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54 results

Article

International Links [NAMTA Centenary Exhibit; Tibetan Children's Village; Montessori Europe Congress, 2006; Rome Centenary Congress]

Publication: Montessori International, no. 80

Pages: 52

Asia, Displaced communities, India, Refugees, South Asia, Tibet

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Language: English

ISSN: 1470-8647

Article

Per un patto di unione europea

Publication: Rassegna di cultura e vita scolastica (Ministero Pubblica Istruzione)

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Language: Italian

ISSN: 0033-9482

Article

Ōbei de no montessōri kyōiku / 欧米でのモンテッソーリ教育 [Montessori Education in Europe and the United States]

Publication: Montessori Kyōiku / モンテッソーリ教育 [Montessori Education], no. 8

Pages: 57-70

Asia, East Asia, Japan

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Language: Japanese

ISSN: 0913-4220

Article

Montessori... 'The Most Interesting Woman in Europe': An Educational Revolution; A Social Movement

Available from: University of Connecticut Libraries - American Montessori Society Records

Publication: The Constructive Triangle (1965-1973), vol. 6, no. 2

Pages: 13-26

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Language: English

ISSN: 0010-700X

Article

Missions to Europe [Croatia, Romania, Lithuania]

Available from: University of Connecticut Libraries - American Montessori Society Records

Publication: Public School Montessorian, vol. 8, no. 4

Pages: 10

Croatia, Eastern Europe, Europe, Lithuania, Northern Europe, Public Montessori, Romania, Southern Europe

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Language: English

ISSN: 1071-6246

Article

International Notes [Europe, Russia, China, India, New Zealand, Central/South America]

Available from: University of Connecticut Libraries - American Montessori Society Records

Publication: Public School Montessorian, vol. 20, no. 3

Pages: 11

Americas, Asia, Australasia, Australia and New Zealand, Central America, China, East Asia, Eastern Europe, Europe, India, Latin America and the Caribbean, Montessori movement

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Language: English

ISSN: 1071-6246

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Three Approaches from Europe: Waldorf, Montessori, and Reggio Emilia

Available from: ECRP Website

Publication: Early Childhood Research and Practice, vol. 4, no. 1

Pages: 1-14

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Abstract/Notes: Waldorf, Montessori, and Reggio Emilia are three progressive approaches to early childhood education that appear to be growing in influence in North America and to have many points in common. This article provides a brief comparative introduction and highlights several key areas of similarity and contrast. All three approaches represent an explicit idealism and turn away from war and violence toward peace and reconstruction. They are built on coherent visions of how to improve human society by helping children realize their full potential as intelligent, creative, whole persons. In each approach, children are viewed as active authors of their own development, strongly influenced by natural, dynamic, self-righting forces within themselves, opening the way toward growth and learning. Teachers depend for their work with children on carefully prepared, aesthetically pleasing environments that serve as a pedagogical tool and provide strong messages about the curriculum and about respect for children. Partnering with parents is highly valued in all three approaches, and children are evaluated by means other than traditional tests and grades. However, there are also many areas of difference, some at the level of principle and others at the level of strategy. Underlying the three approaches are variant views of the nature of young children's needs, interests, and modes of learning that lead to contrasts in the ways that teachers interact with children in the classroom, frame and structure learning experiences for children, and follow the children through observation/documentation. The article ends with discussion of the methods that researchers apply to analyze the strengths and weaknesses of each approach.

Language: English

ISSN: 1524-5039

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

La Perspective Montessorienne Face au Mouvement de l’Éducation Nouvelle dans la Francophonie Européenne du Début du XXe Siècle [The Montessori Perspective in the Face of the New Education Movement in the Francophone Europe at the Start of the 20th Century]

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: European Review of History [Revue Européene d'Histoire], vol. 27, no. 5

Pages: 651-682

New Education Fellowship, New Education Movement, Theosophical Society, Theosophy

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Abstract/Notes: La méthode de Maria Montessori est née en pleine expansion du mouvement de l’Éducation nouvelle. Bien qu’on la considère généralement comme l’une des figures-clé de ce courant pédagogique, elle s’en considère plutôt la précurseure. Certes Montessori utilise constamment la dialectique de l’éducation « ancienne » et « nouvelle » dans ses écrits et elle a des points communs avec ce mouvement, expliquant ainsi des épisodes ponctuels de collaboration avec les entités qui le représentent ; mais elle s’éloigne aussi à maintes reprises des positions mises de l’avant par les pédagogues qui en font partie. Pour saisir la relation entre notre auteure et ce mouvement, on doit prendre en compte ses origines et ses fondements. À maintes reprises, Montessori contestera radicalement des principes de Rousseau et tente, en vain, de faire valoir sa vision, à travers ses collaborations avec les organismes représentant le mouvement de l’Éducation nouvelle. Évidemment l’opposition frontale d’une femme au héros incontesté du mouvement qu’elle critiquait ne pouvait qu’exaspérer ses contemporains. Qu’une simple « praticienne » de l’éducation s’érige en rivale de Rousseau était d’une arrogance impardonnable, puisqu’elle se positionnait ainsi en rapport de supériorité vis-à-vis tous les disciples du maître. C’était d’autant plus difficile à accepter qu’elle ne semblait pas prête à faire quelque concession que ce soit, résistant à se faire assimiler au mouvement et préférant avoir ses propres revues, ses propres congrès et sa propre association. La façon de concevoir les notions de liberté, discipline, effort, fantaisie et imagination, ainsi que l’approche de l’enseignement religieux et de la lecture et écriture, furent notamment au centre des divergences entre la pédagogie montessorienne et le mouvement de l’Éducation nouvelle. Bien que ces divergences mettent en évidence la différence entre l’héritage philosophique de chacun de ces courants, une recherche plus approfondie s’impose sur chacun de ces sujets.

Language: French

DOI: 10.1080/13507486.2020.1765150

ISSN: 1350-7486

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Women’s Role in Early Childhood Education in Europe

Available from: Springer Link

Publication: International Journal of Early Childhood, vol. 25, no. 1

Pages: 67-75

Europe, Feminism

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Abstract/Notes: The history of education is mainly a history of male educators and their ideas and systems of education, whereas the history of early childhood education is to a large extent a field of history where women have been the actors and to some extent also the writers about early childhood education. But this history is coloured by the withdrawn and to a large degree subordinate status of women, which is also reflected in the way history is written: A history of invisibility and anonymity, which also may have affected the place early childhood education has had in general educational history...

Language: English

DOI: 10.1007/BF03174635

ISSN: 0020-7187, 1878-4658

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

The European Roots of Early Childhood Education in North America

Available from: Springer Link

Publication: International Journal of Early Childhood, vol. 18, no. 1

Pages: 6-21

Americas, Canada, Kindergarten (Froebel system of education) - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., North America

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Abstract/Notes: Early childhood education in North America is currently in a state of flux. While Piagetian approaches to early childhood education curricula seem to predominate in North America today, some of the influences of the other paradigms discussed below are still in evidence. The idea of nurturing children as well as educating them has endured, even with the new cognitive focus. The concept of curricula appropriate to a child’s developmental level, first introduced by Froebel, has remained an important idea. The Montessori method has enjoyed a renaissance in North America, and specially designed curricula for the disabled has been re-established as the norm, after Itard’s and Seguin’s pioneering examples. Yet, new issues in early childhood education have arisen in North America. There is a great debate on the effects of day care, the changing family, the possibility of “hurried children”, and the role of state support in a “universal” child care system. The recent Report of the task force on child care in Canada reviewed many of these issues, and used data on child care arrangements in a number of European countries compared to canada and the United States in much of its discussion. It is not surprising, given the history of models of child care which have come from Europe to North America, that North Americans are once again looking across the Atlantic for fresh ideas.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1007/BF03176578

ISSN: 0020-7187, 1878-4658

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