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1261 results

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

The Long-Term Benefits of Montessori Pre-K for Latinx Children from Low-Income Families

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: Applied Developmental Science, vol. 26, no. 2

Pages: 252-266

Latin American community

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Abstract/Notes: This study used covariate adjusted regression techniques to compare the third-grade outcomes of low-income Latinx children who attended Montessori pre-K programs (n = 161) with those who graduated from more conventional programs (n = 4975) in Miami-Dade County, Florida. Children who experienced one year of Montessori education demonstrated stronger pre-academic skills at the end of pre-K and, in turn, performed better on standardized assessments of math and reading in third grade than those who did not. No differences emerged in students’ identification as gifted and talented nor in third-grade GPA. Taken together, these findings suggest that the benefits of one year of Montessori at age 4 may carry forward over time and to the extent that they do, these benefits are attributed to the fact that Montessori graduates entered kindergarten more ready academically. At the same time, however, the persisting benefits of Montessori were 60–70% smaller four years after program exit and were less robust than the end of pre-K outcomes.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1080/10888691.2020.1781632

ISSN: 1088-8691, 1532-480X

Book Section

A Community Based Approach to Educational Reform in Puerto Rico

Available from: Google Books

Book Title: Colonial Dilemma: Critical Perspectives on Contemporary Puerto Rico

Pages: 157-172

Americas, Caribbean, Latin America and the Caribbean, Public Montessori, Puerto Rico

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Abstract/Notes: Briefly mentions Juan Ponce de León community school.

Language: English

Published: Troy, New York: South End Press, 1993

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Moral Beginnings: The Just Community in Montessori Pre‐Schools

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: Journal of Moral Education, vol. 11, no. 1

Pages: 41-46

Ethics, Grace and courtesy, Montessori method of education

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Abstract/Notes: Kohlberg's concept of a just community has been instituted, in varying degrees and at various levels, from the early elementary years upward. It is argued here that, although pre‐school children are developmentally unprepared for the in‐depth classroom discussions and reasoning called for by Kohlbergian theory, they are nevertheless capable of creating a just community in simplified, or embryonic, form. It is further argued that this pre‐school concept has been in existence since Maria Montessori established her first Children's House. A comparison of the Kohlberg and Montessori models is made showing their compatibility in both theory and practice. Further analysis shows that developmentally the two work well as a sequence for children's moral growth.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1080/0305724810110104

ISSN: 0305-7240

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

The Effects of Community Building Music on Transition Time in an Early Childhood Montessori Classroom

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

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Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this action research study was to determine how community building music would affect the transition time in a primary Montessori classroom. The researchers were two female preschool teachers in public Montessori schools. The participants, aged three to six years old, were involved in a daily clean-up time, which took place before the study began. The teachers added a music intervention for four weeks to see if the dynamics of clean-up time would change. The teachers documented the research study using qualitative and quantitative data tools. The data tools included student surveys, teacher journals, a timer log, and a classroom tracker sheet. The intervention findings showed an overall decrease in the amount of time students took to clean up and an increase in happiness and community involvement in the classroom. Future researchers should consider the pre and post student survey be completed on an individual basis. Additionally, increase the length of baseline data collection and intervention.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2020

Article

Community, Freedom, and Discipline in a Caring Montessori Environment

Available from: ERIC

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 39, no. 1

Pages: 129-140

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Abstract/Notes: John McNamara's historically rich descriptions of his adolescent community life in one school where he taught the same children from grade one to grade eight sends a warm message of the merge of elementary and middle-school personalities as they are beginning to understand the wonder of growing up. Their letters and speeches remember the impact of their Montessori community as they look at their own knowledge and humanity. His students speak simple truths about how their school made them comfortable with themselves, their classmates, and their work in the past and present and for the future. [This is an update of an article first printed in "The NAMTA Journal" 31.1 (2006, Winter): 69-77.]

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

Community Building in Schools

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 44, no. 1

Pages: 36-46

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Abstract/Notes: Working in the urban environment of Dallas, Texas, executive director of Lumin Education Terry Ford shows how schools which might normally be competing with each other can support each other instead and forge a community amongst themselves, ultimately serving the families of the area more successfully. Ford highlights using the classroom model of the prepared environment and the core value of grace and courtesy to help build widespread community by fostering a culture of mutual respect, compassion, and love.

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

From Holland to Hamburg: The Experimental and Community Schools of Hamburg Seen Through the Eyes of Dutch Observers (1919–1933)

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: Paedagogica Historica: International Journal of the History of Education, vol. 50, no. 5

Pages: 615-630

Europe, Germany, Holland, Netherlands, New Education Fellowship, New Education Movement, Theosophical Society, Theosophy, Western Europe

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Abstract/Notes: In the period 1919–1933 the experimental and community schools in Hamburg tried to put into practice a new model of schooling without a set curriculum that was based on providing a considerable amount of freedom for pupils and teachers. These experiences were introduced in the Netherlands by way of magazines published by the New Education Fellowship (NEF) or Dutch journals edited by educationalists and university professors. The Hamburg schools were also visited by Christian Anarchist teachers who were connected with new schools in the Netherlands and who already had experimented with new ways of life in small communities. In this article we describe their experiences in Hamburg. Their observation reports would not trigger a growing interest in a social community type of schooling; in general Dutch teachers, even the socialist ones, did not change their preference for the traditional classroom system of education. More individualistic methods from Montessori and Parkhurst (Dalton Plan), supported by university professors and inspectors of education, were considered to have more potential for changing the classroom system from within.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1080/00309230.2014.927513

ISSN: 0030-9230, 1477-674X

Article

Practical Life: The Keystone of Life, Culture, and Community

Available from: ERIC

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 38, no. 2

Pages: 47-54

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Abstract/Notes: Uma Ramani's characterization of practical life is philosophical and anthropological, suggesting that "human history is the story of the evolution of our practical life activities." Practical life is a collaborative activity that creates community and culture. One's adaptation to life through the daily work of ordering our environment lends meaning to all learning and to living a good life. [This article is based on a talk presented at the NAMTA conference titled "Whole School Practical Life: A Comprehensive View of Community, the Intelligence, and the Hand," Dallas, TX, January 17-20, 2013.]

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Project Friends: A Multi-age Learning Community

Available from: Springer Link

Publication: Early Childhood Education Journal, vol. 24, no. 4

Pages: 217-221

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Abstract/Notes: Project Friends is a learning community based on our confidence in the multi-age classroom as a valuable and viable vehicle for teaching young children. Our three multi-age classrooms of kinder-garten, first- and second-grade children were the served as the setting for Project Friends. In this article, we share our beginnings, significant features and outcomes of the learning community, and our reflections on a year ended in Project Friends. Our experiences and the experiences of the children in the multi-age classrooms continue to provide rich contexts for teaching and learning in the elementary school.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1007/BF02354835

ISSN: 1082-3301, 1573-1707

Book Section

A Quartet of American Montessori Directresses

Available from: Springer Link

Book Title: America's Early Montessorians: Anne George, Margaret Naumburg, Helen Parkhurst and Adelia Pyle

Pages: 3-35

Adelia Pyle - Biographic sources, Americas, Anne E. George - Biographic sources, Helen Parkhurst - Biographic sources, Margaret Naumburg - Biographic sources, Montessori method of education - History, Montessori schools, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: America’s Early Montessorians tells the history of the introduction and implementation of Montessori education in the United States, through the careers of Anne George, Margaret Naumburg, Helen Parkhurst, and Adelia Pyle who Maria Montessori trained as directresses. The chapter provides parallel biographies of George, Pyle, Parkhurst, and Naumburg before their enrollment in Montessori’s training courses. Anne Everett George (1878–1973), the first American trained as a directress, was America’s pioneer Montessori educator. Born in Missouri, George became a private school teacher and taught in Maryland, New York, and Chicago’s Latin School. Adelia McAlpin Pyle (1888–1968) the daughter of a wealthy manufacturer, James Tolman Pyle, was born in New York and educated by private tutors. She was fluent in French, German, Italian, and Spanish. Helen Parkhurst (1886–1973), who was born in Wisconsin, earned her degree in education from the Wisconsin State Normal School in River Falls in 1909. Parkhurst taught in public elementary schools in Wisconsin and Washington and became the Director of Primary Training in Wisconsin’s State Normal School at Stevens Point. Margaret Naumburg (1890–1963), born in New York, received her elementary and secondary education in private schools including the Horace Mann School and the laboratory school at Columbia University’s Teachers College. She was awarded her B.A. degree in June 1912 from Barnard College and did graduate study at the London School of Economics.

Language: English

Published: Cham, Switzerland: Palgrave Macmillan, 2020

ISBN: 978-3-030-54835-3

Series: Historical Studies in Education

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