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535 results

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Montessori, Waldorf, and Reggio Emilia: A Comparative Analysis of Alternative Models of Early Childhood Education

Available from: SpringerLink

Publication: International Journal of Early Childhood, vol. 52, no. 3

Pages: 337-353

Comparative education, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Reggio Emilia approach (Early childhood education) - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Waldorf method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc.

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Abstract/Notes: Montessori, Waldorf, and Reggio Emilia education remain three of the most popular models for alternative early childhood education. Each of these approaches has developed globally, with a rich history of supporting children’s educational freedom. This narrative analysis provides a means for early childhood educators and scholars to understand the aims, philosophical and theoretical frameworks, historical development, benefits, and challenges in these models and their methods of practice. As early childhood education evolves with technology and as re-conceptualizations about early education occur, an understanding of these alternatives to traditional education models is important. While adaptive options of these models may emerge in education systems across national contexts, this review allows educators to consider their applications and cultural appropriateness in specific local and community contexts.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1007/s13158-020-00277-1

ISSN: 0020-7187, 1878-4658

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

The Comparison of the Intuitive Mathematic Skills of Preschool Children Who Take Education According to Ministry of National Education Preschool Education Program and Montessori Approach

Available from: IISTE - International Knowledge Sharing Platform

Publication: International Journal of Scientific and Technological Research, vol. 6, no. 6

Pages: 167

Asia, Comparative education, Mathematics education, Middle East, Montessori method of education, Preschool children, Preschool education, Turkey, Western Asia

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Abstract/Notes: This study analyzed intuitive mathematics abilities of preschool children and to ascertain whether there was a difference between children who were educated according to the Ministry of National Education (MoNE) preschool education program and the Montessori approach. It was also examined whether the intuitive mathematics abilities of the children who were educated according to the MoNE program and Montessori approach showed a significant difference according to variables of gender, duration of pre-school education, and educational levels of parents. The study sample of the study consisted of 121 children (56 girls, 65 boys) aged between 60-72 months. The data was collected via “Personal Information Form” and “Intuitive Mathematics Ability Scale” developed by Güven (2001). Intuitive mathematical abilities of children who were educated according to the Montessori program were more developed compared to those of children educated according to MoNE program. There was no significant difference in intuitive mathematical abilities according to duration of preschool education, education levels of parents. As a result of the study, a significant difference was observed in the intuitive math abilities of the children trained according to the MoNE program in favor of the girls, whereas no significant difference was observed trained according to the Montessori approach. The results are discussed in light of the relevant literature.

Language: Turkish

DOI: 10.7176/JSTR/6-06-12

ISSN: 2422-8702

Book

Studien zur Montessori-Pädagogik I: Maria Montessori und die "reform-pädagogische Bewegung" [Studies on Montessori Education I: Maria Montessori and the "New Education Movement"]

Europe, Maria Montessori - Biographic sources, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., New Education Fellowship, New Education Movement, Theosophical Society, Theosophy

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Language: German

Published: Freiburg, Germany: Herder, 1986

ISBN: 978-3-451-20919-2

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Training of Undergraduate Preschool Teachers in Montessori Education in Slovakia and the Czech Republic

Available from: SCIndeks

Publication: Istraživanja u Pedagogiji / Research in Pedagogy, vol. 11, no. 1

Pages: 137-150

Czech Republic, Czechia, Eastern Europe, Europe, Slovakia, Trainings

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Abstract/Notes: The paper presents a description and comparison of the undergraduate student teacher training and kindergarten teacher continuing education in the Montessori Method of Education encompassed in formal education in Slovakia and the Czech Republic. The theoretical part of the paper aims at depicting Montessori education, still an attractive pedagogical direction in both countries, in a thorough, unconventional and innovative way. Even though Montessori education has been rooted worldwide for centuries, in Slovakia and the Czech Republic it presents relatively new alternative education, considering that an integrated school system, introduced in these countries in 1948 and lasting almost to the end of20thcentury, did not allow the use of other alternatives in addition to the mainstream education. A description of (preschool) education in both countries and an analysis of kindergarten teacher's personality and his/her lesson plans are included in the theoretical part of the paper. The empirical part contains pedagogical research of qualitative design, conducted in Slovakia and the Czech Republic in order to identify and map the current state, level and possibilities of formal education of pre-service and in-service teachers in Slovak and Czech kindergartens.

Language: English

DOI: 10.5937/IstrPed2101137S

ISSN: 2217-7337, 2406-2006

Doctoral Dissertation

A Phenomenology of Educational Care: Early Adolescent Descriptions

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

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Abstract/Notes: School design and operation are, at times, counter-productive to cultivating academic and personal success in all students. Teachers often lack adequate preparation time, and are pressed by class size and regulatory mandates. Thus, there is seemingly little time to focus on cultivating affective well-being or a supportive educational climate. This lack of support is linked to high drop-out rates, large numbers of academically unsuccessful students, and the disenfranchisement of many minority and English Language learners in our school system. The phenomenon of care, particularly as it relates to education, has been studied only briefly. Few comprehensive, qualitative descriptions regarding how students conceptualize care exist despite significant evidence that when students perceive teachers and schools as caring, they have higher and more sustainable levels of academic motivation. This research project endeavored to give children a voice regarding educational care through a qualitative study on the phenomenon of care from an adolescent perspective. The study employed multiple data collection methods including: interviews, art, and student writing with students ages 11-14 from two school environments. Data collected were analyzed using the vanKamm phenomenological method of analysis. Results indicated that the phenomenon of educational care was a complex set of actions and behaviors from the student vantage point. Five themes emerged including: (1) Relationships are a critical aspect of educational care, (2) Rules in educational settings should be simple and consistent within classrooms and institutions, (3) Students perceive some control of their learning environments as caring, (4) Educational environments and teacher behavior are both critical to care, (5) Basic safety and concern for physical space are necessary for educational care. Each theme is independently necessary but not sufficient when observed alone in educational contexts. Together these themes support Nel Noddings' ideal version of ethical caring, in that they involve motivated behaviors, reciprocal action, receptivity on the part of the students, and a sense of obligation to care in a manner above and beyond noticing the basic well being of the student. The themes indicated by the data demonstrated a multifaceted view of educational care previously undiscovered and provide useful fodder for educators to consider.

Language: English

Published: St. Louis, Missouri, 2010

Article

The Concept of Cosmic Education in Montessori Education [part 2]

Publication: Montessori Kyōiku [Montessori Education], no. 15

Pages: 14-21

Cosmic education, Montessori method of education

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Language: Japanese

ISSN: 0913-4220

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

Effects of Peace Education and Grace and Courtesy Education on Social Problem-Solving Skills and Social Awareness

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research, Grace and courtesy, Montessori method of education, Peace education

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Abstract/Notes: This action research studied the impact of peace education and portions of the Positive Discipline curriculum in a three-six primary Montessori classroom. During five weeks of implementing the research, sixteen students participated in class meetings for twenty minutes a day. The peace table activities and wheel of choice lessons were conducted individually and as a whole class. The peace table activities included a set of mini dishes on a tray, a rain stick, and a peace rose. The wheel of choice consisted of pictures and words of examples of what students could choose to help them solve problems. A few examples are count to ten, apologize, ask for help, and write your name on the agenda. Implementing the presentations into the classroom environment became a work for the students to use if needed and did not occur daily. As a work choice, the previous activities were available on tables and children were allowed to choose the work as many times as they felt was necessary. The research began with baseline data collection through SWIS (School Wide Information System) referral records, student interviews, and student surveys. Sources of data obtained during the study included interviews, surveys, observation tally sheets, and a field journal. The results presented an increase in social awareness and problem-solving skills through the class meetings. Students began acknowledging problems and brainstorming solutions. Class meetings will continue daily to extend the positive problem-solving capabilities and mindfulness students developed in their classroom community.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2016

Article

Basic Education and the Montessori Method [Gandhi's Wardha Scheme of Basic Education]

Publication: The Montessori Magazine: A Quarterly Journal for Teachers, Parents and Social Workers (India), vol. 1, no. 2/3

Pages: 44-49

Comparative education, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Wardha scheme of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc.

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Language: English

Article

The Significance of 'Play' and 'Work' in the Infant Education: Through the Comparison of F. Fröbel with M. Montessori

Available from: J-Stage

Publication: Studies in the History of Education, vol. 17

Pages: 67-83

Comparative education, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Friedrich Fröbel - Philosophy, Kindergarten (Froebel system of education) - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Maria Montessori - Philosophy, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc.

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Language: Japanese

DOI: 10.15062/kyouikushigaku.17.0_67

ISSN: 2189-4485, 0386-8982

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

History of the Reception of Montessori Education in Japan

Available from: Espacio, Tiempo y Educación

Publication: Espacio, Tiempo y Educación, vol. 5, no. 2

Asia, East Asia, Japan, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Montessori method of education - History

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Abstract/Notes: This paper focuses on the history of the reception of Montessori Education, and sheds light on the development of childhood education in Japan. From its first adoption in the 1910s until today, the Montessori style of Education has been both praised and criticised. Nevertheless, this period has seen three distinct phases of theory and practice. The first stage (1910s-1930s) saw, from its initial adoption, a rapid acceptance of Montessori Education, due to its promise of early education and new teaching methods promoting freedom for children. However, the method soon lost popularity because some educators criticized the weakness of Montessori’s theory. In the second stage (1930s-post-World War II), interest in the method continued to grow, albeit gradually, and several books published on the Montessori Method in Europe and America were translated into Japanese. The third stage (1950s-present) saw the so-called «Montessori revival», in which the method caught on again with many educators. Many original works were translated, numerous studies on Montessori appeared, and the number of kindergartens and nursery schools using the Montessori Method increased. Much has been said both for and against Montessori’s concept of «freedom for children». Recently, however «learning from the environment» has become an important topic in early childhood education in Japan. Montessori attaches importance to children’s freedom to interact with each other and their environment, leading to a renewed interest in the Montessori method and the theory behind it. This paper seeks to clarify the transitions in the popularity of Montessori Education and analyse its value to Japan.

Language: English

DOI: 10.14516/ete.227

ISSN: 2340-7263

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