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823 results

Article

The Influence of Preschool Teachers' Beliefs on Young Children's Conceptions of Reading and Writing

Available from: ScienceDirect

Publication: Early Childhood Research Quarterly, vol. 4, no. 1

Pages: 61-74

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Abstract/Notes: Examines the relationship between two preschool program directors' and teachers' beliefs, instructional decisions, and preschool children's conceptions of reading and writing. Results show that preschool children's conceptions of reading and writing reflected the practices of the two programs. (Author/BB) Directors of two preschool programs were interviewed regarding their orientations toward reading and writing instruction. Ten children from each program were interviewed regarding their conceptions of reading and writing. One school was found to have a “mastery of specific skills/text-based” orientation, and the other was found to have a “holistic/reader-based” orientation. A relationship was found between preschool program's orientations toward reading and writing instruction and children's ideas about reading and writing. The relationships between preschool practices and children's conceptions are examined. Implications for the influence of preschool teacher's beliefs and instructional decisions on children's conceptions of reading and writing are discussed.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1016/S0885-2006(89)90077-X

ISSN: 0885-2006, 1873-7706

Report

The Effects of Multiage Grouping on Achievement and Self-Concept

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Abstract/Notes: The effects of multi-age grouping on achievement and self-concept were studied. The achievement variables examined were reading and mathematics achievement as measured by the Stanford Achievement Tests. The Piers-Harris Children's Self-Concept Scale was used to measure self-concept. The groups studied consisted of single-age and multi-age classrooms of children in grades one through five. No significant differences were found between children in multi-age and single-age classrooms on any of the achievement measures. The multi-age classrooms had significantly higher mean scores on one of the six factors in the self-concept scale--happiness and satisfaction. The multi-age classrooms had slightly but consistently higher mean scores on the other five factor scores and on the total self-concept score but the differences were not significant. (Author)

Language: English

Published: Cortland, New York, Apr 1979

Conference Paper

Academic Achievement Outcomes: Montessori and Non-Montessori Public Elementary Students

Available from: Semantic Scholar

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Language: English

Article

What? No Grades? Understanding Academic Achievement in Montessori Classrooms

Publication: Tomorrow's Child, vol. 17, no. 1

Pages: 5–8, 23, 26–27

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Language: English

ISSN: 1071-6246

Report

Effects of Type of Preschool Experience and Socioeconomic Class on Academic Achievement Motivation. Final Report

Available from: ERIC

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Abstract/Notes: Four experiments were designed to identify socioeconomic differences in preschool locus of control, develop a measurement technique for differentiating between internal and external locus of control in preschoolers, and study the effect of four kinds of preschool programs on locus of control. During the first experiment, the Stephens-Delys Reinforcement Contingency Interview (SDRCI) was developed to assess internal locus of control development in preschoolers. When used with 24 4-year-olds in a Head Start program, the measure was found to have rater and retest reliability; the race of the interviewer did not significantly affect scores. The second experiment indicated that the performance of 32 preschool boys on a mirror-tracing task was positively related to internal locus of control as measured by the SDRCI. In the third study, investigators tested 55 Head Start preschoolers and 50 middle-class nursery school children with the SDRCI. Lower internal control scores were found for the Head Start children than for the middle-class nursery school group; no differences were found between black and white Head Start groups. A final study of 114 children found a nonsignificant tendency for Montessori preschool experience (and to a lesser extent, parent cooperative nursery school experience) to increase internal control, as measured by the SDRCI, more than Head Start or a more structured compensatory preschool program. (Author/BRT)

Language: English

Published: West Lafayette, Indiana, Aug 1973

A Comparison of Academic Achievement for Seventh Grade and Eighth Grade Students from Montessori and Non-Montessori School Programs

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Language: English

Published: Stephenville, Texas, 2011

Article

Montessori Preschool Elevates and Equalizes Child Outcomes: A Longitudinal Study

Available from: Frontiers in Psychology

Publication: Frontiers in Psychology, vol. 8

Pages: 1-19

Academic achievement, Americas, Cognitive development, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Longitudinal studies, Montessori method of education, North America, Philosophy of mind, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Quality preschool programs that develop the whole child through age-appropriate socioemotional and cognitive skill-building hold promise for significantly improving child outcomes. However, preschool programs tend to either be teacher-led and didactic, or else to lack academic content. One preschool model that involves both child-directed, freely chosen activity and academic content is Montessori. Here we report a longitudinal study that took advantage of randomized lottery-based admission to two public Montessori magnet schools in a high-poverty American city. The final sample included 141 children, 70 in Montessori and 71 in other schools, most of whom were tested 4 times over 3 years, from the first semester to the end of preschool (ages 3 to 6), on a variety of cognitive and socio-emotional measures. Montessori preschool elevated children's outcomes in several ways. Although not different at the first test point, over time the Montessori children fared better on measures of academic achievement, social understanding, and mastery orientation, and they also reported relatively more liking of scholastic tasks. They also scored higher on executive function when they were 4. In addition to elevating overall performance on these measures, Montessori preschool also equalized outcomes among subgroups that typically have unequal outcomes. First, the difference in academic achievement between lower income Montessori and higher income conventionally schooled children was smaller at each time point, and was not (statistically speaking) significantly different at the end of the study. Second, defying the typical finding that executive function predicts academic achievement, in Montessori classrooms children with lower executive function scored as well on academic achievement as those with higher executive function. This suggests that Montessori preschool has potential to elevate and equalize important outcomes, and a larger study of public Montessori preschools is warranted.

Language: English

DOI: 10.3389/fpsyg.2017.01783

ISSN: 1664-1078

Reading Achievement and Perceptions Regarding the Multi-age Classroom Environment

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Language: English

Article

Paired Repeated Reading: A Classroom Strategy for Developing Fluent Reading

Publication: The National Montessori Reporter

Pages: 3–5

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Language: English

Article

The Challenge of Teaching Elementary Reading

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 18, no. 1

Pages: 38-45

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: In this article, Aline Wolf discusses the challenges of teaching elementary reading at present time. She also raises her concern not only about the declining of reading skills, but also about the declining number of books that students actually read which creates a dilemma for teachers. She believes that the Montessori community must give priority to eliminating current deficiencies in reading. In brainstorming sessions, workshops, staff meetings, and professional Montessori consultations, she feels that Montessorians must grapple with these problems and decide on creative solutions consistent with Montessori traditions. One strategy she suggests is Elementary training courses, if they have not already done so, can adjust their curriculum to incorporate Montessori strategies for nonreaders at the elementary level. The very valuable exercise of word building can be upgraded for 6-and 7-year-olds. Phonetic readers can be found with higher interest content. The author argues that for developing readers educators should ask if the methods being used respect each child's individual interests. Does it meet his or her particular needs, whether for more help with phonograms or for a wider variety of challenging books? Does this new strategy lead each student to a love of reading? Does it weigh down the burgeoning reader with dubious tasks that usurp the time for actually reading books? In attempts to improve reading in elementary classes teachers should be certain that any procedures decided upon are in keeping with the cherished techniques that have distinguished Montessori education for over a century.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

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