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Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

Filling the Gap: Phonological Awareness Activities for a Montessori Kindergarten

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

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Abstract/Notes: This action research was conducted to determine if small group explicit phonological awareness (PA) instruction using materials from Early Reading Mastery (Klein, 2015) and Words Their Way (Bear et al., 2006) would increase students’ ability to segment phonemes (i.e., break words into sounds) and build three letter consonant-vowel-consonant (CVC) words. The research was completed in a full-day public suburban Montessori kindergarten. Data was collected using phonological awareness tests, a teacher adapted spelling test, tally sheet, and researcher’s log. Pre-test data was used to create homogenous small groups for the four-week intervention. Explicitly worded lessons taught PA and phonic skills using traditional and supplementary Montessori materials. Post-intervention data showed an increase in the number of students able to segment CVC words. Establishing a research-based structure of PA lessons and materials has strengthened the researcher’s ability to teach students the foundational PA skills necessary to begin their reading journey. Further research to determine if this instructional practice reduces reading difficulties could be studied.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2016

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

The Impact of Inferring Word Meaning: Context Clues

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

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Abstract/Notes: The intent of this action research project was to determine the impact of context clue strategies on the ability to infer meaning from context. The study was conducted in a public Montessori school with 13 students in the 3rd grade with varied ability levels. In order to gather pre-assessment data, children were assessed on their ability to derive meaning directly from clues they found in context. Various context clue strategies were presented and practiced. During this time, data was collected using observations, student journals, and conferring. After the research, children completed a post-assessment to track changes and improvement. The results of the data analysis showed an overall increase of 54% in the ability to derive meaning directly from clues in context. The results have shown that the strategies designed for this study have positively impacted the ability to infer meaning from context in 3rd grade students.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2013

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

The Effects of Self-Determination Theory on Montessori Kindergarten Student’s Math Knowledge and Attitudes

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research, Self-determination, Self-determination theory

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Abstract/Notes: This action research examined how fostering student autonomy, competence, and relatedness as described in Self-determination Theory (SDT) improved the Montessori kindergarten student’s motivation to choose work from the math curriculum? By increasing the kindergarten student’s knowledge of the Montessori math curriculum sequence, an attempt was made to increase their autonomy, competence and relatedness as it pertains to choosing math work. The data collection consisted of a student survey and questionaire that was administered before and after the introduction of the action research interventions. Teacher observations were also helpful when determining if students were choosing math works at a higher rate. This research found that introducing kindergarten students to the sequence of Montessori math work improved their knowledge of and attitude towards the Montessori math curiculum.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2013

Report

Montessori Pre-School Education: Final Report

Available from: ERIC

Academic achievement, Americas, Comparative education, Comparative Analysis, Early childhood education, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: In order to investigate the effectiveness of Montessori preschool education as compared with non-Montessori preschool education, Phase I of this study matched 2 groups, each of 21 preschool children, on intelligence quotient and certain socio-economic factors. One group attended a Montessori preschool and the other a non-Montessori preschool. The children were administered tests near the beginning and end of the preschool year to determine any differences in achievement due to the preschool training. In Phase II a trained researcher interviewed the primary grade teachers who by then had some of the preschool children of Phase I in their classrooms. Ratings of these teachers provided information on the personality and ability of 3 groups of children, (1) former Montessori preschool children, (2) former non-Montessori preschool children, and (3) non-preschool children. The children were rated on 8 major traits which contained 27 stimulus variables. Phase I data indicated that Montessori preschool children gained significantly more in verbal ability than non-Montessori preschool children. Phase II data indicated that Montessori children were superior to the children of the other 2 groups in reading readiness, interest in learning, independence, interpersonal relations, leadership, and learning ability. No differences were found in creativity or ability to adjust to the traditional-type school.

Language: English

Published: Washington, D.C., Jun 1967

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Leading Reflective Practices in Montessori Schools

Available from: University of Kansas Libraries

Publication: Journal of Montessori Research, vol. 7, no. 1

Pages: 51-65

Americas, Educational leadership, Montessori method of education, North America, Teachers, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: In this paper, we report the results of a qualitative study examining the development of leadership competencies as Montessori school leaders gain experience using a coaching protocol with their teachers. Extending previous work, the emphasis is on the school leaders’ specific roles as instructional supervisors leading reflective practices. National standards, both traditional and Montessori, are a foundation to investigate a group of Montessori school leaders’ development in reference to articulated competencies, specifically for the school leader to tend to their own learning and effectiveness through reflection, study, and improvement, and to empower teachers to the highest levels of professional practice and to continuous learning and improvement. After the use of a prescribed coaching protocol, 12 Montessori school leaders from 6 schools across the United States were interviewed using a set of semistructured questions. The study results support that reflective practices lead to both improvement of practice with this group of Montessori school leaders and their respective teachers. We conclude that self-reflection is critical to a Montessori leader’s success, empowering them to model and influence reflective practices, with direct impacts on teacher reflection and school improvement. This conclusion becomes relevant as we observe our Montessori school leaders assuming numerous and complicated administrative roles, from management and teacher evaluation to instructional supervision, mentoring, and coaching teachers.

Language: English

DOI: 10.17161/jomr.v7i1.14832

ISSN: 2378-3923

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Determining the Measurement Quality of a Montessori High School Teacher Evaluation Survey

Available from: University of Kansas Libraries

Publication: Journal of Montessori Research, vol. 3, no. 1

Pages: 30-44

Americas, Montessori method of education - Evaluation, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this study was to conduct a psychometric validation of a course evaluation instrument, known as a student evaluation of teaching (SET), implemented in a Montessori high school. The authors demonstrate to the Montessori community how to rigorously examine the measurement and assessment quality of instruments used within Montessori schools. The Montessori high school community needs an SET that has been rigorously examined for measurement issues. The examined SET was developed by a Montessori high school, and the sample data were collected from Montessori high school students. Using a Rasch partial credit model, the results of the analysis identified several measurement issues, including multidimensionality, misfit items, and inappropriate item difficulty levels. A revised version of the SET underwent the same analysis procedure, and the results indicated that measurement issues persisted. The authors suggest several ways to improve the overall measurement quality of the instrument while keeping the Montessori foundation. Additional validation studies with a revised version of the SET will be needed before the instrument can be endorsed for full implementation in a Montessori setting.

Language: English

DOI: 10.17161/jomr.v3i1.5871

ISSN: 2378-3923

Master's Thesis

A Comparison of Reading Attainment in Two First Grade Classes in a State and a Montessori School in Switzerland

Available from: Massey University - Theses and Dissertations

Comparative education, Europe, Montessori method of education, Switzerland, Western Europe

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Abstract/Notes: The main purpose of this study is to examine whether the age at which children start to learn to read affects their later progress - specifically, whether an earlier start at reading gives children an advantage when they enter first grade at the age of six years. The study was conducted in Zürich, Switzerland, and compared a first grade class in a local school with two first grade classes in a Montessori school. There were 42 participants aged between six and seven years, 22 girls and 20 boys. The children were given a series of alphabet knowledge, reading and phoneme tests at the beginning and end of the year to measure the reading progress of each group. It was found that although the Montessori children who had already attended the Montessori kindergarten had an advantage over the local children, this advantage was only significant for alphabet knowledge, and was not translated into a significant advantage in either phonemic awareness or reading ability. Reasons for this were considered including the relative efficiency with which children learned to read in German at the local school, possible failings in the Montessori instruction, and the fact that many of the local children had already learned to read at home before starting school something that may be related to the high socioeconomic status (SES) and home literacy environment (HLE) of both groups.

Language: English

Published: Palmerston North, New Zealand, 2015

Book

Rabindranath Tagore: Adventure of Ideas and Innovative Practices in Education

Available from: Springer Link

Asia, India, Rabindranath Tagore - Biographic sources, South Asia

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Abstract/Notes: Tagore started a school in 1901 and in 1918 he wrote, ‘…the Santiniketan School should form a link between India and the world…the epoch of narrow nationalism is coming to an end…. The first flag of victory of Universal Man shall be planted there’. This was the beginning of Visva-Bharati that finally encapsulated the school and university with its many programmes and courses under one unique integrated system. The university was a logical progression in his philosophy of education. The central idea of the university was for the east to offer to the west the best of its wealth and take from the west its knowledge. This was indeed a novel idea as the country was yet to have its own full-fledged universities. Tagore envisioned the university as the seat for research that would generate and also dispense knowledge. Tagore established the university in Santiniketan where he had founded his school. He wanted the university to offer education that was enmeshed with the Indian way of life so that knowledge grew out of the culture, society, history, literature, geography, economy, science and flora and fauna of the country. From this sense of nationalism, we see Tagore evolving into an internationalist based on equal terms of fellowship and amity between the east and the west. He shared his quest for such a centre of learning with the ideas of several noted international pedagogues. Tagore saw world problems and national interests as interrelated, and he felt that internationalism was the inner spirit of the modern age.

Language: English

Published: Cham, Switzerland: Springer International Publishing, 2014

ISBN: 978-3-319-00837-0

Series: SpringerBriefs in Education

Book

Moral Development in Montessori and Traditional Preschool Children: Does School Type Make a Difference?

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Abstract/Notes: This study investigates the moral development of thirty 5-year-old children in Montessori and traditional preschools. Data for the study were derived from five sources: an intelligence test; a perspective taking task; an altruism/helping task; an altruism/sharing task; and an interview for exploring moral reasoning. Two 30 to 45 minute sessions were used for data gathering. Comparisons were made between school type and across the total sample in regard to altruistic behavior, specifically helping and sharing; moral judgement, specifically positive justice reasoning; and cognitive perspective taking. Positive justice reasoning and altruistic behavior were not found to be affected by exposure to a Montessori or traditional school environment. Rather, results indicated that developmental influences alone determined reasoning and behavior, thus confirming developmental theories of moral growth, and suggesting as well that direct intervention or teaching may be more effective than environment in spurring moral growth.

Language: English

Published: [S.l.]: [s.n.], 1979

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Including Children with Mental Retardation in the Religious Community

Available from: SAGE Journals

Publication: Teaching Exceptional Children, vol. 33, no. 5

Pages: 52-58

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Abstract/Notes: This article describes practical strategies for promoting inclusion in religious programs. Strategies are provided for including children with mental disabilities, mild mental retardation, moderate mental retardation, and severe to profound mental retardation, and older students with mental retardation. Strategies are also provided for preparing peers and working with families.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1177/004005990103300508

ISSN: 0040-0599, 2163-5684

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