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986 results

Article

Baseline Data: Two National Surveys of Public Montessori Schools

Available from: ERIC

Publication: MPSC Update [Montessori Public School Consortium (Cleveland, OH)], vol. 1, no. 1

Pages: 10

Americas, Montessori schools, North America, Public Montessori, United States of America

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Language: English

Report

Reading and Math Achievement for African American Lower Elementary Students in Public Montessori Programs

Available from: National Center for Montessori in the Public Sector (NCMPS)

Academic achievement, African American community, African Americans, Americas, Arithmetic - Achievement, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Lower elementary, Mathematics - Achievement, Montessori method of education, North America, Public Montessori

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Abstract/Notes: As Montessori programs in public schools expand, Montessori education is becoming available to a more diverse population of American students than ever before. Students of color have a significant presence in public Montessori schools; over a quarter of students in whole-school public Montessori programs are African American. As these programs grow, researchers have increasingly directed their attention to demonstrating that Montessori works in public schools; however, few studies have examined outcomes for African American students at the lower elementary level, when critical reading and math skills are being established. This study sought to answer the question, how effectively does Montessori instruction promote achievement for African American third grade students in reading and math, compared to similar traditional schools and other public school choice programs?

Language: English

Published: Washington, D.C., 2016

Master's Thesis

Impact of Social Emotional Learning in an Urban Public Montessori School

Available from: MINDS@UW River Falls

Americas, Montessori method of education, North America, Public Montessori, Social emotional learning, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this study is to discover the impact a social-emotional learning program may have on an Upper Elementary Montessori Classroom. The study was motivated by the researcher’s experience of seeing the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic, online schooling and of local community unrest on the students. The design included first asking participants to take a survey for the purpose of obtaining baseline data on their emotion management and problemsolving skills. Next, the researcher implemented eight weeks of a social emotional established curriculum called, Second Step in an Upper Elementary Montessori classroom. Throughout the study, the researcher collected data on students’ struggles with solving problems independently with a basic quantitative instrument and using a qualitative narrative instrument. Finally at the close of the eight-week study, the students took a post-survey to determine if the program had an impact on the students’ ability to problem solve and manage their emotions. However, due to limitations of the study, the researcher could not draw specific conclusions yet the study did yield other benefits.

Language: English

Published: River Falls, Wisconsin, 2022

Doctoral Dissertation

The Effects of Montessori Teacher Training on Classroom Teaching Skills: The Public Montessori Teachers' Perspective

Available from: ProQuest - Dissertations and Theses

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Abstract/Notes: This study compares the opinions of public school teachers of their classroom teaching skills due to participation in the Montessori model of teacher training and the traditional teacher education training programs. The data were collected through a survey of 223 public Montessori schools across the United States. The design used in this study is causal comparative to establish cause and effect. The independent variable is the participation in the Montessori Model of Teacher Training. The dependent variables are the opinions of public school teachers as perceived from participation in the Montessori Model of Teacher Training. Comparisons of teacher opinions were compiled from a survey to ascertain the impact of participation in the Montessori Model of Teacher Training. The population for this study included all teachers employed in the public Montessori schools. The sample included the entire population of teachers who participated in traditional teacher training to earn state licensure and in a Montessori teacher training program. A total of thirty-eight states were included in the survey. A total of 560 surveys were received from the population sample. The teachers surveyed included 81% females and 19% males. The years of teaching experience in public schools were 0–5 years 31%; 6–10 years 28%; 11–15 years 16%; and over 15 years 25%. The years of teaching experience in Montessori schools were 0–5 years 57 %; 6–10 years 23%; 11–15 years 11%; and over 15 years 9%. The basic conclusions from this study indicated that there are significant differences, p < .05, in the responses of teachers who participated in the Montessori model of teacher training and the traditional teacher training for preparation of classroom instruction. In 11 out of the 12 survey items, the diverse approach of teaching used in the Montessori model of teacher training was perceived to be superior to traditional teacher training. However, in one survey question, the traditional teacher training was viewed superior for preparation of teaching in a whole group setting. This study suggest that the responses of teachers strongly recommend the Montessori model of teacher training.

Language: English

Published: Orangeburg, South Carolina, 1997

Doctoral Dissertation (Ph.D.)

Diverse Parents, Desirable Schools: Public Montessori, Fit and Conflict in the Era of School Choice

Available from: ProQuest - Dissertations and Theses

African American community, African Americans, Americas, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Montessori schools, North America, Public Montessori, School choice, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: One of the fundamental social problems in America is how to create racially diverse schools. While policy makers are slow to fix underlying housing segregation or return to busing, creating racial diversity through school choice is widely popular across the political spectrum. How can school choice create more racial and socioeconomic diversity, instead of increasing segregation?

Language: English

Published: New Haven, Connecticut, 2016

Doctoral Dissertation

Pilgrims and Guides: A Phenomenological Study of Montessori Teachers Guiding and Being Guided by Children in Public Montessori Schools

Available from: University of Maryland Libraries

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Abstract/Notes: This study explores the experiences of public school Montessori teachers. Max van Manen’s methodology for hermeneutic phenomenological research provides a framework for the study, and the philosophical writings of Gadamer, Abram, and Levinas guide the textual interpretations. Voices of curriculum theorists, in conversation with Maria Montessori’s words, reveal possibilities for understanding the experiences of Montessori public school teachers in the context of contemporary curriculum discourse. Six public school Montessori teachers engage with the researcher in a series of open-ended conversations. These elementary school teachers work with majority minority student populations in three different urban school districts. They range in age from mid-30s to early 60s, and have between 5 and 33 years of teaching experience in public Montessori schools. Their conversations illuminate the experience of teaching in public Montessori schools in three main themes. The teachers tell of being transformed and drawn-in to a way of life as they take Montessori training. They speak of the goodness of work that calls children to concentrate their energies and grow into active, caring and responsible people. Finally, they reflect on boundaries of difference encountered in the hallways and meeting places of public schools, and the shadows cast by state tests. The study suggests a need for Montessori teachers in public schools to participate in open-hearted conversations with parents, non-Montessori educators and administrators about what they are trying to do in their classrooms. It also reveals that decisions made by school administrators have a powerful effect on the ability of Montessorians to create engaging, child-centered learning environments. Finally, the study suggests a need for teachers, administrators, teacher-educators, and policy makers to embrace the questions and possibilities for creative growth inherent in tensions between the conflicting paradigms of adult-driven technical/scientific educational schema and the Montessori developmentally-based teaching style.

Language: English

Published: College Park, Maryland, 2007

Doctoral Dissertation

Enacting Accountability in Innovative Schools: The Sensemaking Strategies of Public Montessori Principals

Available from: University of Virginia

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Language: English

Published: Charlottesville, Virginia, 2021

Article

The Hard Work of Public Montessori

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 28, no. 3

Pages: 34-43

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Abstract/Notes: [...]I want to encourage every Montessori educator, teacher educator, and administrator to make time for observations in a public or charter Montessori school program. [...]I think that a program should not be labeled a Reggio Emilia program unless there is full commitment to that program-well-prepared teachers, a serious atelier (the art and supplies room, often centrally located), true child choice, and fantastic Tuscan food for everyone in the school. [...]this format makes it impossible for most of the children to come up and do anything-it assumes the teacher will be "doing things" with whatever is being presented. [...]teachers must set policies about tattling, about asking for spelling help, and so on, and encourage children to use peers as much as possible.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Montessori in High Stakes Testing Environments: Three Public Montessori Teachers Tell Their Stories

Available from: MontessoriPublic

Publication: Montessori Public, vol. 2, no. 1

Pages: 10-11

Public Montessori

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Language: English

Article

An Excerpt from Diverse Families, Desirable Schools: Public Montessori in the Era of School Choice

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 31, no. 2

Pages: 55

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Abstract/Notes: In a Boston Globe Sunday Magazine feature, the school was described as a "a scrubbed oasis," in a neighborhood of vacant lots and empty buildings, overseen by Gadpaille, "an angel priestess in red oxfords and a blue smock." Though she started her teaching career at private, predominantly White Montessori schools, including Rambusch's Whitby School, and as the founding director of Lexington Montessori School, Gadpaille's Montessori Family Center was designed for Roxbury's working-class Black families, offering full-day year-round childcare with half of the children attending tuition free through Head Start funding. Gadpaille envisioned a community of 150 Black-owned homes centered around a Montessori school serving ages birth to 18, and she recruited famed architect R. Buckminster Fuller, noted for his space-age geodesic domes, who skipped part of his Harvard reunion to volunteer the design.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

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