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508 results

Article

The Concept of Cosmic Education in Montessori Education [part 2]

Publication: Montessori Kyōiku [Montessori Education], no. 15

Pages: 14-21

Cosmic education, Montessori method of education

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Language: Japanese

ISSN: 0913-4220

Doctoral Dissertation

Montessori Education in Aotearoa-New Zealand: A Framework for Peace and Social Justice

Available from: Auckland University of Technology Library

Australasia, Australia and New Zealand, Montessori method of education, New Zealand, Oceania, Peace, Peace education, Social justice

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Abstract/Notes: In the first half of the 20th century, Maria Montessori (1870-1952) created a radical approach to early education that she believed had the potential to aid political and socio-cultural transformation on a global scale. This study utilises critical theory and insights from the reconceptualist early childhood education movement to contextualise the background and examine the currency of Montessori’s vision of social justice for the child and subsequent world peace. The research focuses on the reflections of graduates from the Bachelor of Education (Montessori Early Childhood Teaching), a model of teacher education developed at the Auckland University of Technology. The study utilised socio-biographical inquiry and case study as key research tools. Participants were drawn from graduates in their first, second and third year of early childhood teaching practice. The specialty degree aims to highlight the social advocacy role of Maria Montessori with regard to children’s rights and as teachers qualify and enter the field, the project explores differences and similarities that they meet in the interpretation of Montessori philosophy. Information was also sought on the factors that support or challenge the development and resilience of teachers during their first three years of practice in the field. In particular, the study considers the relationship between the philosophy and practice of Montessori teachers in Aotearoa-New Zealand with reference to Montessori’s vision and explores how a teacher preparation model can be authentically reconciled with a social justice perspective. Case studies in four early childhood centres exemplify how a framework derived from Montessori philosophy supports development of the ‘just community’. This research has yielded information on the development of effective practice in early childhood education using the construct of critically engaged pedagogy. Insights arising from the project may therefore contribute to advancing both the literature and practice of Montessori education and especially in the New Zealand teacher education context.

Language: English

Published: Auckland, New Zealand, 2011

Article

Education for the Handicapped Under the Viewpoint of Montessori Education

Publication: Montessori Kyōiku [Montessori Education], no. 28

Pages: 106-114

Children with disabilities, Inclusive education, Montessori method of education, People with disabilities

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Language: Japanese

ISSN: 0913-4220

Article

Basic Education and the Montessori Method [Gandhi's Wardha Scheme of Basic Education]

Publication: The Montessori Magazine: A Quarterly Journal for Teachers, Parents and Social Workers (India), vol. 1, no. 2/3

Pages: 44-49

Comparative education, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Wardha scheme of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc.

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Language: English

Article

The Effect of Montessori Programme on the Motion and Visual Perception Skills of Trainable Mentally Retarded Individuals

Available from: RedFame

Publication: Journal of Education and Training Studies, vol. 7, no. 2

Pages: 120-128

Asia, Children with disabilities, Inclusive education, Middle East, Montessori method of education, Turkey, Western Asia

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Abstract/Notes: In this research, it is aimed to examine the effects of Montessori education on the mentally retarded individuals in the special education who have had Montessori education and who have not had it. 24 trainable mentally disabled male students who had and did not have Montessori education in a private school in Kayseri participated in the study. The students were between the ages of 20-22. 12 voluntary participants constituted the experimental group who had Montessori education. The control group included 12 voluntary mentally disabled individuals. While the control group had a routine training for 8 weeks, the experimental group had Montessori education program for 8 weeks. In addition, mothers of the students in the experimental group were included in the training program. The mentally disabled individuals had movement and visual perception skills tests.When the results of the movement perception skills in the experimental and control groups were reviewed, no significant differences were found in the movement skill variables according to the values (p>0.05). While the pretest posttest values in the mentally retarded individuals in the experimental group revealed significant difference (p<0,05), no difference occurred only in the left foot balance test (p>0,05). All pretest posttest values depending on the movement revealed significant difference in the control group (p<0,05).As a result, when the effect of the Montessori program on the movement skills of trainable mentally retarded people was examined, no significant difference was found between the values of the control group, and Montessori education gave similar values as the classical education. Thus, it was concluded that it was advisable Montessori education program to be used widely. When its effect on the visual perception skills was examined, it could be stated that the posttest averages of the each visual perception sub-scale average revealed an increase except the shape-ground connection. Consequently, when the movement skills of the trainable mentally retarded individuals were reviewed, no difference was found in the control group values, and Montessori education values were similar to classical education. Therefore, it is concluded that Montessori education program should be used widely.

Language: English

DOI: 10.11114/jets.v7i2.3875

ISSN: 2324-8068

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

Effects of Peace Education and Grace and Courtesy Education on Social Problem-Solving Skills and Social Awareness

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research, Grace and courtesy, Montessori method of education, Peace education

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Abstract/Notes: This action research studied the impact of peace education and portions of the Positive Discipline curriculum in a three-six primary Montessori classroom. During five weeks of implementing the research, sixteen students participated in class meetings for twenty minutes a day. The peace table activities and wheel of choice lessons were conducted individually and as a whole class. The peace table activities included a set of mini dishes on a tray, a rain stick, and a peace rose. The wheel of choice consisted of pictures and words of examples of what students could choose to help them solve problems. A few examples are count to ten, apologize, ask for help, and write your name on the agenda. Implementing the presentations into the classroom environment became a work for the students to use if needed and did not occur daily. As a work choice, the previous activities were available on tables and children were allowed to choose the work as many times as they felt was necessary. The research began with baseline data collection through SWIS (School Wide Information System) referral records, student interviews, and student surveys. Sources of data obtained during the study included interviews, surveys, observation tally sheets, and a field journal. The results presented an increase in social awareness and problem-solving skills through the class meetings. Students began acknowledging problems and brainstorming solutions. Class meetings will continue daily to extend the positive problem-solving capabilities and mindfulness students developed in their classroom community.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2016

Book

Education Before Five: A Handbook on Preschool Education

Available from: ERIC

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Abstract/Notes: This handbook was designed as a guide to acquaint child care workers and parents with the broad spectrum of preschool programs now in existence. In section I, theoretical approaches to preschool education such as Montessori, Piagetian, Progressive, Developmental-Interactionist, Behaviorist, and Psychoanalytic and the effects of these different approaches on practice are reviewed and discussed. Section II contains descriptions of a wide variety of center-based and home-based preschool programs and Section III presents a brief overview of the evaluation of preschool programs. In Section IV, some considerations and recommendations for establishing an effective preschool program are presented and in Section V, the importance of preschool education is examined. Section VI contains a discussion of trends, issues and future directions of preschool education. An extensive bibliography is included.

Language: English

Published: New York: Bank Street College of Education, 1977

Article

The Significance of 'Play' and 'Work' in the Infant Education: Through the Comparison of F. Fröbel with M. Montessori

Available from: J-Stage

Publication: Studies in the History of Education, vol. 17

Pages: 67-83

Comparative education, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Friedrich Fröbel - Philosophy, Kindergarten (Froebel system of education) - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Maria Montessori - Philosophy, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc.

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Language: Japanese

DOI: 10.15062/kyouikushigaku.17.0_67

ISSN: 2189-4485, 0386-8982

Book

Studien zur Montessori-Pädagogik I: Maria Montessori und die "reform-pädagogische Bewegung" [Studies on Montessori Education I: Maria Montessori and the "New Education Movement"]

Europe, Maria Montessori - Biographic sources, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., New Education Fellowship, New Education Movement, Theosophical Society, Theosophy

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Language: German

Published: Freiburg, Germany: Herder, 1986

ISBN: 978-3-451-20919-2

Doctoral Dissertation

A Phenomenology of Educational Care: Early Adolescent Descriptions

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

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Abstract/Notes: School design and operation are, at times, counter-productive to cultivating academic and personal success in all students. Teachers often lack adequate preparation time, and are pressed by class size and regulatory mandates. Thus, there is seemingly little time to focus on cultivating affective well-being or a supportive educational climate. This lack of support is linked to high drop-out rates, large numbers of academically unsuccessful students, and the disenfranchisement of many minority and English Language learners in our school system. The phenomenon of care, particularly as it relates to education, has been studied only briefly. Few comprehensive, qualitative descriptions regarding how students conceptualize care exist despite significant evidence that when students perceive teachers and schools as caring, they have higher and more sustainable levels of academic motivation. This research project endeavored to give children a voice regarding educational care through a qualitative study on the phenomenon of care from an adolescent perspective. The study employed multiple data collection methods including: interviews, art, and student writing with students ages 11-14 from two school environments. Data collected were analyzed using the vanKamm phenomenological method of analysis. Results indicated that the phenomenon of educational care was a complex set of actions and behaviors from the student vantage point. Five themes emerged including: (1) Relationships are a critical aspect of educational care, (2) Rules in educational settings should be simple and consistent within classrooms and institutions, (3) Students perceive some control of their learning environments as caring, (4) Educational environments and teacher behavior are both critical to care, (5) Basic safety and concern for physical space are necessary for educational care. Each theme is independently necessary but not sufficient when observed alone in educational contexts. Together these themes support Nel Noddings' ideal version of ethical caring, in that they involve motivated behaviors, reciprocal action, receptivity on the part of the students, and a sense of obligation to care in a manner above and beyond noticing the basic well being of the student. The themes indicated by the data demonstrated a multifaceted view of educational care previously undiscovered and provide useful fodder for educators to consider.

Language: English

Published: St. Louis, Missouri, 2010

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