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378 results

Article

Shared Reading: Critical to a Balanced Reading Program

Publication: The National Montessori Reporter, vol. 29, no. 3

Pages: 14–19

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Language: English

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

Read Like You are Talking to a Friend: The Effects of Using a Systematic Approach, Including Teacher Modeling, Repeated Reading, and Corrective Feedback on the Reading Fluency and Prosody of Students in a 6-9-year-old Public Montessori Classroom

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research, Lower elementary, Montessori method of education, Reading

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Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this study was to determine effective ways to improve fluency among lower elementary Montessori students. The study was comprised of 33 students ages 6-9 who attend public Montessori classrooms in North America. The field of research on reading fluency and comprehension was surveyed as a background to support this action research study, which utilized an experimental design, collecting quantitative data through student-generated artifacts. The researchers implemented a reading block into their Montessori classrooms. The large and small group lessons focused on modeled readings from the teacher, repeated readings, and corrective feedback. Data was collected at the beginning and end of the study. Data included words read correctly after three reads, comprehension and fluency scores, and two student selfevaluations rating their knowledge and feelings about reading. Students made progress in all areas measured, including fluency, comprehension, and feelings about reading. This research highlights the benefit of a designated daily reading block and explicit reading instruction, incorporating teacher modeling, repeated reading, and corrective feedback.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2018

Article

Reading and the Brain, Part 1: Developing the Reading Circuit

Available from: White Paper Press

Publication: Montessori White Papers, vol. 2

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Language: English

Article

Program Profiles [Clissold School, Chicago, Illinois; Bonneville Elementary School, Pocatello, Idaho; Reading Community School, Reading, Ohio]

Publication: Public School Montessorian, vol. 1, no. 2

Pages: 9

Public Montessori

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Language: English

ISSN: 1071-6246

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Developing Reading Automaticity and Fluency: Revisiting What Reading Teachers Know, Putting Confirmed Research into Current Practice

Available from: Scientific Research Publishing (SCIRP)

Publication: Creative Education, vol. 9, no. 6

Pages: 838-855

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Abstract/Notes: This article revisits research on reading automaticity and fluency with the goal of helping beginning reading teachers put confirmed research findings into current classroom practice. The article examines the concepts of automaticity and fluency, how both impact the development of skillful reading. The article reviews research on: a) reading strategies children use, and b) repeat reading teaching strategies to develop fluency. Case scenarios illustrate key findings. Based on the research and case scenarios, four conclusions are drawn: 1) The terms automaticity and fluency are often interchanged; the concepts are not the same; 2) Understanding the differences between automaticity and fluency can impact repeat reading teaching strategies; 3) There is an assumption that rapid word recognition is the same cognitive process as automatic word decoding; and 4) There are two pathways to fluent reading, rapid word recognition, and automatic decoding ability. The article presents a theoretical model which aligns with childhood learning theories, offering teachers a variation in repeat reading teaching strategies. Rather than repeating reading the same text, opportunities to read slightly different, decodable text improves decoding, builds fluency, and thus strengthens children’s reading comprehension of complex text.

Language: English

DOI: 10.4236/ce.2018.96062

ISSN: 2151-4755, 2151-4771

Report

A Voluntary Prekindergarten Language Development and Reading Program for the Entire Four-Year-Old Population of a City (An Investigation of Machine-Taught Reading) Final Report

Available from: ERIC

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Abstract/Notes: Four studies conducted by the Mount Vernon Public Schools over a period of five semesters involved machine-teaching reading to 240 disadvantaged prekindergarten children from the children's center and the child development center to prepare them for more successful kindergarten learning through academically-oriented readiness activities in an American Montessori classroom setting. The children's center subjects attended 1-hour sessions while the child development center subjects attended 3-hour sessions. Experimental groups from both centers used the Edison-Responsive-environment talking typewriter and the story-telling-automatic reading tutor machines with programs which utilized linguistic vowel-sounds methods. The control groups used the same machines but did not receive program training. Results showed superior performance by the program subjects, but there were no significant differences in the performance of program subjects using different teaching machines. The 1-hour session proved to be as effective as the 3-hour session. These results imply that greater consideration should be given to more economical program systems and that class time could be reduced by half without loss in learning.

Language: English

Published: Mount Vernon, New York, Feb 1968

Doctoral Dissertation (Ed.D.)

Does Parental Involvement Matter? A Comparison of the Effects of Two Different Types of Parental Involvement on Urban Elementary Students' Academic Performance

Available from: ProQuest - Dissertations and Theses

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Abstract/Notes: This mixed method study seeks to utilize a comparative analysis to explore the impacts of two types of parental involvement in urban elementary school students’ academic performance. Epstein’s (1995) widely cited typology describes six different types of parental involvement, and this typology serves as a framework for this study. More specifically, this study compares learning at home and collaborating with community, as parent involvement types, to student academic performance. The study utilizes descriptive statistics and correlational analyses to compare parent-reported student performance via a survey instrument and semi-structured focus group interviews to collect narrative data. Parental involvement has been vigorously studied over the last two decades, however, not much data appears to address how collaborating with the community, as a form of involvement, influences student performance and other studies provide an ambiguous picture for learning at home as another parenting type. Furthermore, there is evidence that direct-action parent organizing, as a parental involvement form of collaborating with the community, may impact educational outcomes and this study examines these research areas. After analyzing the data, the researcher did not find evidence of a significant relationship between learning at home and parent-reported student academic performance. However, the study did reveal a significant association between parents who were collaborating with the community and the parent-reported academic performance of their children. This moderate correlation from an often overlooked parenting type, collaborating with the community, may harbor rich findings within the literature and point to the need for greater scrutiny herein. In fact, this provides a warrant for additional research to explore the “efficacy” of collaborating with community as a type of parental involvement that significantly influences positive student academic performance.

Language: English

Published: Baltimore, Maryland, 2018

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

Developing Creative Thinking with Intentional Teaching Practices in Academic Subjects for Early Childhood Classrooms

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research, Montessori method of education

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Abstract/Notes: This action research was conducted in an early childhood Montessori Primary classroom using intentional teaching practices with core curriculum materials to engage students in creative thinking. In the form of questions or suggestions, an open-ended inquiry was given to the ten participants, aged three to six years old, as they worked with Montessori materials in academic areas, including science, math, and language. The research utilized mixed methods of collection in the forms of quantitative and qualitative data and demonstrated successful intervention with a steady increase in work times of the students. A longitudinal study would contribute to this theory and provide further information regarding the increase of student understanding through creative thinking endeavors. This study provided evidence that intentional teaching practices can engage children in creative thinking, problem-solving, and collaborative learning while extending working times with materials, which contribute to a deeper level of comprehension of the direct curricular aims.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2021

Doctoral Dissertation

L'impact de la pédagogie Montessori sur le développement cognitif, social et académique des enfants en maternelle [The impact of Montessori pedagogy on the cognitive, social and academic development of children in kindergarten]

Available from: HAL Theses - Online Theses

Academic achievement, Child development, Europe, France, Montessori method of education - Evaluation, Western Europe

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Abstract/Notes: La pédagogie Montessori est une méthode d’éducation qui a été mise au point au début du siècle dernier par Maria Montessori pour des enfants d’un quartier défavorisé de Rome en Italie. Depuis sa création, elle s’est développée à la marge de l’éducation nationale et se retrouve principalement dans des écoles privées. La pédagogie Montessori devient cependant de plus en plus populaire auprès des enseignants de l’école maternelle publique. Ce récent engouement apparaît fondé à la vue de plusieurs principes de cette méthode. En effet, elle promeut l’autonomie, l’auto-régulation, la coopération entre pairs d’âges variés et l’apprentissage à partir de matériels sensoriels et auto-correctifs. Ces caractéristiques sont plutôt en accord avec les connaissances scientifiques sur l’apprentissage et le développement de l’enfant. Cependant, à ce jour, les preuves expérimentales rigoureuses de son efficacité sont limitées. Dans cette thèse, nous avons mesuré les compétences langagières, mathématiques, exécutives et sociales d’enfants d’une école maternelle, repartis aléatoirement entre des classes appliquant la pédagogie Montessori ou une pédagogie conventionnelle. Nous avons suivi leurs progrès au cours des trois années de l’école maternelle (étude longitudinale) et avons comparé les performances des enfants en fin de Grande Section (étude transversale). Nous avons également élaboré une mesure pour évaluer objectivement la qualité d’implémentation de la pédagogie Montessori dans cette école, situé dans un quartier défavorisé. Nos résultats ne montrent pas de différences entre les groupes dans les domaines des mathématiques, des compétences exécutives et des compétences sociales. Cependant, les enfants issus des classes Montessori avaient de meilleures performances en lecture que les enfants issus des classes conventionnelles en fin de Grande Section. La pédagogie Montessori apparaît donc comme adaptée à l’apprentissage de la lecture chez le jeune enfant. [The Montessori method of education was created at the beginning of the last century by Maria Montessori to help children in a disadvantaged neighborhood of Rome in Italy. Although it is nowadays most commonly found in private schools, the Montessori method has gained popularity among teachers in public preschool and kindergarten in France and around the world. This popularity may appear legitimate with regards to the principles underlying the Montessori methods, which involve autonomy, self-regulation, cooperation between children from different age groups and learning with multi-sensorial and self-correcting materials. These characteristics are broadly in line with research on learning and development in young children. However, there is limited evidence for the effectiveness of the Montessori method in the scientific literature. In this thesis, we measured the linguistic, mathematical, executive and social skills of preschoolers and kindergarteners from a public school in which children were randomly assigned to classrooms in which the Montessori method was implemented or to classrooms in which a conventional teaching was used. We followed children from the first year of preschool to kindergarten (longitudinal study) and compared the performance of children at the end of kindergarten (cross-sectional study). We also developed a scale to evaluate the quality of implementation of the Montessori method in the school, located in a disadvantaged neighborhood. Our results do not show any difference between groups in terms of mathematical, executive and social skills. However, children from Montessori classrooms had better reading performance than children from conventional classrooms at the end of kindergarten. Therefore, the Montessori method appears to be well suited for developing reading skills of young children.]

Language: French

Published: Lyon, France, 2019

Article

Montessori Academic Progress: Redrawing the MAP

Available from: MontessoriPublic

Publication: Montessori Public, vol. 1, no. 1

Pages: 17

Public Montessori

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Language: English

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