorded by video camera. Relationship building prior to data collection alleviated fears associated with the video recording and provided more insight into participants’ lived experiences. In conjunction, video data provided a record of moments in time for review and reflection. Future research may seek to provide comparison of the outcomes of practice in differing situations but a key point in this research was an emphasis on non-judgmental acceptance of each Montessori environment. The research sheds light on situations in which teachers, other adults and children develop respectful practice(s). The study indicates how Montessori philosophy and nature intertwines to achieve reciprocal and respectful relationships between all involved in this approach to education and life.

Language: English

Published: Auckland, New Zealand, 2013

Article

The Prepared Environment

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 22, no. 2

Pages: 107-110

Classroom environment, Maria Montessori - Philosophy, Montessori method of education, Prepared environment, Teacher-student relationships, ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Asserts that adults are not only responsible for preparing the Montessori environment, but more importantly constitute a living environment in and of themselves. Urges Montessori teachers to be an effective link between the child and the environment by manifesting a genuine interest in each developing child and creating a psychological atmosphere of enthusiasm, discovery, and love. (EV)

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Book

The Multigrade Classroom: A Resource Handbook for Small, Rural Schools

Available from: ERIC

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Abstract/Notes: This handbook was written to review current research on multigrade instruction, to identify key issues faced by multigrade classroom teachers, and to offer novice teachers a set of resource guides for improving instructional quality. The first chapter reviews previous research on multigrade instruction. It addresses questions regarding the effect of multigrade instruction on student performance and the training needed to teach in a multigrade classroom. The other chapters of the handbook cover topic areas considered essential for effective multigrade instruction: (1) classroom organization; (2) classroom management and discipline; (3) instructional organization and curriculum; (4) instrucational delivery and grouping; (5) self-directed learning; and (6) planning and using peer tutoring. Each chapter presents background information, basic concepts and principles, sample schedules, classroom layouts, instructional strategies, and further resources for multigrade teaching. Each chapter

Language: English

Published: Portland, Oregon: Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory, Sep 1989

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

The Effects of the Implementation of the Conscious Discipline Program on Social Emotional Learning in an Early Childhood Classroom

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

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Abstract/Notes: This study investigates the efficacy of Conscious Discipline’s teaching strategies to enrich social-emotional learning and establish a positive classroom climate in an early childhood Montessori classroom. Conscious Discipline is a written program, of instructional and behavioral strategies created by Dr. Becky Bailey (2011). The question throughout this research project was “Does teaching Conscious Discipline strategies enhance social-emotional learning in preschool aged children?” The study was conducted in a Montessori classroom, the participants being both boys and girls ranging in age from 3 to 4 years. For six weeks, Conscious Discipline strategies were being implemented on a day-to-day basis, when dealing with real-life incidents in the classroom, reading books purchased through Conscious Discipline and establishing a Safe Place. During this sixweek study data was gathered through observations, a pre-survey, and a standardized assessment, and analyzed to document the effects of Conscious Discipline. The data collected demonstrated an increase in social-emotional learning, an increase in the joy in teaching, a positive classroom climate, a decrease in aggressive acts, and an increase in student respect and responsibility in a social community.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2014

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

The Effects of Relationship-Driven Classroom Management

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research, Lower elementary, Montessori method of education

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Abstract/Notes: This study was initiated to determine the effects of relationship-driven classroom management on positive behaviors in the lower elementary classroom. The research was conducted in a rural public Montessori school. Students were carefully observed to determine behavioral norms. Next, they were invited to participate in a survey to establish their current perception of positive relationships within their school and particularly with myself as a guide. Subsequently, I conducted a family survey, recorded daily observation of positive behaviors, and collected samples of student work during the research period. Finally, I re-administered the students survey to determine if they believed their relationships had improved. Although the test period was short, there was a noticeable improvement in positive behavior in the classroom. I observed a reduction in off task behaviors, an increase in independent work, and an improvement in both the quantity and quality of follow-up work students produced. I anticipate the ongoing practice of relationship-driven classroom management strategies will continue to reduce misbehavior and create a more peaceful classroom. In the future, I will focus on preventative rather that reactive management. I will also be conscious to notice the positive. It is clear that a peaceful and positive environment increases productivity, learning, and feelings of success. This research empowered me to always look more deeply for the why behind the what.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2014

Article

Joy in the Montessori Classroom

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 26, no. 3

Pages: 44-45

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: In this article, the author states that it is a delight to walk into a Montessori classroom to the hum of children engaged in a variety of activities, especially when there is an accompanying feeling of joy and happiness. In desiring the peaceful calm of the classroom, educators may inadvertently hinder the joy, enthusiasm, and imagination that are not only a part of childhood but something adults also would benefit from cultivating within themselves. Ulrich says that if one could step into the sparkly light-up sneakers of a 3-year-old, they would discover what a fascinating place the world is and that it is it is hard not to be excited! Educators are asked to step back for a moment to consider the perspective of the child--to consider allowing joy, enthusiasm, and imagination to be spontaneously expressed, while still maintaining the peace of the classroom. Gently, with joy, imagination, and creativity, as well as a large dose of humor, educators should embrace whatever life is delivering into the classroom and use it to flow right back into peace. In so doing, educators create a classroom where children and adults work together to maintain harmony and peacefulness.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Intergenerational Learning in Higher Education: Making the Case for Multigenerational Classrooms

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: Educational Gerontology, vol. 40, no. 7

Pages: 473-485

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Abstract/Notes: Educational institutions in higher education both in Europe and in the United States are increasingly integrating lifelong learning in a context of sustained augmentation of age diversity among their students. Therefore, multiage and multigenerational classrooms are becoming more frequent teaching and learning settings. This article argues that multigenerational classrooms in formal higher education may constitute windows of opportunity to rethink the practice of teaching as far as they epitomize venues for triggering processes of intergenerational learning. This type of learning stems from an awareness of differences accrued through individual and group affiliation to diverse generational positions. Furthermore, the article provides conceptual delineation and insight regarding the practice of teaching and learning in multigenerational classrooms. Primarily concerned with how higher education instructors may see and understand multigenerational classrooms as distinctive settings for their teaching to lifelong learners, the authors explore how age differences among students and instructors can be framed in ways that contribute to content- and interaction-rich intergenerational teaching-learning processes. A multigenerational classroom is deemed to be one in which some of its members from various generations have a certain degree of generational awareness of belonging to different/same generations. Against attaching a specific set of attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors to people according to their generational affiliation, this article suggests that it is the dynamic relation between inter- and intragenerational differences and commonalities that needs to be taken into account when considering multigenerational classrooms.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1080/03601277.2013.844039

ISSN: 0360-1277

Article

Effect of Environmental Factors On Growth and Morbidity of Urban Montessori Children Receiving Supplementation

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: Ecology of Food and Nutrition, vol. 31, no. 3-4

Pages: 269-276

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Abstract/Notes: The roles of morbidity and environmental conditions in determining nutritional status were investigated in urban Montessori school children. In all, 265 children (30–60 months) were observed for weight, height, morbidity status and their household environmental conditions including hygiene, overcrowding, waste disposal methods and general housing background. The same sample was observed again after six months to assess their growth. Mean weight and height of all the children were 13.0 ± 1.4 kg and 95.9 ± 5.3 cm respectively. Relative gain in weight was observed to be 60–70 gms/kg during the six months period. Children were receiving total supplementation of about 170 kcal and about 5 g of protein per day. The children were divided into two classes according to their living conditions. Six factors formed the basis of scores which were used to classify all households into good and average environmental conditions. Those with better environmental conditions were associated with better nutritional status of children. The number of days lost due to sickness per ill child were smaller in houses with better scores. Relative gain in weight was negatively correlated with days lost due to illness suggesting synergistic effects of duration of illness and environment on nutritional status.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1080/03670244.1994.9991368

ISSN: 0367-0244

Article

Una Experiencia Didáctica a Través del Ambiente Montessori en la Enseñanza de la Matemática / A Didactic Experience Through the Montessori Environment in the Teaching of Mathematics

Available from: Red Iberoamericana de Pedagogía (REDIPE)

Publication: Revista Boletín Redipe, vol. 10, no. 11

Pages: 198-215

Mathematics education, Montessori materials, Montessori method of education

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Abstract/Notes: En didáctica de la matemática se ha realizado diversos estudios que buscan mejorar el proceso de enseñanza-aprendizaje; un sistema escolar alternativo como el método Montessori, tiene sólidos resultados socioemocionales y académicos en los niños, prácticamente no ha cambiado en más de un siglo, puede aplicarse en todos los años de la educación primaria y secundaria. La presente investigación tuvo como objetivo general implementar el Ambiente Montessori para el aprendizaje de cuerpos tridimensionales. Se enmarcó en una metodología cuantitativa. La muestra fue de 9 estudiantes y el instrumento fue una encuesta de satisfacción estudiantil. En los resultados más relevantes se observó que según una categoría de Sobresaliente el entorno cumple con las características del ambiente Montessori, de igual forma los materiales para el aprendizaje de cuerpos tridimensionales. En conclusión, el ambiente Montessori mejoró el rendimiento académico de los estudiantes, esto en contradicción con algunas investigaciones que ven al sistema como formador de un ser asocial, el mismo permite fortalecer relaciones interpersonales y con la naturaleza. / In didactics of mathematics, various studies have been carried in order to improve the teaching-learning process; an alternative school system such as the Montessori method, it has strong socio-emotional and academic results in children, it has not changed for more than a century practically, it can be applied in all years of primary and secondary education. The present investigation has as general objective to implement the Montessori Environment for the learning of three-dimensional bodies. It was supported in a quantitative methodology. The sample was constituted by nine students and the instruments were a participant observation sheet and a student satisfaction survey. In the most relevant results, it was observed according to a category of Outstanding, the environment complies with the characteristics of the Montessori environment, in the same way the materials for learning three-dimensional bodies. In conclusion, the Montessori environment improved the academic performance of the students, this research is in contradiction with some investigations that see the system as a trainer of an asocial human being, it allows to strengthen interpersonal relationships and with nature.

Language: English

DOI: 10.36260/rbr.v10i11.1527

ISSN: 2256-1536

Article

Diseño de ambientes para el juego: práctica y reflexión en educación infantil / Design of environments for the game: Practice and reflection in early childhood education

Available from: Universidade de Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

Publication: RELAdEI (Revista Latinoamericana de Educación Infantil), vol. 5, no. 1

Pages: 85-96

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Abstract/Notes: Esta investigación parte del supuesto que girar la mirada hacia el diseño de ambientes como dispositivo para potenciar el juego en la primera infancia, implica un movimiento en la comprensión de las prácticas docentes que podría llevar a cuestionarse, entre otros: el rol del maestro, las características en el desarrollo de los niños y las niñas, su necesidad de actividad libre y autónoma y su juego dentro de ambientes diseñados para tal fin. Este estudiocuyo objetivo fuepromover y estudiar la reflexión sobre el diseño de ambientes para el juego, desde la práctica de un grupo de profesores; se fundamenta en una visión de la educación cuyo fin específico es potenciar el desarrollo infantil. Se inspira en algunos autores representativos en el campo de estudio, como Montessori, Decroly, más recientemente, Malajovich, Glanzer, Abad, Hoyuelos, Schön, entre otros. El marco metodológico escogido es la investigación-acción desarrollando los ciclos de planeación, acción, observación, reflexión, con el grupo de docentes involucrados en el trabajo. El resultado más destacado de esta investigación fuehacer visible el saber que surge a partir de la reflexión de la propia experiencia, en torno al diseño de ambientes para el juego. Además de lo anterior contribuyó a que los maestros se sintieran reconocidos y valorados en su quehacer docente y permitió contemplar institucionalmente tiempos y espacios para el encuentro y la reflexión del colectivo de maestras. / This research focuses on the design of environments as a device to enhance the game in early childhood which implies a movement to the understanding of teaching practices that could lead to question, among other matters: the teachers’ role, the features of children’s development, the need for free and independent activity of play environments designed for that purpose. This study aims to promote reflection and study on the design of environments for play, from the practice of a group of teachers. It is based on a vision of education whose specific purpose is to promote child’s development, having as activities of the early childhood, game, art, literature and exploration of the environment, as well as the possibilities of expression, communication, interaction and approach to the culture of early childhood. It draws on some important authors in the field of study, such as Montessori, Decroly, Garvey and more recently, Malajovich, Glanzer, Abad, Hoyuelos, Schön, among others. The methodological framework chosen is the action research, developing cycles of planning, action, observation, and reflection, with the group of teachers involved in the work. The most outstanding result of this research was to make visible the knowledge that comes from the reflection of their own experience about the design of environments for play. Besides, the teachers felt recognized and valued in their teaching work. After that the group of teachers was granted with time and space for meetings and reflection activities.

Language: Spanish

ISSN: 2255-0666

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