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810 results

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Cosmic Education in Maria Montessori: Arts and Sciences as Resources for Human Development

Available from: Università Degli Studi Firenze

Publication: Studi sulla Formazione / Open Journal of Education, vol. 21, no. 2

Pages: 249-260

Cosmic education, Maria Montessori - Philosophy, ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: This article reflects on the concept of cosmic education set out by Maria Montessori in strict correlation to those of cosmic vision and cosmic plan. Cosmic education is considered here as a fundamental direction within the original core of the thought of Maria Montessori since the early twentieth century. Among the different orders of consideration that support the actuality of cosmic education, two are the object of analysis. The first concerns the content plan that aims to create interactions with the various disciplinary fields (scientific, historical and geographical education, etc.) as a unitary vision and development of knowledge. The second concerns the existential level: it embraces and summarizes the concepts of “ecological education”, “education for peace”, and “education for the world” in themselves to the point of recalling implications of ethical and aesthetic education.

Language: English

DOI: 10.13128/Studi_Formaz-24669

ISSN: 2036-6981

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

On Ki Hadjar Dewantara’s Philosophy of Education

Available from: Universitetsbiblioteket OsloMet

Publication: Nordic Journal of Comparative and International Education (NJCIE), vol. 5, no. 2

Pages: 65-78

Asia, Australasia, Indonesia, Ki Hadjar Dewantara - Philosophy, Maria Montessori - Philosophy, Southeast Asia, Taman Siswa

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Abstract/Notes: This comparative education article explores the purpose of education in the Indonesian context. My aim is to see if there are any differences between the purpose of education during the colonial era and present-day Indonesia. In order to do that, I draw mostly on the philosophy of Ki Hadjar Dewantara, who is regarded as the father of Indonesian education. This article is particularly relevant because the Indonesian government has recently started to critically re-examine two of the educational concepts proposed by Dewantara, which are "pendidikan karakter" (character education) and "merdeka belajar" (independent learning). In conceptualising education, Dewantara, who was influenced by Tagore, Montessori, and Fröbel, saw the importance of imparting local wisdom and values ignored by the colonial schools. Therefore, in this article, I will compare his educational views with the Dutch view of schooling during the colonial era. I will then look at Indonesia's current approach to education to find the similarities and differences of purpose relative to Dewantara's views of education. In this article, I argue that Dewantara's philosophy is still very much relevant today. I conclude that the Indonesian government should refer back to its history when defining education for its next generation.

Language: English

DOI: 10.7577/njcie.4156

ISSN: 2535-4051

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Montessori Education and a Neighborhood School: A Case Study of Two Early Childhood Education Classrooms

Available from: University of Kansas Libraries

Publication: Journal of Montessori Research, vol. 6, no. 1

Pages: 1-18

Americas, Comparative education, Montessori method of education - Evaluation, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Project SYNC (Systems, Yoked through Nuanced Collaboration) details perspectives of a community of stakeholders committed to the enhancement of early childhood (i.e., prekindergarten through grade 3) education. Although there is a growing number of public-school programs informed by the Montessori philosophy, Montessori educational experiences often take place within affluent communities. SYNC aimed to enhance the prekindergarten through grade 3 educational experiences for traditionally underserved students by transforming two traditional early childhood classrooms to Montessori settings within a diverse, Title I school. Montessori pedagogy, curricula, and materials aligned with the school’s dedicated commitment to social justice. The study, one in a series, explored the impact of Montessori education on a neighborhood school community as evidenced through stakeholder opinions, project implementation, and teacher attitudes. Project data illustrate that a Montessori educational experience created learning opportunities that supported children from culturally and ethnically diverse communities in a traditional, Title I elementary school.

Language: English

DOI: 10.17161/jomr.v6i1.8539

ISSN: 2378-3923

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Montessori, Waldorf, and Reggio Emilia: A Comparative Analysis of Alternative Models of Early Childhood Education

Available from: SpringerLink

Publication: International Journal of Early Childhood, vol. 52, no. 3

Pages: 337-353

Comparative education, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Reggio Emilia approach (Early childhood education) - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Waldorf method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc.

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Abstract/Notes: Montessori, Waldorf, and Reggio Emilia education remain three of the most popular models for alternative early childhood education. Each of these approaches has developed globally, with a rich history of supporting children’s educational freedom. This narrative analysis provides a means for early childhood educators and scholars to understand the aims, philosophical and theoretical frameworks, historical development, benefits, and challenges in these models and their methods of practice. As early childhood education evolves with technology and as re-conceptualizations about early education occur, an understanding of these alternatives to traditional education models is important. While adaptive options of these models may emerge in education systems across national contexts, this review allows educators to consider their applications and cultural appropriateness in specific local and community contexts.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1007/s13158-020-00277-1

ISSN: 0020-7187, 1878-4658

Article

Montessori-Pädagogik und die Blindenpädagogik [Montessori education and education for the blind]

Publication: Das Kind, no. 26

Pages: 74-78

Blind, Children with disabilities, Inclusive education, Montessori method of education

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Language: German

ISSN: 0949-2682

Doctoral Dissertation

Dispelling Perceptions: Montessori Education – Attaining Common Ground with Public Schools

Available from: University of California eScholarship

Montessori method of education, Public Montessori

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Abstract/Notes: Using concepts from cognitive science, this dissertation explored changes in perception among Montessori education leaders and traditional education leaders. Although Montessori education programs have grown as an option in the public school sector, their unique features in mainstream environments have brought to the fore serious challenges in understanding and communication between decision makers at the institutional level of public education and among Montessori academies. Nationally, Montessori education entities have fostered a strong momentum for improvement at the state policy level. However in some states, including California, differing perceptions still hinder inclusive decision making, resulting in lack of teacher credential recognition, denial of eligibility and funding. My study implemented a communication intervention through which an iterative conversation between both sides aimed to address perceptions and language and provide shared understandings. Using the challenge between Montessori and traditional public education and framed under the cognitive theories of mental models, framing, schemas, metaphors and embodiment, this intervention addressed whether perceptions can begin to shift when one is more fully informed at a deeper cognitive level. Incorporating a workshop intervention involving several modalities, my findings suggested a shift in perception which seemed to persist over time. The effects in shifting actors’ perceptions of Montessori education were statistically significant and modest in terms of magnitude. I also found a weaker perceptual shift among traditional educators in California compared with peers in other states. I obtained specific suggestions for future iterations of kinesthetic learning, along with how to best share perspectives between Montessori and traditional leaders, along with possible collaborations between these pedagogies.

Language: English

Published: Berkeley, California, 2016

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Preschoolers’ Attitudes, School Motivation, and Executive Functions in the Context of Various Types of Kindergarten

Available from: Frontiers in Psychology

Publication: Frontiers in Psychology, vol. 13

Pages: Article 823980

Comparative education, Czech Republic, Czechia, Eastern Europe, Europe, Montessori method of education - Evaluation, Religious education - Evaluation, Waldorf method of education - Evaluation

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Abstract/Notes: European policy has seen a number of changes and innovations in the field of early childhood preschool education over the last decade, which have been reflected in various forms in the policies of individual EU countries. Within the Czech preschool policy, certain innovations and approaches have been implemented in the field of early children education, such as the introduction of compulsory preschool education before entering primary school from 2017, emphasis on inclusive education, equal conditions in education and enabling state-supported diversity in the education concepts of kindergartens. The aim of our study was to assess the influence of various preschool education systems in the Czech Republic in the context of psychological variables reflecting selected children’s outcomes which may contribute to future school achievement. The monitored variables were the attitudes, motivations and executive functions of children in the last year of preschool education. A comparison was made between the traditional preschool education program and the so-called alternative types of preschool education, such as Montessori, Waldorf and religious schools. The total sample was divided into four subgroups, namely a group of children attending traditional kindergartens (731, 84.9%), religious (65, 7.5%), Montessori (35, 4.1%), and Waldorf (30, 3.5%) kindergartens. To determine empirical data, the following research methods were used: Attitude Questionnaire, School Performance Motivation Scale, and Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function (BRIEF). The results of our survey show the fact that the type of kindergarten attended has a significant effect on the child’s level of school performance motivation, attitudes toward school as well as executive functions. Significant differences were found between the different types of kindergartens attended in the monitored variables.

Language: English

DOI: 10.3389/fpsyg.2022.823980

ISSN: 1664-1078

Book

Education Before Five: A Handbook on Preschool Education

Available from: ERIC

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Abstract/Notes: This handbook was designed as a guide to acquaint child care workers and parents with the broad spectrum of preschool programs now in existence. In section I, theoretical approaches to preschool education such as Montessori, Piagetian, Progressive, Developmental-Interactionist, Behaviorist, and Psychoanalytic and the effects of these different approaches on practice are reviewed and discussed. Section II contains descriptions of a wide variety of center-based and home-based preschool programs and Section III presents a brief overview of the evaluation of preschool programs. In Section IV, some considerations and recommendations for establishing an effective preschool program are presented and in Section V, the importance of preschool education is examined. Section VI contains a discussion of trends, issues and future directions of preschool education. An extensive bibliography is included.

Language: English

Published: New York: Bank Street College of Education, 1977

Doctoral Dissertation

Montessori Education in Aotearoa-New Zealand: A Framework for Peace and Social Justice

Available from: Auckland University of Technology Library

Australasia, Australia and New Zealand, Montessori method of education, New Zealand, Oceania, Peace, Peace education, Social justice

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Abstract/Notes: In the first half of the 20th century, Maria Montessori (1870-1952) created a radical approach to early education that she believed had the potential to aid political and socio-cultural transformation on a global scale. This study utilises critical theory and insights from the reconceptualist early childhood education movement to contextualise the background and examine the currency of Montessori’s vision of social justice for the child and subsequent world peace. The research focuses on the reflections of graduates from the Bachelor of Education (Montessori Early Childhood Teaching), a model of teacher education developed at the Auckland University of Technology. The study utilised socio-biographical inquiry and case study as key research tools. Participants were drawn from graduates in their first, second and third year of early childhood teaching practice. The specialty degree aims to highlight the social advocacy role of Maria Montessori with regard to children’s rights and as teachers qualify and enter the field, the project explores differences and similarities that they meet in the interpretation of Montessori philosophy. Information was also sought on the factors that support or challenge the development and resilience of teachers during their first three years of practice in the field. In particular, the study considers the relationship between the philosophy and practice of Montessori teachers in Aotearoa-New Zealand with reference to Montessori’s vision and explores how a teacher preparation model can be authentically reconciled with a social justice perspective. Case studies in four early childhood centres exemplify how a framework derived from Montessori philosophy supports development of the ‘just community’. This research has yielded information on the development of effective practice in early childhood education using the construct of critically engaged pedagogy. Insights arising from the project may therefore contribute to advancing both the literature and practice of Montessori education and especially in the New Zealand teacher education context.

Language: English

Published: Auckland, New Zealand, 2011

Doctoral Dissertation

A Phenomenology of Educational Care: Early Adolescent Descriptions

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

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Abstract/Notes: School design and operation are, at times, counter-productive to cultivating academic and personal success in all students. Teachers often lack adequate preparation time, and are pressed by class size and regulatory mandates. Thus, there is seemingly little time to focus on cultivating affective well-being or a supportive educational climate. This lack of support is linked to high drop-out rates, large numbers of academically unsuccessful students, and the disenfranchisement of many minority and English Language learners in our school system. The phenomenon of care, particularly as it relates to education, has been studied only briefly. Few comprehensive, qualitative descriptions regarding how students conceptualize care exist despite significant evidence that when students perceive teachers and schools as caring, they have higher and more sustainable levels of academic motivation. This research project endeavored to give children a voice regarding educational care through a qualitative study on the phenomenon of care from an adolescent perspective. The study employed multiple data collection methods including: interviews, art, and student writing with students ages 11-14 from two school environments. Data collected were analyzed using the vanKamm phenomenological method of analysis. Results indicated that the phenomenon of educational care was a complex set of actions and behaviors from the student vantage point. Five themes emerged including: (1) Relationships are a critical aspect of educational care, (2) Rules in educational settings should be simple and consistent within classrooms and institutions, (3) Students perceive some control of their learning environments as caring, (4) Educational environments and teacher behavior are both critical to care, (5) Basic safety and concern for physical space are necessary for educational care. Each theme is independently necessary but not sufficient when observed alone in educational contexts. Together these themes support Nel Noddings' ideal version of ethical caring, in that they involve motivated behaviors, reciprocal action, receptivity on the part of the students, and a sense of obligation to care in a manner above and beyond noticing the basic well being of the student. The themes indicated by the data demonstrated a multifaceted view of educational care previously undiscovered and provide useful fodder for educators to consider.

Language: English

Published: St. Louis, Missouri, 2010

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