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609 results

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

The Effects of Daily Art Activities on Attention in Elementary Students

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research, Attention in children, Lower elementary

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Abstract/Notes: The goal of this action research project was to investigate the effects of morning art activities on student focus. The intervention took place over five weeks at a public elementary school. Nineteen students participated in a lower elementary Montessori classroom of six to nine year olds. The qualitative and quantitative data collected were student surveys, behavior tally sheets, student and teacher assessments, field observations and conversations. The evidence showed a relationship between daily art activities and student concentration. The students increased their time on task while writing reflections about their artwork throughout the five-week study. Future research could examine the role of art on students’ social emotional development and how art exploration develops cooperation.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2016

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

The Effects of Reading Fluency in the Elementary Montessori Classroom

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research, Lower elementary, Montessori method of education, Upper elementary

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Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this research was to identify ways of improving reading fluency for elementary children in grades first through sixth. Children scoring below the 40th percentile on reading standardized test scores, determined our testing population. Four data collections tools were used, including a child-centered survey, a reading fluency rubric, teacher observations, and fluency graphs. The Read Naturally Program was used as the reading fluency intervention. Students made fluency progress in both the upper and lower elementary levels. This research highlights the importance of reading fluency interventions. Further research might focus on self reflection for children using the iPad Read Naturally Program.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2016

Article

Academic Achievement Outcomes: A Comparison of Montessori and Non-Montessori Public Elementary School Students

Available from: Journal of Elementary Education

Publication: Journal of Elementary Education, vol. 25, no. 1

Pages: 39-53

Americas, Comparative education, Montessori method of education - Evaluation, North America, United States of America, ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Within the realm of elementary public schools, several pedagogical models of early childhood education are practiced in the United States (Lillard, 2005). The constructivist approach to early childhood education is illustrative of best practices based on current theory. One model of constructivist early childhood education is the Montessori Method founded in the early twentieth century by Maria Montessori, an Italian physician (Montessori, 1912/1964). Though the Montessori Method is aligned with research-based best practices espoused by constructivism, there are relatively few public Montessori schools currently in the United States. A direct comparison is needed between the academic outcomes of public elementary school programs which implement the Montessori Method and those which implement a more traditional approach to early childhood education. The focus of this study is the academic achievement outcomes of Montessori public school students as compared to similar non-Montessori students. The Montessori students’ Iowa Tests of Basic Skills (ITBS) Total Reading and Total Math scores in grades one and two were not statistically different than their non-Montessori counterparts. In grade three, the Montessori students’ Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) Reading and Math scores were not statistically different than those of the non-Montessori students. In grades four and five, the TAKS Reading and Math scores statistically favored Montessori students.

Language: English

ISSN: 2227-1090, 1991-8100

Doctoral Dissertation

Assessing Relationships Among Autonomy, Supportive Leadership, and Burnout in Public Elementary Teachers

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

Self-determination, Self-determination theory

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Abstract/Notes: Stress and burnout among teachers are serious problems because of the negative consequences associated with them that have contributed to the current crisis in the American education system. Until the problems of teacher stress and burnout are understood and addressed, efforts to restructure American education cannot succeed. This study assessed the relationships among perceived autonomy, perceived transformational leadership style and burnout in public elementary teachers, and the moderating/mediatinginfluence of teacher orientation (Montessori and traditional) on burnout levels. An integration of Maslach’s multi-dimensional burnout theory, self-determination theory, and the theory of transformational leadership formed the theoretical foundation of the study. A nonexperimental correlational design was used with survey methodology. A convenience sample of 82 public elementary teachers were recruited via educator social media sites and professional associations. Participants completed an online survey viaSurvey Monkey. Multiple regression analyses determined strong negative relationships among the predictor variables and the three dimensions of burnout as well as the significant predictive power of the independent variables. Moderation analyses determined a significant influence of teacher orientation across these relationships. The mediation analysis determined that teaching autonomy was a significant mediator between teacher orientation and emotional exhaustion burnout. The results from this study may be used for positive social change by developing strategies to mitigate burnout in public elementary teachers, increase engagement, improve teacher retention, ultimately improving student achievement and engagement.

Language: English

Published: Minneapolis, Minnesota, 2022

Article

Designing the Montessori Coaching Tool Elementary Rubric for Early-Career Professional Development

Available from: University of Kansas Libraries

Publication: Journal of Montessori Research, vol. 7, no. 2

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Abstract/Notes: Becoming a competent Montessori Elementary guide is a complex process, so we are developing the Montessori Coaching Tool Elementary (MCT-EL) rubric to describe teaching-practice expectations for self-reflection and formative feedback during the critical early period in a teacher’s development. The purpose of this article is to share results from a small-scale, online survey collecting both qualitative and quantitative feedback on the rubric from experienced Montessori Elementary teacher educators. The rubric’s content was based on Maria Montessori’s writings and welldocumented Montessori practices, which we translated to specific teacher behaviors and developmental progressions. We wanted to gauge the MCT-EL rubric’s usefulness and appropriateness from the perspective of experts who have significant depth of experience mentoring new teachers. The rubric was not developed to be used for performance evaluation, promotion, or retention but rather for early-career Montessori teachers’ self-reflection. It provides a framework for coaching conversations between the early-career Montessori teacher and a Montessori mentor. Results from the study identified overall support for use of the MCT-EL rubric with developing teachers, along with specific recommendations for revisions, additions, and deletions. Using a thorough review of the data, we developed a refined MCT-EL rubric, which is provided in Appendix B and is available for use by interested practitioners in the field.

Language: English

DOI: 10.17161/jomr.v7i2.15866

ISSN: 2378-3923

Article

Elementary Teacher's Conceptions of Inquiry Teaching: Messages for Teacher Development

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: Journal of Science Teacher Education, vol. 23, no. 2

Pages: 159-175

Americas, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., North America, Teacher attitudes, Teacher training, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: This study explored practicing elementary school teacher’s conceptions of teaching in ways that foster inquiry-based learning in the science curriculum (inquiry teaching). The advocacy for inquiry-based learning in contemporary curricula assumes the principle that students learn in their own way by drawing on direct experience fostered by the teacher. That students should be able to discover answers themselves through active engagement with new experiences was central to the thinking of eminent educators such as Pestalozzi, Dewey and Montessori. However, even after many years of research and practice, inquiry learning as a referent for teaching still struggles to find expression in the average teachers’ pedagogy. This study drew on interview data from 20 elementary teachers. A phenomenographic analysis revealed three conceptions of teaching for inquiry learning in science in the elementary years of schooling: (a) The Experience-centered conception where teachers focused on providing interesting sensory experiences to students; (b) The Problem-centered conception where teachers focused on engaging students with challenging problems; and (c) The Question-centered conception where teachers focused on helping students to ask and answer their own questions. Understanding teachers’ conceptions has implications for both the enactment of inquiry teaching in the classroom as well as the uptake of new teaching behaviors during professional development, with enhanced outcomes for engaging students in Science.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1007/s10972-011-9251-2

ISSN: 1046-560X, 1573-1847

M.S.Ed Dissertation

Identifying Challenges to the Future of Public Montessori Elementary Schools

Available from: AMS Website

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Abstract/Notes: Based on an online survey with 85 principals and other leaders in public Montessori elementary schools, this study provides an update on the characteristics of Montessori education in public elementary schools as they begin facing the new challenges of No Child Left Behind (NCLB). Despite the lack of emphasis on traditional testing practices in Montessori education, the study finds that many schools have participated in standardized testing programs for many years and that support for testing practices does not differ between those with and those without Montessori certification. Even though they struggle with budget cuts, stricter state and federal requirements and teacher shortages, public Montessori elementary schools strive to maintain a unique educational environment through certified teachers, ongoing professional support for teachers and well-equipped classrooms.

Language: English

Published: Kansas, 2005

Master's Thesis

Practical Partnership: An Interactive Montessori Elementary Handbook for Teachers and Parents

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

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Abstract/Notes: Parent-teacher partnership could dramatically improve educational outcomes for students (Bikmaz & Guler, 2003; Epstein, 2001). However, most teachers and parents lack knowledge and resources for creating this relationship (Christenson, 2004; Epstein, 2001; Henderson & Mapp, 2002). The interactive handbook is a tool for Montessori elementary educators and parents that addresses the common barriers to connection and develops a partnership to provide a continuation of lessons and values from the classroom to the home. The implementation is focused on the Montessori elementary context as it correlates to the "cosmic education" philosophy. Current parents and teachers in the public and private sector of Montessori elementary education evaluated the handbook, and their feedback was incorporated to be the most relevant and effective tool possible.

Language: English

Published: Moraga, California, 2011

Article

Montessori Elementary Philosophy Reflects Current Motivation Theories

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 23, no. 1

Pages: 22-33

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Montessori's theories, developed more than 100 years ago, certainly resonate with current psychological research on improving education. Autonomy, interest, competence, and relatedness form the foundation for three contemporary efforts to organize the vast literature on motivation into a parsimonious theory. These four elements also comprise fundamental aspects of Montessori elementary educational practice. By integrating modern motivation theory development with well-established Montessori practice, one could argue that Maria Montessori was a woman before her time. She was passionate in the early 1900s about the importance of students becoming actively engaged in their own learning. Montessori schools around the world today live that vision through practices that are beginning to be recognized as crucial to the formation of internal motivation. (Contains 1 figure.)

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Master's Thesis

Academic Achievement Outcomes: Montessori and Non-Montessori Public Elementary Students

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

Academic achievement, Americas, Comparative education, Early childhood care and education, Elementary education, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, North America, Public Montessori, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Within the realm of elementary public schools, several pedagogical models of early childhood education are practiced in the United States (Lillard, 2007). The constructivist approach to early childhood education is illustrative of best practices based on current theory. One model of constructivist early childhood education is the Montessori Method founded in the early twentieth century by Maria Montessori, an Italian physician (Montessori, 1912/1964). Though the Montessori Method is aligned with research-based best practices espoused by constructivism, there are relatively few public Montessori schools currently in the United States. A direct comparison is needed between the academic outcomes of public elementary school programs which implement the Montessori Method and those which implement a more traditional approach to early childhood education. The focus of this study is the academic achievement outcomes of Montessori public school students as compared to similar non-Montessori students.

Language: English

Published: Commerce, Texas, 2013

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