Quick Search
For faster results please use our Quick Search engine.

Advanced Search

Search across titles, abstracts, authors, and keywords.
Advanced Search Guide.

500 results

Article

The 11th All-India Montessori Teachers' Training Course...

Available from: ProQuest Historical Newspapers

Publication: Times of India (Mumbai, India)

Pages: 3

See More

Abstract/Notes: "The 11th All-India Montessori Teachers' Training Course was inaugurated on Friday at the Saraswati Bhawan, Gwalior, by Her Highness the Maharani of Gwalior."

Language: English

Article

Training of Teachers

Available from: ProQuest Historical Newspapers

Publication: Times of India (Mumbai, India)

Pages: 9

See More

Abstract/Notes: "The Bombay Government has approved a proposal to open a pre-primary teachers' training college for women in Sangli next June, it is learned. The college will be managed by the Bal Adhyapan Mandir of Sangli, which runs two Montessori schools. It will admit 50 students in the first years.

Language: English

Article

Basic Schools Must Improve: Training of Teachers Is Vital, Says Mr. Nehru

Available from: ProQuest Historical Newspapers

Publication: Times of India (Mumbai, India)

Pages: 7

See More

Abstract/Notes: "Mr. Darbarilal Sharma (U. P.) said that Congress leaders were not sincere about basic education. They sent their own children to Montessori or convent schools. If the leaders believed in the basic education system, they should first sent their children to basic schools he added."

Language: English

Article

Education, Instruction, & Tuition: The XXI Indian Montessori Training Course... [classified advertisement]

Available from: ProQuest Historical Newspapers

Publication: Times of India (Mumbai, India)

Pages: 2

See More

Abstract/Notes: "The XXI Indian Montessori Training Course will be held under the auspices of the Association Montessori Internationale and the Teachers' Training College, Banaras Hindu University by Mr. A. M. Joosten, Personal Representative of the late Dr. Maria Montessori from September, 1956 to middle March, 1957, at Banaras..."

Language: English

Article

Montessori Training

Available from: ProQuest Historical Newspapers

Publication: Times of India (Mumbai, India)

Pages: 4

See More

Abstract/Notes: "The 31st International Training Course for teachers is being held by the Association Montessori Internationale in London from January 19 to July 18, 1953..."

Language: English

Article

TEP Listings

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 32, no. 1

Pages: 54-55

⛔ No DOI found

See More

Abstract/Notes: Teacher education programs affiliated by the American Montessori Society provide comprehensive courses of study that prepare the adult learners of today to be the highly skilled, highly qualified Montessori teachers and leaders of tomorrow. ARIZONA ARIZONA MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM Early Childhood, Elementary I, Elementary I-II Chandler KHALSA MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM Early Childhood, Elementary I, Elementary II, Elementary I-II Tucson ARKANSAS ARKANSAS CENTER FOR MONTESSORI STUDIES Early Childhood, Elementary I, Elementary I-II Little Rock CALIFORNIA CAPITAL EDUCATION INSTITUTE Early Childhood Claremont COTTAGE MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM Early Childhood Fresno Additional Site: Lancaster EAST BAY MONTESSORI TRAINING Early Childhood Fremont FOUNTAINHEAD MONTESSORI ADULT EDUCATION Early Childhood Dublin MONTESSORI CENTER FOR TEACHER EDUCATION Early Childhood, Elementary I, Elementary II, Elementary I-II San Diego MONTESSORI HILLS ACADEMY TEACHER CERTIFICATION PROGRAM Early Childhood Chula Vista MONTESSORI INSTITUTE OF ADVANCED STUDIES Early Childhood Castro Valley MONTESSORI TEACHER ACADEMY Early Childhood Dana Point MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION CENTER/SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood, Elementary I, Elementary I-II San Leandro, San Mateo, Sunnyvale Additional Site: West Covina MONTESSORI TRAINING CENTER Early Childhood, Elementary I, Elementary I-II Shingle Springs UNIVERSITY MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM AT UC IRVINE Early Childhood Irvine COLORADO MONTESSORI EDUCATION CENTER OF THE ROCKIES Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood, Elementary I, Elementary I-II, Administrator Boulder DELAWARE DELAWARE INSTITUTE FOR MONTESSORI EDUCATION Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood, Elementary I, Elementary I-II Hockessin MONTESSORI INSTITUTE FOR TEACHER EDUCATION Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood Wilmington FLORIDA BARRY UNIVERSITY MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM Early Childhood, Elementary I-II Miami Shores DUHOVKA MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM Early Childhood, Elementary I-II Additional Site: Fernandina Beach MAITLAND MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM Early Childhood, Elementary I, Elementary I-II Maitland MONTESSORI ACADEMY TRAINING INSTITUTE Early Childhood Pembroke Pines MONTESSORI TEACHER TRAINING INSTITUTE/MTTI Early Childhood Palmetto Bay ORLANDO MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION INSTITUTE Early Childhood Celebration PALM HARBOR MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION CENTER Early Childhood Tarpon Springs SUMMIT MONTESSORI TEACHER TRAINING INSTITUTE Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood, Elementary I Davie GEORGIA MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION INSTITUTE-ATLANTA Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood Atlanta HAWAII CHAMINADE UNIVERSITY OF HONOLULU MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM Early Childhood Honolulu ILLINOIS MIDWEST MONTESSORI TEACHER TRAINING CENTER Early Childhood, Elementary I, Elementary I-II Evanston MONTESSORI HEARTLAND TEACHER EDUCATION CENTER Early Childhood Moline SETON MONTESSORI INSTITUTE Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood, Administrator Clarendon Hills INDIANA MONTESSORI TEACHER ACADEMY AT EDISON LAKES Early Childhood Mishawaka KENTUCKY GREATER CINCINNATI CENTER FOR MONTESSORI EDUCATION Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood Covington MAINE MAINE MONTESSORI INSTITUTE Early Childhood Falmouth MARYLAND INSTITUTE FOR ADVANCED MONTESSORI STUDIES Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood, Elementary I, Elementary I-II, Administrator Silver Spring MARYLAND CENTER FOR MONTESSORI STUDIES Early Childhood Lutherville MONTGOMERY MONTESSORI INSTITUTE Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood Rockville MASSACHUSETTS CAMBRIDGE MONTESSORI INSTITUTE Infant & Toddler Cambridge MONTESSORI ELEMENTARY TEACHER TRAINING COLLABORATIVE Elementary I, Elementary II, Elementary I-II Lexington MONTESSORI INSTITUTE - NEW ENGLAND Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood Beverly NEW ENGLAND MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION CENTER Early Childhood Newton NORTHEAST MONTESSORI INSTITUTE Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood Wenham MICHIGAN ADRIAN DOMINICAN MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION INSTITUTE Early Childhood Adrian MICHIGAN MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION CENTER Early Childhood, Elementary I, Elementary I-II, Elementary II Waterford MINNESOTA VIRGINIA MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION CENTER Early Childhood Additional Site: Excelsior MISSOURI HOPE MONTESSORI EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTE Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood St. Louis MONTANA MONTANA MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION INSTITUTE Early Childhood Kalispell NEBRASKA MID-AMERICA MONTESSORI TEACHER TRAINING INSTITUTE Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood, Elementary I, Elementary I-II Omaha NEVADA MONTESSORI TRAINING OF SOUTHERN NEVADA Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood, Elementary I, Elementary I-II Las Vegas NEW JERSEY MONTESSORI CENTER FOR TEACHER DEVELOPMENT Early Childhood Morristown MONTESSORI TEACHER TRAINING INSTITUTE OF MERCER COUNTY COMMUNITY COLLEGE Early Childhood Robbinsville PRINCETON CENTER TEACHER EDUCATION Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood, Elementary I, Elementary I-II, Administrator Princeton WEST SIDE MONTESSORI SCHOOL TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM Infant & Toddler Additional Site: Whitehouse Station NEW YORK BUFFALO MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM Early Childhood Clarence CENTER FOR MONTESSORI EDUCATION I NEW YORK Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood, Administrator New Rochelle WEST SIDE MONTESSORI SCHOOL TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood, Elementary I, Elementary I-II, Administrator New York City NORTH CAROLINA CENTER FOR MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION/NORTH CAROLINA Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood, Elementary I, Elementary I-II Huntersville OHIO CINCINNATI MONTESSORI SECONDARY TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM Secondary I, Secondary I-II Cincinnati COLUMBUS MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood Columbus XAVIER UNIVERSITY MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM Early Childhood, Elementary I, Elementary I-II Cincinnati OKLAHOMA OKLAHOMA CITY UNIVERSITY MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM Early Childhood Oklahoma City OREGON MONTESSORI OF ALAMEDA TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood Portland PENNSYLVANIA CHESTNUT HILL COLLEGE MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM Early Childhood Philadelphia PUERTO RICO INSTITUTO NUEVA ESCUELA Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood, Elementary I, Elementary I-II, Secondary I Rio Piedras SOUTH CAROLINA GULF COAST MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION CENTER Elementary I, Elementary I-II Additional Site: Charleston HOUSTON MONTESSORI CENTER Secondary I-II, Administrator Additional Site: Charleston LANDER UNIVERSITY MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM Early Childhood, Elementary II, Elementary I-II Greenwood NORTHEAST MONTESSORI INSTITUTE Early Childhood Additional Site: Mt. Pleasant SEACOAST CENTER FOR EDUCATION Elementary I, Elementary I-II Charleston TENNESSEE MONTESSORI TRAINING CENTER OF BRENTWOOD Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood Brentwood TEXAS DALLAS MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM Early Childhood, Elementary I, Elementary I-II Plano GULF COAST MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION CENTER Elementary I, Elementary I-II Houston HOUSTON MONTESSORI CENTER Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood, Elementary I, Elementary II, Elementary I-II, Secondary I, Secondary I-II, Administrator Houston MONTESSORI DEVELOPMENT CENTER OF DFW Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood Irving MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION INSTITUTE-HOUSTON Early Childhood Houston NORTH TEXAS MONTESSORI INSTITUTE Early Childhood Frisco SHELTON MONTESSORI TRAINING Early Childhood, Elementary I, Elementary I-II Dallas UTAH INSTITUTE FOR MONTESSORI INNOVATION AT WESTMINSTER COLLEGE Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood, Elementary I, Elementary II, Elementary I-II, Administrator Salt Lake City VIRGINIA NORTHERN VIRGINIA MONTESSORI INSTITUTE Early Childhood Ashburn VIRGINIA CENTER FOR MONTESSORI STUDIES Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood Richmond VIRGINIA MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION CENTER Early Childhood Chesapeake WASHINGTON MONTESSORI CENTER FOR TEACHER EDUCATION-WASHINGTON STATE Early Childhood Bellevue MONTESSORI EDUCATION INSTITUTE OF THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood, Elementary I, Elementary I-II Bothell WISCONSIN UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN- RIVER FALLS MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM Early Childhood, Elementary I, Elementary I-II River Falls INTERNATIONAL BAISHAN MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION INSTITUTE Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood Qingdao, CHINA BEIJING HEART & MIND MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION CENTER Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood Beijing, CHINA Early Childhood Additional Site: Yiwu, CHINA CADALIN GLOBAL EDUCATION Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood Hsinchu City, TAIWAN CAPITAL COLLEGE Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood Richmond, BC, CANADA CAPITAL EDUCATION INSTITUTE Early Childhood Additional Site: Nanning, CHINA CENTRE FOR ADVANCED MONTESSORI STUDIES-VANCOUVER Elementary I, Elementary I-II Vancouver, BC, CANADA CENTRO DE ENSEÑANZA MONTESSORI, A.C. Early Childhood Tijuana, BC, MEXICO CENTRO DE ENTRENAMIENTO MONTESSORI Early Childhood, Elementary I, Elementary I-II Monterrey, NL, MEXICO THE CHILDREN'S HOUSE MONTESSORI EDUCATION CENTER Early Childhood Beijing, CHINA DR. JUN INSTITUTE OF MONTESSORI EDUCATION Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood Seoul, REPUBLIC OF KOREA DUHOVKA MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM Early Childhood, Elementary I, Elementary I-II Prague, CZECH REPUBLIC ETONKIDS MONTESSORI TEACHER TRAINING ACADEMY Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood Beijing, CHINA HOUSTON MONTESSORI CENTER Secondary I, Secondary I-II Additional Site: Prague, CZECH REPUBLIC INFINITY MONTESSORI ACADEMY OF HONG KONG Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, HONG KONG INTERNATIONAL MONTESSORI EDUCATION INSTITUTE Early Childhood, Elementary I, Elementary I-II Taichung City, TAIWAN INTERNATIONAL MONTESSORI TEACHING INSTITUTE Early Childhood Beijing, CHINA KOREAN INSTITUTE FOR MONTESSORI Early Childhood Seoul, REPUBLIC OF KOREA KOREAN MONTESSORI COLLEGE Early Childhood Seoul, REPUBLIC OF KOREA LMS MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM Early Childhood Windsor, ON, CANADA MONTESSORI INSTITUTE FOR TEACHER EDUCATION Early Childhood Additional Site: Istanbul, TURKEY MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION CENTER/SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA Infant & Toddler Additional Site: Taipei City, TAIWAN Early Childhood Additional Site: Kowloon Tong, HONG KONG NORTHEAST MONTESSORI INSTITUTE Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood Additional Site: Chengdu, CHINA OKLAHOMA CITY UNIVERSITY MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM Early Childhood Additional Site: Taipei City, TAIWAN PALM HARBOR MONTESSORI TEACHER EDUCATION CENTER Early Childhood Additional Site: Beijing, CHINA SHANGHAI MONTESSORI EDUCATION ACADEMY Infant & Toddler, Early Childhood, Administrator Shanghai, CHINA WEIMING MONTESSORI EDUCATION CENTRE Early Childhood Beijing, CHINA WEST SIDE MONTESSORI SCHOOL TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM Infant & Toddler Additional Site: Beijing, CHINA

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Doctoral Dissertation

Empathy, Social Problem-Solving, and the Social Behavior of Preschoolers

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

See More

Abstract/Notes: A social skills intervention was implemented at two suburban preschools. The purpose of the intervention was to develop subjects' empathic and social problem-solving skills to test whether this training would increase prosocial behavior in class. In addition, the study compared the effectiveness of two teaching methods in promoting cognitive and affective skills: training using role playing and discussion-based training. The subjects were 45 children of both sexes between the ages of four-and-one-half to five-and-one-half years. At each school, teachers led one of three training groups: empathy and problem-solving using role playing; the same training using discussion; home and outdoor safety training, which served as an attention-control group. Training sessions were conducted for 15 to 20 minutes, three times a week for six weeks. Pre- and post-intervention empathy, role-taking, problem-solving scores, observational behavior ratings, and teacher ratings using the Devereux scales were administered. Results of pre-testing revealed expected, significant associations between cognitive and affective skills and between these abilities and subjects' social behavior, with empathy showing the strongest associations. Responses to affective measures, however, did not prove to be consistent across emotions. Empathic and role-taking responses to anger and fear stimuli were unrelated to responses to happiness and sadness stimuli, yet were associated most strongly with observed and rated social behaviors. No significant differences in gain scores emerged across the three treatment groups on outcome measures, although gains in cognitive and affective skills correlated significantly with behavioral improvement. The most likely reasons for this lack of training effects across groups were: all children were from a higher SES background and displayed fewer behavioral problems than subjects used by many other studies in this area; children at one setting (a Montessori program) were much less receptive to a group social skills approach; the small sample size provided insufficient statistical power to assess small effects. Implications of the study's findings for future measurement and training of empathy and social problem-solving skills were discussed.

Language: English

Published: Ann Arbor, Michigan, 1983

Article

The Dilemma of Scripted Instruction: Comparing Teacher Autonomy, Fidelity, and Resistance in the Froebelian Kindergarten, Montessori, Direct Instruction, and Success for All

Available from: Teachers College Record

Publication: Teachers College Record, vol. 113, no. 3

Pages: 395-430

See More

Abstract/Notes: More than a century before modern controversies over scripted instruction, the Froebelian kindergarten--the original kindergarten method designed by Friedrich Froebel--and Maria Montessori's pedagogy were criticized for rigidly prescribing how teachers taught and children learned. Today, scripted methods such as Direct Instruction and Success for All are condemned for limiting teachers' autonomy and narrowing students' learning, especially that of students from low-income backgrounds, for and with whom scripts are often designed and used. Proponents of scripted instruction counter that it is helpful for teachers and effective with students. Comparing historical and modern scripts offers an opportunity to explore teachers' reactions to this hotly debated approach to school reform and to think about some possible implications for teacher education. I examine how teachers reacted to four different models of scripted instruction. I chose to compare the Froebelian kindergarten, Montessori, Direct Instruction, and Success for All because of their longevity, wide use, and the amount of information available about them. I focus on the scripts' theory and research base and teacher training, and on teachers' assessments of the scripts' effectiveness, and ask how these factors might influence teachers' autonomy, fidelity, and resistance when using scripts. Research Design: Using historical methods, I summarize the history of scripted instruction; selectively survey research on teacher autonomy, fidelity, and resistance; and interpret primary and secondary sources on the Froebelian kindergarten, Montessori, Direct Instruction, and Success for All. Teacher autonomy, fidelity, and resistance varied in these four scripts. Froebelian kindergarten and Montessori teachers autonomously chose to receive scripted, lengthy, intensive, pre-service training and professional development in closed professional learning communities. Direct Instruction and Success for All teachers receive scripted, relatively limited pre-service training and ongoing professional development in schools in which teachers often do not autonomously choose to teach. Despite the scripted training, most Froebelian kindergarten teachers, and many Montessori, Direct Instruction, and Success for All teachers modified these scripts at the classroom level; some Froebelian and Montessori teachers made very overt, substantial changes when the social class backgrounds of the students changed. Many Froebelian and most Montessori teachers seemed to believe that these scripts helped their students learn. Direct Instruction and Success for All teachers express more mixed views of these scripts' effectiveness. Some say that the scripts "work "for their students but that as teachers they feel constrained, a situation I see as a professional dilemma. Anecdotally, some new teachers with little pre-service training say that they feel limited by scripts but daunted by the task of creating curricula and instruction on their own. My research raises questions about teachers' reactions to scripts. The examples of Froebelian kindergarten, Montessori, Direct Instruction, and Success for All teachers I studied suggest that there may be unpredictable contradictions in scripted instruction. Scripted, autonomously chosen, intensive training may strengthen teacher fidelity and resistance, by giving teachers a deep repertoire of pedagogical skills that some continue to use and others use to autonomously modify scripts in response to students' perceived needs. Scripted, externally imposed, less extensive training may give some teachers a sense of security but also create tensions between the scripts 'perceived effectiveness and the teachers' desires for autonomy, and, for new teachers, between autonomy and the difficulty of independently designing curricula and methods. I argue that these reactions suggest that educators in traditional pre-service teacher education programs may want to experiment with offering an autonomous choice of distinctly different instructional models, including scripted ones such as Direct Instruction and Success for All, in which teachers in training in professional learning communities may become deeply skilled. I also argue that script developers may want to experiment with giving teachers more explicit autonomy, both in choosing scripts and in modifying them, and more extensive pre-service training. I recommend more comparative research on teachers' reactions to scripts, especially on new teachers. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

Language: English

ISSN: 0161-4681

Article

Mengte suo li jiaoxue fa dui xueling qian naotan ertong ren zhi de yingxiang / 蒙特梭利教学法对学龄前脑瘫儿童认知的影响 [Effect of Montessori Teaching Method on Cognition of Preschool Children with Cerebral Palsy]

Publication: Zhongguo Fuyou Jiankang Yanjiu / 中国妇幼健康研究 [Chinese Journal of Maternal and Child Health Research], vol. 29, no. 6

Pages: 685-690

⛔ No DOI found

See More

Abstract/Notes: Objective To explore the application effect of Montessori teaching method on cognitive training of children with cerebral palsy (CP) .Methods A total of 116 children with CP aged 30 - 36 months old who were admitted to the department of children healthcare and rehabilitation in Xianyang Caihong Hospital during July 2013 to July 2016 were selected and divided into two groups randomly .The children in control group (n = 57) were given conventional cognitive teaching ,while the children in intervention group (n = 59) adopted the Montessori teaching method to carry out cognitive teaching .The teaching lasted for 12 months ,and each assessment was conducted ,recorded and analyzed statistically at the 6th ,9th ,and 12th month respectively .Results After training for 9 and 12 months ,the completion rate of the children in color matching test in the intervention group was better than that in the control group (χ2 value was 5 .098 and 5 .954 ,respectively ,both P < 0 .05) .After training for 6 months ,in 4 items such as color matching ,item matching ,color expression ,and shape expression ,the speed of children in the intervention group was higher than that in the control group (t value was 2 .041 ,3 .037 ,2 .155 and 2 .468 ,respectively ,all P < 0 .05) .After training for 9 months ,the matching speed and expression attention speed of 3 dimensions including color ,shape and item of children in the intervention group were all higher than those in the control group (t value was 2 .856 ,3 .454 ,5 .509 ,5 .837 ,8 .424 and 4 .923 , respectively ,all P < 0 .05) .After training for 12 months ,the matching speed and expression attention speed of the 3 dimensions including color ,shape and item of children in the intervention group were all higher than those in the control group (t value was 2 .888 ,3 .273 ,6 .672 ,6 .672 ,3 .567 and 4 .290 ,respectively ,all P < 0 .05) .For the errors number in the color matching test after training for 9 and 12 months ,and the errors number in the color expression test after training for 12 month ,the children in the intervention group were less than those in the control group (t value was 2 .713 ,2 .846 and 2 .467 ,respectively ,all P < 0 .05) . Conclusion The Montessori teaching method can promote the cognitive development of children with CP .

Language: Chinese

ISSN: 1673-5293

Article

President Wilson's Daughter to Aid Mme. Montessori Show Her System

Available from: Library of Congress

Publication: The Sun (New York) (New York City, NY)

Pages: 6

Americas, Maria Montessori - Biographic sources, North America, United States of America

See More

Abstract/Notes: The Montessori movement, considered by many a radical departure from traditional educational methods, will receive new emphasis and publicity from the fact that visitors to the Panama-Pacific International Exposition will see during the months of August, September, October and November not only a demonstration of the Montessori system but will see it conducted by the talented woman herself. Associated with her will be Miss Margaret Wilson, daughter of the President, Dr. David Starr Jordan, chancellor of Leland Stanford Junior University, and other well known educators. The Montessori method has been summed up as 'freedom for development of the child under best conditions disturbing as little as possible but helping buy every means this development.' Any estimate of Mme. Montessori's work to be of practical value will involve a comparison between the Montessori method and that of the kindergarten, since the kindergarten is the only system of organizes educational work for young children that has so far received general recognition. In the middle of the last century the sensitive woman soul and philosophic mind of Froebel grasped the fundamental principle of development and say that the first six or seven years are the most important in the life of the individual. After years of study he embodied what he conceived to be the fundamental principles of the education of little children in what is known as the kindergarten, and his ideas of the best means for the application of these principles in his kindergarten program, materials and devices. The discovery of the kindergarten marked a new era in the history of the educational world. Though suppressed for years by government authority in Germany, and received with much suspicion elsewhere, the kindergarten has become an integral part of the public school system of many cities and States in our country. Its introduction into England was championed by Charles Dickens, and in America it found an advocate in the philosopher and educator Dr. William T. Harris. Concerning the kindergarten and the Montessori methods, Dr. P. P. Claxton, United States Commissioner of Education says: 'Though aims and principles are the same for both Froebel and Montessori, their different methods of approach have resulted in difference in emphasis, program and decides. For those who see no further than the form there is apparent conflict. Many cannot understand that the work of both Froebel and Montessori must finally lose each its distinctive characteristics in the larger whole of a more perfect knowledge of the nature of infancy and the means of educating young children.' It must be said of Dr. Montessori that she is first, last and always scientific in her work. Prolonged training in the sciences that relate to human life, vitalized by practical experience in their application to defective children, gave her a method which is the outcome of genius, training and experience. She swung into prominence, against her wish, in the following way: While serving as assistant doctor at the psychiatric clinic of the University of Rome, Italy, she founder herself differing from her colleagues in that she felt, as she says, 'that mental deficiency presented chiefly a pedagogic rather than mainly a medical problem.' The expression of these views in an address brought Dr. Montessori prominently before the Minister of Public Instruction, and her work from this on assumed a public character. Her belief that the methods employed with deficient children 'contained educational principles more rational than those in use and that if applied to normal children they would develop or set free their personality in a marvelous and surprising way,' became her controlling idea, and is the very heart of the Montessori system. The system of Mme. Montessori is indissolubly joined with her famous 'didactic material.' Among this will be found small wooden frames to which are attached pieces of cloth or leather on which are buttons and buttonholes, hooks and eyes, eyelets and lacing cords, and strings to be tied and untied. There are also boxes of cylindrical insets and other simple devices to develop 'man's mystery over nature.' Mme. Montessori is her best interpreter when she says, 'We are inclined to believe that children are like puppets and we wash them and feed them as if they were dolls. We do not stop to think that the child that does not do does not know how to do. Our duty is that of helping him to make a conquest of such useful acts as nature intended he should perform for himself. The mother who feeds her child without making the least effort to teach him to hold the spoon for himself and to try to find his mouth with it is not a wise mother. She treats her son as though he were a doll. We call an individual disciplined when he is master of himself and can regulate his own conduct when it shall be necessary to follow some rule of life. If any educational act is to be efficacious it is necessary rigorously to avoid the arrest of spontaneous movements and the imposition of arbitrary tasks. It is of course understood here that we do not speak of a useless or dangerous act; this must be suppressed, destroyed.' The Montessori doctrine is therefore in substance that the child's inner self or personalit cannot rightfully develop unless free to express itself undirected and unguided by another person. As a consequence Dr. Montessori insists that each child be allowed bodily freedom and have as much unhampered liberty of action as possible in order that he may fully express his inner life in outer activity. The classic illustration by which Dr. Montessori puts in concrete form her doctrine is the following: 'One day the children had gathered in a circle about a basin of water containing some floating toys. A little boy 2 1/2 years old had been left outside the circle. He drew near to the other children and tried to force his way among them, but he was not strong enough to do this. The expression of thought on his face was intensely interesting. His eyes then lighted upon a little chair and he had evidently made up his mind to place it behind the group of children and climb on it. As he began to move toward the chair, his face illuminated with hope, a teacher seized him in her arms, lifted him above the heads of the other children, showed him the basin of water, saying, 'Come poor little one you shall see too.' The child seeing the floating toys did not experience the joy that he was about to feel through conquering the obstacles with his own force. The teacher hindered the child in this case from educating himself. The little fellow was about to feel himself a conqueror, and instead he found himself held within two imprisoning arms impotent.' The now famous 'House of the Children' in Rome, under the patronage of Queen Margherita, faithfully reflects and demonstrates the Montessori principles and methods. It has been described as an old orphan asylum, whose gray outer walls give no idea of the two beautiful and luxuriant courtyards within. These latter are filled with beds of blossoming plans, and the pillars of the inner porch are covered with clinging vines. The schoolroom in which the class for the children is held opens with wide double doors into one of these lovely courtyards, where the children play during hours in which they are not engaged in their Montessori exercises. Miss Elizabeth Harrison, president of the National Kindergarten Union says of this 'House of the Children': 'On my first visit I found the children busy getting out the 'didactic material' with which they were to employ themselves for the next hour and a quarter. Some came forward to shake hands with me; some merely smiled and nodded and did not interrupt their work. All seemed busy, happy and free. I afterward saw as many as eighty visitors in the room where there were only a dozen children, but none of the children were in the least disturbed by or seemingly conscious of the presence of the visitors. Most of the children came from nearby tenement houses, yet even the youngest of them washed their own hands and faces, put on clean, neat calico aprons and looked as fresh and clean as children from well cared for homes.' Comparing the kindergarten and the Montessori systems, the following differences appear: The kindergarten stresses group activities, while the Montessori system emphasized almost exclusively the development of the individual. The kindergartners say that education in coordinating of muscles, the special training of the child's senses and all such phases of individual development are expected to come in the nursery. The Montessori system has no place for stories; the kindergartners are famous for them. Mme. Montessori objects to stories for young children on the theory that all activities of the mind are derived from the outside world and are dependent on sense impressions, and that therefore the child should be kept within the realm of his own personal experience until he is at least 7 or 8 years old. It is not necessary to add that two __ meet at this point of difference. The most remarkable features of the Montessori system, as well as one of its decided points of divergence from the kindergarten, lies in its ___ of definite attitude on religious training. Froebel, trained in an environment where instruction in religion is practically nationwide, says that while the child unconsciously manifests teh divine impuse within him he must follow it with conscious insights persisting in what he knows to do right and must needs have definite training of this kind. Montessori, on the other hand, with nuns as her assistants and attendants in her 'House of the Children,' acknowledges the importance of religious training for little children, 'but confesses that as yet it is an unsolved problem to her.' Miss Harrison, who spent some time in Rome with Mme. Montessori says, 'She [Montessori] seems to feel that a child's spiritual nature will ___ aright if freedom is given ....

Language: English

Advanced Search