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63 results

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Memory training improves cognitive ability in patients with dementia

Available from: University of California eScholarship

Publication: Neuropsychological Rehabilitation, vol. 11, no. 3/4

Pages: 245-261

Alzheimer's disease, Dementia, Gerontology, Montessori method of education, Montessori therapy, Montessori-Based Dementia Programming (MBDP), Montessori-based interventions (MBI)

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Language: English

DOI: 10.1080/09602010042000222

ISSN: 0960-2011

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

The Montessori Method in Dementia Care

Available from: Care Info

Publication: Journal of Dementia Care, vol. 20, no. 4

Pages: 18-19

Alzheimer's disease, Dementia, Gerontology, Montessori method of education, Montessori therapy, Montessori-Based Dementia Programming (MBDP), Montessori-based interventions (MBI)

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Abstract/Notes: Ten years ago Tom and Karen Brenner developed a new approach to caring for people with dementia – Montessori for Dementia Care. Here, they explain their programme and training for care staff

Language: English

ISSN: 1351-8372

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

A Systematic Review of Montessori-Based Activities for Persons With Dementia

Available from: ScienceDirect

Publication: Journal of the American Medical Directors Association, vol. 17, no. 2

Pages: 117-122

Alzheimer's disease, Dementia, Gerontology, Montessori method of education, Montessori therapy, Montessori-Based Dementia Programming (MBDP), Montessori-based interventions (MBI)

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Abstract/Notes: Montessori-based activities are becoming a popular approach for the care of older adults living with dementia. The aim of this study was to systematically assess the quality of the research examining the benefits of Montessori-based activities for persons with dementia. Six peer-reviewed databases were systematically searched for all relevant articles published until April 2015. Included articles were peer-reviewed studies published in English that employed Montessori-based activities with persons with dementia. Methodological quality was assessed by 2 independent raters using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database Scale or the Downs and Black evaluation tool. Levels of evidence were assigned to the study design using a modified Sackett scale. One hundred fifty articles were identified, and 14 were selected for inclusion. Level-2 evidence examining the impact of Montessori-based activities on eating behaviors suggested that difficulties with eating could be reduced with Montessori training. There was limited level-4 evidence for the benefits of Montessori-based activities on cognition, wherein benefits appeared to be specific to lower-level cognitive abilities including memory and attention. Finally, there is level-1 (n = 1), level-2 (n = 3), and level-4 (n = 6) evidence for the benefits of Montessori-based activities on engagement and affect, whereby constructive engagement and positive affect were heightened. Overall, there is a strong level of evidence for the benefits of Montessori-based activities on eating behaviors and weak evidence for the benefits on cognition. Evidence for the benefits of Montessori-based activities on engagement and affect are mixed. Future research is needed to examine the long-term benefits of Montessori-based activities.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1016/j.jamda.2015.10.006

ISSN: 1525-8610

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Effectiveness of Montessori-Based Activities on Agitation Among Asian Patients with Dementia: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

Available from: PubMed

Publication: Medicine (Baltimore), vol. 101, no. 32

Pages: e29847

Alzheimer's disease, Dementia, Gerontology, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Montessori therapy, Montessori-Based Dementia Programming (MBDP), Montessori-based interventions (MBI)

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Abstract/Notes: OBJECTIVES: Montessori based activity are supposed to be an effective nonpharmacological intervention in the treatment of agitation in western countries. However, most studies conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of Montessori based activities on agitation in Asian patients were small sample size, as well as inconsistent outcomes, which may limit the reliability of the conclusions. The present pooled analysis, hence, was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of the activity on agitation related with dementia in Asian patients with dementia. DESIGN: Prospective randomized clinical studies were included, of which available data was extracted. Outcomes of physical aggressive behaviors, physical nonaggressive behaviors, and verbal aggressive behaviors were pooled for the analysis by weighted mean differences. DATA SOURCES: Medline, Embase, Cochrane Library, China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), WanFang, and China Science and Technology Journal Database (VIP). ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA: Prospective, randomized, controlled clinical studies, conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of the activity on agitation related with dementia in Asian patients with dementia. DATA EXTRACTION AND SYNTHESIS: Available data including baseline characteristics and interested outcomes from the included literature were extracted independently by 2 investigators. Measuring scales including CMAI and NOSIE were adopted for the efficacy comparison between Montessori based activity and standard activity. Weighted mean difference was used for the pooled analysis. RESULTS: A total of 460 participants were included in the present meta-analysis. The pooled mean difference agitation for Montessori based activity was -3.86 (95% CI: -7.38 to -0.34, P = 0.03) comparing to standard activity. The pooled mean differences for physical aggressive behaviors, physical nonaggressive behaviors, and verbal aggressive behaviors in Montessori based activity group were -0.82 (95% CI: -1.10 to -0.55; P < 0.00001), -0.81 (95% CI: -1.68 to 0.55; P = 0.07), and 0.38 (95% CI: -0.92 to 1.68; P = 0.57). CONCLUSIONS: Montessori based activities may reduce the frequency of agitation, especially in physical aggressive behaviors comparing to standard activities in Asian patients with dementia. However, the effectiveness of Montessori based activities on reduction of subcategorized agitated behaviors including physical nonaggressive behaviors, and verbal aggressive behaviors may not be reliable as physical aggressive behaviors.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1097/MD.0000000000029847

ISSN: 1536-5964

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Approaches to engaging people with dementia in meaningful occupations in institutional settings: A scoping review

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, vol. 28, no. 5

Pages: 329-347

Alzheimer's disease, Dementia, Gerontology, Montessori method of education, Montessori therapy, Montessori-Based Dementia Programming (MBDP), Montessori-based interventions (MBI)

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Abstract/Notes: Background People with dementia in institutional settings lack engagement in meaningful occupations, which may cause decreased quality of life. Although many researchers and professionals have proposed approaches to engage people with dementia in these occupations, an overview seems to be missing. Aim This scoping review provides an overview by categorizing and describing the characteristics of the approaches. Material and method A thorough literature search in nine databases identified the studies on approaches. We included 54 studies, and extracted bibliometric data. A content analysis revealed the characteristics of the approaches. Results Four categories of approaches were uncovered. First, the literature defined the concept of meaningful occupation in various ways. Second, a category of approaches provided theoretical knowledge of meaningful occupations. The third category focussed on specific themes, such as certain methods. The final described comprehensive multilevel approaches. Conclusion This review contributes to knowledge of the diversity of approaches to engage people with dementia in meaningful occupation within institutional settings. Significance We suggest that occupational therapy researchers and practitioners consider how the concept of meaningful occupation is embedded in the theoretical landscape. Furthermore, activity programming requires reflexive decision-making at the policy and practice level, as engagement in meaningful occupations is complex.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1080/11038128.2020.1791952

ISSN: 1103-8128

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Special Feature: Montessori-Based Activities for Long-Term Care Residents with Dementia

Available from: Wolters Kluwer

Publication: Topics in Geriatric Rehabilitation, vol. 16, no. 1

Pages: 78-?

Alzheimer's disease, Dementia, Gerontology, Montessori materials, Montessori method of education, Montessori therapy, Montessori-Based Dementia Programming (MBDP), Montessori-based interventions (MBI)

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Language: English

ISSN: 0882-7524

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Montessori Success for People Living with Dementia

Available from: Care Info

Publication: Journal of Dementia Care, vol. 19, no. 2

Pages: 36-38

Alzheimer's disease, Dementia, Gerontology, Montessori method of education, Montessori therapy, Montessori-Based Dementia Programming (MBDP), Montessori-based interventions (MBI)

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Abstract/Notes: This pilot project used Montessori principles to improve mealtimes of people with dementia. The four residents involved in the project were given six Montessori activities to carry out each day. The activities helped hand-eye coordination, levels of concentration and problem solving. This in turn had a positive impact on residents well-being during mealtimes.

Language: English

ISSN: 1351-8372

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Efficacy of Activities of Daily Living Skill Training Using Motessori-Based Activties in Elderly with Early Stage Dementia

Available from: Thai Journals Online

Publication: Journal of the Psychiatric Association of Thailand, vol. 54, no. 3

Pages: 241-250

Alzheimer's disease, Asia, Dementia, Gerontology, Montessori method of education, Montessori therapy, Montessori-Based Dementia Programming (MBDP), Montessori-based interventions (MBI), Southeast Asia, Thailand

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Abstract/Notes: Objective: To compare ADL scores of elderly with early stage dementia who had attended Activities of Daily Living (ADL) skill training using Montessori-based activities with those who had not. Method: A quasi experimental study was conducted with Solomon Four Groups design experiment. The subjects consisted of 32 elderly living in Bang-Lamung senior home aged from 63-94 who met the inclusion criteria. They were diviecl into 2 qroups with 16 participants in each group then subgroup of 8 participants were selected to receive intervention and the controls were not. The screening instruments include mini mental status exam (MMSE-T2002) and Thai Geriatric Depression Scale (TGDS). Activities of Daily Living (ADL) scores of each subject were measured against Chula ADL index. The post test score was measured at the end of the 4th week, then the intervention was decreased and the follow-ups were measured at the end of the 8th and the 12th week. The data obtained was analyzed for descriptive statistics and the average ADL scores were compared by means of t-test and ANOVA. Results: The results showed that the average ADL pre-test scores of both groups were indifferent. The experimental groups average ADL scores of the post-test increased by 0.62 and the first follow up increased by 0.25 which are statistically significant at the level of p<0.05. Conclusion: Activities of Daily Living training using Montessori-based activities is effective in increasing ADL scores. It is recommended to be used as the activities for elderly with early stage dementia.

Language: Thai

ISSN: 2697-4126

Article

Development of Montessori-Based Activities for Korean Elderly with Dementia / 치매 노인을 위한 몬테소리 프로그램 개발

Publication: 노인복지연구 / Korean Journal of Gerontological Social Welfare, vol. 26

Pages: 119-141

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Language: Korean

ISSN: 1598-1649, 2671-812X

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

The Efficacy of Memory Training Using Montessori Philosophy-based Activities in Mild Dementia Elderly

Available from: Thai Journals Online

Publication: Journal of the Psychiatric Association of Thailand, vol. 54, no. 2

Pages: 197-208

Alzheimer's disease, Asia, Dementia, Gerontology, Maria Montessori - Philosophy, Montessori method of education, Montessori therapy, Montessori-Based Dementia Programming (MBDP), Montessori-based interventions (MBI), Southeast Asia, Thailand

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Abstract/Notes: AbstractObjective: To compare the memory scores in mild dementia elderly who attended Montessori-based Memory training with the control group who did not.Method: The Solomon four-group design was used to test the memory of the subjects. The subject of the study consisted of 40 elderly at Banbanglamung Social Welfare Development Center for Older Persons. Participants were divided to 2 experimental and 2 control groups by random sampling technique. Mini mental status Exam-Thai 2002 and Thai Geriatric Depression scale were used as a tool in selecting the subject and a tool to differentiate the mild dementia elderly group from the depressed group. The digit span and digit symbol subtests of The Wechsler Intelligence scale were used in memory testing. The data obtained was analyzed by means of descriptive statistics, t-test and one-way ANOVA.Results: The average scores of the digit span and digit symbol of the experimental groups and the controlled groups were significantly different (p<0.05). After 4 weeks of training, the average scores ofthe experimental groups increased more than that of the controlled group. After training, the average scores of memory of the four groups were significantly indifferent (p<0.05). Digit symbol scores of the experimental groups were higher than of the controlled groups by using LSD method.Conclusion: After memory training, the average scores of the digit span and digit symbol of the experimental groups were significantly higher than the controlled group. This differentce still persistedat the 12th week of training. Therefore, this memory training should be used with the elderly to prevent and delay dementia.

Language: Thai

ISSN: 2697-4126

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