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579 results

Article

Nongraded Primary Education

Available from: ERIC

Publication: ERIC Digest, no. 74

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: In nongraded education, children of different ages and ability levels are taught together and make continuous progress rather than being promoted once per year. Research studies support nongraded primary education by indicating that young children vary in their rates of intellectual development and learn best through hands-on activities with concrete materials. In addition, participation in mixed-age groups has social and cognitive benefits. Teaching multi-age classes requires more teacher preparation time and knowledge about child development, integrated curriculum, and instructional strategies. The implementation of nongraded education is facilitated by the following: (1) understanding and support by teachers and parents; (2) practical training for teachers; and (3) support by both administrators and school boards. (MLF)

Language: English

Book

The Case for Mixed-Age Grouping in Early Education

Available from: ERIC

Early childhood education, Nongraded schools

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Abstract/Notes: In six brief chapters, mixed-age grouping of young children in schools and child care centers is explored and advocated. Chapter 1 defines mixed-age grouping, examines limitations of single-age grouping, and points out positive characteristics of mixed-age classes. Chapter 2 discusses social development as seen in children's interactions in mixed-age groups. Various studies are cited that focus on how children perceive one another and adapt their behavior and expectations accordingly, how children exhibit specific prosocial behaviors in mixed-age situations, and how children's group participation varies. Chapter 3 reviews studies on the cognitive effects of mixed-age grouping, concluding that psychologists and educators do not yet fully understand how mixed-age interaction affects cognitive development, and calling for more research on the interactive processes involved and the teacher's role in them. Chapter 4 discusses two strategies for mixed-age learning: peer tutoring and cooperative learning. Chapter 5 describes examples of successful implementation of mixed-age programs, including a 2-year kindergarten at the University of Northern Iowa's Malcolm Price Laboratory School, and the Fajans School in Sweden where elementary school-age children were not grouped by age or ability. Chapter 6 addresses four basic questions about implementing mixed-age grouping. A brief section giving conclusions and recommendations is provided, followed by 63 bibliographic citations and appended suggestions for teachers working with mixed-age groups.

Language: English

Published: Washington, D.C.: National Association for the Education of Young Children, 1990

ISBN: 0-935989-31-5

Series: NAEYC , 333

Report

Prekindergarten Head Start, Year End Report, 1974-1975

Available from: ERIC

Americas, Child development, Classroom environment, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Head Start programs, North America, Parent participation, Prepared environment, Students - Evaluation, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: The Philadelphia Prekindergarten Head Start Program is a child development program for three- and four-year old children from low-income families funded through the Philadelphia Anti-Poverty Action Commission. The approach stresses an interacting and multidisciplinary attempt to improve the child's physical and emotional health, his family relationships, and his abilities to function better as a person. The program has been designed to implement five different early childhood education models: Behavioral Analysis, Bank Street, Montessori, Responsive Learning, and Curriculum for Social and Emotional Development. Programming according to model specifications remained the theoretical basis for daily operation. Research and evaluation activities during 1974-75 have centered around the program's goals for children. They have included classroom observations, the development of forms to assess the extent of model implementation, summarizing and analyzing the results of the Denver Developmental Screening Test, and the inclusion of the children in the Early Childhood Longitudinal File. There was found to be a wide range of practices in terms (1) extent of model implementation, (2) classroom differences within a model, (3) grouping practices, (4) frequency of parent volunteers, and (5) provisioning. Observation data yielding the above information are summarized according to model and across the total program.

Language: English

Published: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Jul 1975

Thesis

Proyecto Educativo de Innovación y Aporte Social como Enlace Urbano: 'Centro de exploración y creatividad Carimagua' [Educational project for Innovation and Social Contribution as an Urban Link: 'Center for Exploration and Creativity Carimagua']

Available from: Universidad Católica de Colombia - Repositorio Institucional

Americas, Colombia, Educational change, Latin America and the Caribbean, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., South America

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Abstract/Notes: Partiendo de la premisa del déficit de infraestructura educativa de la localidad de Kennedy y de la deserción escolar dentro de la misma, el proyecto busca contribuir a la solución del problema de oferta acrecentado por la implementación de la jornada única en algunas instituciones educativas, dando prioridad a la continuidad en el proceso educativo de niños y niñas , para ello se plantea a partir de la necesidad de infraestructuras que permitan desarrollar un modelo pedagógico que atraiga a niños y niñas durante sus primeros años de vida a la continuidad de sus saberes con entusiasmo y ánimo de emprendedores, por ello se propone el “modelo pedagógico de María Montessori”. Para finalizar lo que se espera del proyecto dentro del sector, es que se pueda implementar el modelo pedagógico mencionado y así se genere un impacto social que es medible en los siguientes aspectos: innovación, participación de la comunidad, incremento del interés en los procesos educativos, para que a partir de esto se vea reflejado en la mejoría de infraestructuras, aumento de cupos escolares mejorando así la calidad de la educación. [Starting from the premise of the deficit of educational infrastructure of the town of Kennedy and the school dropout within it, the project seeks to contribute to the solution of the supply problem enhanced by the implementation of the single day in some educational institutions, giving priority to the continuity in the educational process of boys and girls for it arises, from the need infrastructures that allow to develop a pedagogical model that attracts children during their first years of life to the continuity of their knowledge with enthusiasm and encouragement of entrepreneurs, for that reason the "pedagogical model of Maria Montessori" is proposed. To finish what is expected of the project within the sector is that the aforementioned pedagogical model can be implemented and thus generate a social impact that is measurable in the following aspects: innovation, community participation, increased interest in educational processes, so that from this it is reflected in the improvement of infrastructures, increase of school quotas thus improving the quality of education.]

Language: Spanish

Published: Bogotá, Colombia, 2019

Book

Lillian de Lissa, Women Teachers and Teacher Education in the Twentieth Century: A Transnational History

Australasia, Australia, Australia and New Zealand, Lillian de Lissa - Biographic sources, Montessori method of education, Oceania

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Abstract/Notes: Beginning with Lillian de Lissa’s career as foundation principal of the Adelaide Kindergarten Training College in Australia (1907–1917) and Gipsy Hill Training College in London (1917–1947), and incorporating the lives and work of her Australian and British graduates, this book illuminates the transnational circulation of knowledge about teacher education and early childhood education in the twentieth century. Acutely aware of anxieties regarding the role of modern women and the social positioning of teachers, students who attended college under de Lissa’s leadership experienced a progressive institutional culture and comprehensive preparation for work as kindergarten, nursery and infant teachers. Drawing on a broad range of archival material, this study explores graduates’ professional and domestic lives, leisure activities and civic participation, from their initial work as novice teachers through diverse life paths to their senior years. Due to the interwar marriage bar, many women teachers married, resigned from paid work and became mothers. The book explores their experiences, along with those of lifelong teachers whose work spread across a range of educational fields and different parts of the world. Although most graduates spent their lives in Australia or England, de Lissa’s personal and professional networks traversed the British dominions and colonies, Europe and the USA, fostering fascinating global connections between people, places and educational ideas.

Language: English

Published: New York, NY: Peter Lang, 2016

ISBN: 978-3-0343-1955-3

Report

An Analysis of Activities in Preschool Settings. Final Report

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Abstract/Notes: This research was aimed at an analysis of classroom activities which make up educational programs for young children. Its broad purpose was to analyze systematically and to make comparisons among six preschool programs in order to describe the patterns of activity settings used; the objectives activity settings were designed to reach from the point of view of their designers, classroom teachers; and the social behaviors of teachers and children which are shaped and molded by the requirements of settings and which have not necessarily been planned for or recognized by teachers. The six preschool settings used for the study include a Montessori nursery school, a Head Start program, two laboratory nursery school classrooms, a franchise day care center, and a community day care center. The first section of the report contains discussion of related research, a theoretical model, the six preschool classrooms, and the research procedures. The presentation of the results comprises the rest of the report. The findings are divided into three parts: a quantified picture of six classrooms in terms of activity characteristics and social interaction; an exploration of the relations between the activity and social interaction values; and an examination of the relationship of the personal characteristics of the children to activity participation and social interaction. (SDH)

Language: English

Published: Washington, D.C., 1973

Article

Role of Physical Instructional Materials in Early Childhood Learning Centres

Available from: ResearchGate

Publication: Pragyamanch, vol. 30, no. 15

Asia, Montessori method of education, Nepal, South Asia

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Abstract/Notes: The primary aim of this research is to assess the existing situation of instructional material in various public and private early childhood development centres of Lekhnath Municipality, Nepal. The sample was selected on the basis of different stratified random sampling comprised of 2 primaries, 2 lower secondary, 4 higher secondary and two fully community managed schools with the total of 27 schools around Lekhnath, whose school grade start with pre education were included of 10 sampled pre-primary schools. Data, observation by researcher, semi-structured questionnaire were obtained from of early childhood education program and formal discussion with parents comprises (N=30+10+10) additional interview data were obtained from 10 sample schools teachers/facilitators 10 head master were included. Direct observation was based on national educational and Montessori guidance were designing and implementing their programs. The study revealed that majority of community managed ECDs have (81.2%) instructional materials available with them; however, there is the increase in enrolment in private primary schools with English medium (7.3%). The enrolments in private ECDs are almost double as compared Governmental funded school in the year 2001-2012. Results indicated that there were inadequate educational materials in early childhood centres in public managed schools (primary, secondary and high) and low community participation in materials management. There has been little focus on the quality of early school management of learning materials. To improve program quality, more facilities, more time, and institutional recognition of their program’s value, financial support, and professional development opportunities were compulsory full-day play with learning, day snacks, government and local community should provide the more funds to manage child friendly pre-kindergarten can only meet holistic management of early child of Nepal.

Language: English

ISSN: 2392-442X

Doctoral Dissertation

Tibetanization Project: Teachers' Meanings and Perspectives

Available from: University of Virginia

Asia, Displaced communities, India, Refugees, South Asia, Tibet

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Abstract/Notes: This study investigates meanings and perspectives of Tibetan elementary school teachers with regard to Tibetan medium education termed as the Tibetanization Project. It is a qualitative study in which assertions were generated based on common themes that emerged from the participating teachers' shared perspectives. The research questions that guided this study were: (a) What does Tibetanization mean to teachers in Tibetan Children's Village (TCV) schools in India? (b) How has the Tibetanization Project changed the instructional methods of teachers? (c) Has the Tibetanization Project made education more relevant for the Tibetan children? If so, how? If not, why not? (d) How do teachers perceive the Tibetan language and cultural acquisition among the children under the Tibetanization Project? and (e) How does Tibetan medium education affect the Tibetan people in exile? As a result of the research carried out: (1) The Tibetan teachers believe that although teaching of English as a subject is important, instruction solely in a foreign language at the primary school level can deter complete understanding of important concepts, and hinder acquisition of both languages, native and foreign. (2) In order to preserve the Tibetan language and give a quality education to Tibetan children, it is imperative to use the mother tongue as the medium of instruction at the primary school level. (3) The Tibetanization Project has encouraged active participation, critical thinking, and problem solving skills among Tibetan refugee students. (4) The Tibetanization Project has enriched Tibetan vocabulary both Tibetan teachers and students of elementary schools. (5) In spite of the above mentioned benefits, teachers still doubt the practicality of the Tibetanization Project in exile. (6) Teachers believe that a Tibetan medium education would be more practical if Tibet was a free country, but because that Tibetans live in exile, education in English medium is more vital for a successful life.

Language: English

Published: Charlottesville, Virginia, 2001

Article

Wondering Aloud

Available from: ERIC

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 41, no. 1

Pages: 51-68

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Presenting the Montessori tools of the Great Lessons highlights the power of storytelling in teaching. Carla Foster suggests that children should be aware of how their learning increases as wonder points them to the mystery of the unknown. Engaging in the dialect of wonder during presentations can bring participants to attention by suggesting that "all the world is a stage" and they each have roles to play. She implores educators to go deeply with their children through sustained conversations of curiosity that will lead to gained social skills, equal participation, and building public speaking skills. A bibliography is included. [This article comes from the talk presented at the NAMTA conference titled "Oral and Written Pathways to Self-Expression" in Columbia, MD, October 8-11, 2015.]

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

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