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Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

Montessori - What Is It All About?

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

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Abstract/Notes: This research analyzes parents’ knowledge and perceptions of Montessori education in a dual track school. The school has three Montessori classrooms and nineteen traditional classrooms. Through surveys, the researcher gathered data on parents’ current perceptions. She then implemented Montessori educational workshops on core Montessori principles. The researcher also conducted five interviews to learn more about the various perceptions in the school. Finally, through a final survey the researcher was able gather data to show if using parent workshops changed parents’ perceptions on Montessori and offered more in-depth knowledge. The researcher found that a large majority of parents were on board with Montessori even though they had misunderstandings of different aspects of the method. Parents found the workshops helpful and were interested in going to more workshops. Based on the results gathered, the researcher found the need to do more parent education workshops in the next year.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2014

Article

Understanding the Youngest Children: How to Build a Deep Awareness of the Toddler with Parents and Caregivers

Available from: ERIC

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 40, no. 2

Pages: 83-89

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Abstract/Notes: Nichole Holtvluwer writes for fellow guides who work in the toddler community. Recognizing that communication with parents is the most important path to serving the child, Holtvluwer offers concrete advice beginning with the guide's most important stance: withholding judgment. She details four steps to working with parents or caregivers: building a relationship, providing knowledge, encouraging confidence, and finding excitement and joy. She concludes by suggesting that Montessori theory and parent education can be embedded into the issues that parents want to discuss, such as toileting. [This talk was presented at the NAMTA conference titled "The Social Relevance of the Montessori First Plane: Engaging Families, Building Partnerships, and Finding Common Ground with the Wider Early Childhood Community" in Dallas, TX, January 15-18, 2015.]

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

A Montessori Manual for Parents of Preschoolers – Part 1

Available from: University of Connecticut Libraries - American Montessori Society Records

Publication: The Constructive Triangle (1974-1989), vol. 6, no. 1

Pages: 23–38

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Abstract/Notes: A Montessori Manual for Parents of Preschoolers (Part 1 of 2)

Language: English

ISSN: 0010-700X

Conference Paper

Is There a Need for Handicraft in Preschool? Attitudes of Preschool Teachers and Parents on Including Handicraft Activities in the Regular Preschool Program

Available from: IATED Digital Library

INTED2020 14th International Technology, Education and Development Conference

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Abstract/Notes: Alternative educational concepts evolved in response to classical educational methods in which children are placed in a passive position and the transfer of knowledge is cultivated as a form of teaching. Models of alternative pedagogy (Montessori, Waldorf, Reggio, Agazzi) advocate developmentally appropriate practices which Bredekamp (1993) describes as a presence of different strategies, i.e., child-oriented behaviours of teachers and responding to the child's individual needs. In order to help each child to grow into a universal and competent individual from preschool age, it is necessary to encourage their imagination and creativity, as well as to acquire habits of cooperation and coexistence with other children. One of the activities which promote these desirable characteristics in children is handicraft. Many studies and findings in the area of neuroscience, multiple intelligences theories, and the aforementioned alternative pedagogical concepts emphasize the importance of handicraft and point out its benefits not only for children but for the entire community. However, such an approach to children's learning and activity is poorly represented in educational institutions. Therefore, the aim of the study was to examine the views of preschool teachers and parents on handicraft activities and its more frequent use in regular preschool programs. The survey was conducted by an anonymous questionnaire on a sample of 316 respondents, preschool teachers (N=141) and parents (N=175). The results of the study show that both preschool teachers and parents agree that certain elements of alternative concepts such as handicraft have a positive impact on the overall development of the child and that they are useful and practical life skills. They also agree that handicraft activities should be used in educational institutions to a greater extent. [Conference Name: 14th International Technology, Education and Development Conference; ISBN: 9788409179398; Place: Valencia, Spain]

Language: English

Published: Valencia, Spain: International Academy of Technology, Education and Development (IATED), 2020

Pages: 1511-1519

DOI: 10.21125/inted.2020.0499

ISBN: 978-84-09-17939-8

Article

Today's Grandparents

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 28, no. 4

Pages: 64

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Grandparents can be patient, can look at difficult behavior and avoid the leap to dark conclusions, and can deal with whining, crying, silliness, and a variety of other actions with calm but clear messages because they remember and understand the normalcy of most youthful behaviors.Worthiness eschews comparisons, values competence, avoids shame and blame, seeks understanding, and focuses not on what should not have been done but rather on what "needs to be understood" (Growing Parent, 1979).[...]these grandparents are in a minority, as current demographics suggest: * 72% think being a grandparent is the single most important and satisfying thing in their life. * 63% say they can do a better job caring for grandchildren than they did with their own. * 68% think being a grandparent brings them closer to their adult children. * 90% enjoy talking about their grandkids to just about everyone. (www.grandparents.com) It appears that Mario Montessori, Jr., had a grandmother who reflected these attitudes-Maria Montessori.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Master's Thesis

Practical Partnership: An Interactive Montessori Elementary Handbook for Teachers and Parents

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

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Abstract/Notes: Parent-teacher partnership could dramatically improve educational outcomes for students (Bikmaz & Guler, 2003; Epstein, 2001). However, most teachers and parents lack knowledge and resources for creating this relationship (Christenson, 2004; Epstein, 2001; Henderson & Mapp, 2002). The interactive handbook is a tool for Montessori elementary educators and parents that addresses the common barriers to connection and develops a partnership to provide a continuation of lessons and values from the classroom to the home. The implementation is focused on the Montessori elementary context as it correlates to the "cosmic education" philosophy. Current parents and teachers in the public and private sector of Montessori elementary education evaluated the handbook, and their feedback was incorporated to be the most relevant and effective tool possible.

Language: English

Published: Moraga, California, 2011

Article

Self-Perceptions on Digital Competences for M-Learning and Education Sustainability: A Study with Teachers from Different Countries

Available from: Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute (MDPI)

Publication: Sustainability, vol. 13, no. 1

Pages: 343

Perceptions, Sustainability

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Abstract/Notes: The current international landscape shows that the most common alternative for the continuity of formative learning processes during the coronavirus pandemic has been the use the of e-learning to support children’s learning in environments outside of school. This forced change in teaching methods has consolidated the recognition that the digital skills of teachers are a relevant factor for the sustainability of education, both during the pandemic and in a future post-pandemic period or in other emergencies. In this sense, the objective of this study carried out between May and September 2020 was to determine the perceptions of 427 teachers from 15 countries about their digital competences in working with m-learning in primary education using a Montessori approach. The results of the questionnaire showed that teachers perceive their digital competences as inert and not very effective for innovation compared with the subsistence of traditional pedagogical practices, to deal with unpredictable situations or to generate differentiated adaptations for an inclusive education. The results of this study also serve as empirical support for establishing four training dimensions that can be considered priorities for the construction and implementation of a teacher training model that contributes to the sustainable development of education.

Language: English

DOI: 10.3390/su13010343

ISSN: 2071-1050

Doctoral Dissertation

Examining Elementary Teachers' Perceptions of the Impact of High-Stakes Testing on Classroom Teaching Practices: A Mixed Methods Study

Available from: UAB Libraries

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Abstract/Notes: The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB) requires schools to be held accountable for academic performance. It is believed the pressure of accountability will lead teachers to narrow the curriculum by engaging students in test preparation activities. The purpose of this two-phase, explanatory mixed methods study was to examine elementary teachers’ perceptions of the impact of the Stanford Achievement Test 10 (SAT-10) and the Alabama Reading and Math Test (ARMT) on classroom teaching practices from a sample of third-grade, fourth-grade, and fifth-grade teachers in three large school systems in Alabama. The purpose of the first, quantitative phase of the study, was to reveal teachers’ perceptions of the impact of high-stakes testing on curriculum and instructional approaches, the amount of time spent on critical thinking skills, the amount of time spent on test preparation activities, and the perceived impact of state tests on students and teachers by surveying 123 third-grade through fifth-grade teachers in three large Alabama school systems. In the second, qualitative phase of this study, purposeful sampling strategy and maximal variation sampling strategy were employed to interview nine teachers who responded to the survey in the first, quantitative phase of the study to explore the results from the statistical tests in more depth. Findings suggested urban teachers spent more time on critical-thinking skills than rural and suburban teachers, and low-socioeconomic, rural teachers experienced more stress caused by high-stakes testing than their geographical counterparts. All teachers independent of socioeconomic status or school geographical location reported they increased their focus on reading and math, which were the subjects assessed on high-stakes tests and de-emphasized subjects not tested such as social studies and science. Finally, most teachers reported they decreased the teaching of critical thinking skills due to the SAT-10 but increased the teaching of critical thinking skills due to the ARMT. Due to the lack of research regarding high-stakes testing in Alabama elementary schools, there was a need for teachers to discuss the specific impact of testing on classroom teaching practices because they work directly with students and are cognizant of the challenges that teachers face.

Language: English

Published: Birmingham, Alabama, 2010

Article

Music Education in Montessori Schools: An Exploratory Study of School Directors’ Perceptions in the United States

Available from: SAGE Journals

Publication: International Journal of Music Education, vol. 35, no. 2

Pages: 227-238

Americas, North America, Perceptions, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: This exploratory study examined the changing role of music education and the availability of musical experiences for students attending Montessori schools in the Midwestern United States. On a survey instrument designed by the researcher, Montessori school directors (N = 36) from eight states shared descriptions of the current role of music at their schools, the challenges faced when teaching music, individual perceptions of the impact of music on development, and beliefs about music as a valuable component of the curriculum. Data included responses to Likert-scale items and open-ended questions in an online survey. Analyses revealed that while school directors believed music could be used to engage students in learning or to build upon issues of multicultural understanding, opportunities for musical engagement were limited as a result of stringent budget cuts or time restrictions in the classroom. Implications are discussed in terms of including music in the Montessori classroom in ways that align with Maria Montessori’s pedagogies situated within an international context.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1177/0255761416659508

ISSN: 0255-7614, 1744-795X

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

Effects of Classroom Talk Lessons on Student Perceptions of Collaborative Group Work in a Remote, Synchronous Montessori Elementary Learning Environment

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research, COVID-19 Pandemic, Lower elementary, Online learning

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Abstract/Notes: This mixed-methods action research examined the effects of classroom talk lessons on children’s perceptions of collaborative group work in an online Montessori learning environment during the COVID-19 pandemic. Participants were 19 Lower Elementary students and one teacher/investigator. All work was online, both synchronous and asynchronous. Students were presented with lessons in classroom talk, and practiced these skills during online collaboration in the creation of a student newsletter. Key findings were that students use of classroom talk behaviors and rigorous thinking increased slightly over the four-week period and students’ perceptions of their community identity and the value of their ideas increased over the course of the intervention, most notably in younger students. Teaching classroom talk had positive effects on student agency, depth of collaborative work, and grace and courtesy in this digital Montessori classroom. Respectful disagreement was identified as an area for future study.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2021

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