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873 results

Book

Preschools and Montessori Preschools: A Discussion

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Language: English

Published: Newtown, Australia: Nursery School Teacher's College, 1980

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Development of Social, Personal and Cognitive Skills of Preschool Children in Montessori and Traditional Preschool Programs

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: Early Child Development and Care, vol. 72, no. 1

Pages: 117-124

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Abstract/Notes: The relationship between time in Montessori and Traditional Preschool programs and the preschool child's develoment of [1] personal skills, [2] relationship with teachers, [3] peer relations, [4] behavioral control, and [5] cognitive skills with age controlled was used to compare the relative effectiveness of the programs. This design was necessary since it is likely that parents who select the Montessori program for their child are different from parents selecting traditional preschool programs for their children. Three Montessori programs [n = 108] and three traditional programs [n = 116] provided the subjects for the study. The Pre Kindergarten Scale [PKS], a multiple choice behavioral rating scale was completed by the programs’ teachers on each child. The results revealed that the only variable significant in predicting time in program for the traditional program, relationship with teacher, was the only variable insignificant in predicting length of time in program for the Montessori program. The strongest relationship was for length of time in the Montessori program and relationship with peers [18 percent of variance] with age controlled.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1080/0300443910720111

ISSN: 0300-4430, 1476-8275

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Approaches Adopted by Preschools to Foster Literacy Skills Among Preschoolers

Available from: Language in India

Publication: Language in India, vol. 11, no. 10

Pages: 150-170

Asia, India, South Asia

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Abstract/Notes: Pre-school programs give children an edge in a competitive world and education climate. It teaches children the basic skills necessary to be successful in formal schooling. Pre-schools provide children a good foundation for continued learning, communication, higher self-esteem and enjoyment of the learning process. Pre-schools have the important task of giving children numerous and varied opportunities to promote children’s development during the formative years including physical development, social development and literary competence. Literary competences open the door to academic learning and help ensure later success in school. The present study was conducted to elicit information on the approaches adopted by pre-schools to foster literary skills among pre-schoolers in Bangalore city. A representative sample of 30 preschool centres were surveyed - 9 Montessori, 8 kindergarten, 8 play-way and 5 crèches. After an introductory session in the preschool centres, a self-developed questionnaire was distributed to the preschool teachers to elicit information on the approaches adopted by pre-schools to foster literary skills among pre-schoolers. Analysis of data obtained indicated that the preschools surveyed had no adequate approaches to foster literary skills in pre-schoolers. Also the preschools surveyed had no adequate library facilities.

Language: English

ISSN: 1930-2940

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Physical Activity in Preschool Children: Comparison Between Montessori and Traditional Preschools

Available from: Wiley Online Library

Publication: Journal of School Health, vol. 84, no. 11

Pages: 716-721

Americas, Comparative education, Montessori method of education - Evaluation, North America, Physical education, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Little is known about the influence of Montessori methods on children's physical activity (PA). This cross-sectional study compared PA of children attending Montessori and traditional preschools. We enrolled 301 children in 9 Montessori and 8 traditional preschools in Columbia, South Carolina. PA was measured by accelerometry on weekdays during preschool (In-School), non-school (Non-School), and all day (All Day). Minutes/hour of light, moderate-to-vigorous (MVPA), and total PA (light + MVPA) were calculated. Children attending Montessori preschools accumulated more In-School light (7.7 vs. 6.5 minute/hour), MVPA (7.7 versus 6.5 minute/hour), and total PA (15.4 versus 13.0 minute/hour) than children attending traditional preschools, after adjusting for sex, race/ethnicity, body mass index, parent education and neighborhood poverty index. For Non-School (8.5 versus 6.2 minute/hour) and All Day (8.5 versus 7.6 minute/hour), children in Montessori preschools accumulated more MVPA than children in traditional preschools. In-School PA was higher for children in private Montessori than public Montessori preschools (8.1 versus 7.0 minute/hour; 8.1 versus 6.7 minute/hour; 16.1 versus 13.6 minute/hour, for light, MVPA, and total PA, respectively). Children attending Montessori preschools were more active than children attending traditional preschools. Adopting the Montessori system may be an important strategy for promoting PA in children.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1111/josh.12207

ISSN: 1746-1561

Article

Montessori Way of Teaching Preschoolers: The Panacea for Effective Learning and Swift Comprehension of the Subject Matter by Preschoolers in Akwa Ibom and Abia States

Available from: Global Academic Star

Publication: Shared Season Journal of Topical Issues, vol. 9, no. 1

Pages: 49-63

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Abstract/Notes: The study investigated the effectiveness of the Montessori way of teaching preschoolers in Akwa Ibom and Abia states in Nigeria. A correlational survey design was employed, and 200 preschoolers were selected using stratified sampling. A structured questionnaire called the Montessori Way of Teaching Preschoolers and Effective Learning Questionnaire (MTPELQ) was used for data collection. Face and content validation of the instrument was carried out by an expert in test, measurement, and evaluation. The reliability coefficient obtained was 0.83. The researcher subjected the data generated for this study to appropriate statistical techniques such as descriptive statistics and simple regression analysis. The test for significance was done at 0.05 alpha levels. The results showed that the Montessori method, particularly the "Prepared environment," had the highest percentage value among the different teaching approaches. Furthermore, there was a high extent of learning observed as a result of the Montessori way of teaching. The study also revealed a strong to perfect relationship between Montessori teaching and effective learning. The calculated F-value indicated a significant effect of Montessori teaching on learning. The study concluded that the Montessori approach is beneficial for all children, fostering their natural curiosity and respect for knowledge. One of the recommendations was that the integration of Montessori principles and methodologies into the preschool curriculum in Akwa Ibom and Abia states to enhance active engagement and comprehension of subjects.

Language: English

ISSN: 2630–7290

Conference Paper

Exploring the Social Logic of Preschool Environments Structured with Waldorf, Montessori, and Reggio Emilia: A Semantic and Syntactic Study on Preschool Environments

Available from: ResearchGate

Space Syntax Symposium (13th, 20-24 June 2022)

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Abstract/Notes: Kindergartens are socio-spatial organizations with their social and cultural as well as their spatial structures which prepare children to be responsible members of the society. In the ear ly years of the twentieth century, the issue of how to raise new generations was one of the primary research areas of many educational scientists, especially in Europe, and therefore different progressive pedagogical methods were generated. Among these views, the Waldorf pedagogical approach developed by Rudolf Steiner, Montessori pedagogical approach developed by Maria Montessori, and Reggio Emilia pedagogical approach developed by Loris Malaguzzi became prominent. Although these three pedagogical approaches have a common view that the child should be accepted as an individual with his/her rights, each of them involved different physical environment requirements in the context of their educational philosophies. The projects obtained in an architectural design studio course constitute the focus of this paper and it aims to decipher the semantic and syntactic characteristics based on twelve student projects. The semantic dimension of the study was revealed by coding the related themes through students' project reports while the syntactic dimension of the study demonstrated the prioritized social interaction area through isovist area and variance values. Considering the semantic results, it was revealed that the students not only comprehended the spatial requirements of a specific educational pedagogy but also grasped the transformative power of the methods, in terms of physical, social, and natural characteristics. Considering the syntactic results, the fact that the mean isovist area value was higher in Reggio Emilia schools showed that the piazza dominates the physical setting. The fact that the school cluster with the highest variance value emerged in Montessori draws attention to the changeability of isovist perimeter value within the interiors to orientate the individuals to the classroom units.

Language: English

Published: Bergen, Norway: Western Norway University of Applied Sciences, 2022

Pages: 25 p.

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

The Potential for Using Visual Elicitation in Understanding Preschool Teachers’ Beliefs of Appropriate Educational Practices

Available from: African Journals Online

Publication: South African Journal of Education, vol. 32, no. 4

Pages: 393-405

Africa, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, East Africa, Kenya, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, South Africa, Southern Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa

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Abstract/Notes: We explore the use of video and photo elicitation in a research study undertaken to understand the way in which preschool teachers perceive and construct their provision of children’s educational experiences. We explore the value of visually elicited interviews based on video footage and photographs captured during teaching and learning in four classrooms in two preschool settings in Kenya. Through visually elicited interviews, both the teachers and the researcher constructed meaningful conversations (interviews) to explore preschool teachers’ practical experiences and their beliefs, understanding and interpretation of developmentally appropriate educational practices. This paper targets the possible value of and contribution made by visual data generation procedures, as well as their inherent challenges, in order to add to the body of knowledge on visually elicited interviews.

Language: English

DOI: 10.15700/saje.v32n4a661

ISSN: 2076-3433

Master's Thesis

Montessori and Religious Education in Western Cape Preschools

Available from: University of Cape Town

Africa, Catholic schools, Comparative education, Jewish religious schools, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, Religious education, South Africa, Southern Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa

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Abstract/Notes: The debate about whether or not religious education should be included in early childhood education is a longstanding one. Even those who believe that Religious education should be included in early childhood programs cannot agree about the content or method for including it. The phenomenon of religious education in Montessori pre-primary schools in the Western Cape Province of South Africa is explored in this study, using a qualitative research approach. More specifically, the study explored the goals of their religious education; the level of awareness of Montessori's approach to religious education and finally looked at how they were implementing religion in their schools. A sample of 4 pre-schools were selected from the 90 Montessori pre-schools in the Western Cape. These included a Non-Denominational, Muslim, Christian and a Jewish School. The Muslim and Non-Denominational schools are full Montessori schools, while the Christian and Jewish schools have incorporated Montessori alongside other curriculums, namely the Jubilee Excellence School Curriculum and Reggio-Emilia approach, respectively. A collective case study approach was adopted and data was collected through observations and interviews. While the findings cannot easily be generalized, it is significant in providing a starting point to understanding the phenomenon of religious education in Montessori pre-schools in the Western Cape. The study highlighted Dr Montessori's personal and professional struggle with religion and found that the struggles Dr Montessori faced in terms of Religion have still not been resolved today. The schools in the Western Cape still grappled with the essence of Montessori's struggle, i.e. where to place religion and how to integrate it in the Montessori method and philosophy. Dr Montessori's beliefs about the importance of spirituality in the early years were found to be consistent with the contemporary views of scholars around the world. The religious schools followed guidelines of their own religions when deciding on which values to focus on. At the Jewish school, the focus was on the community, while at the Muslim school the focus was on the individual and selfetiquette. The focus of the Christian school was on discipline and obedience. The schools had various commitments to spiritual and ethical development of the children. Finally, the study found that the Montessori method was ideal for teaching the practices of religion, but when schools delved into issues of faith or love of God, they switched to other modes of teaching (e.g. preaching). This disjuncture between teaching faith and practices was ultimately Dr Montessori's reason for abolishing religious education from her method.

Language: English

Published: Cape Town, South Africa, 2017

Article

Montessori Education in Preschool Institutions

Available from: Zenodo

Publication: Modern Science and Research, vol. 2, no. 8

Pages: 278-283

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Abstract/Notes: In the classroom, teachers must strike a balance between direct teaching, teacher-led play, and student-led play. During the game, children can make the most of their creativity, language, social skills, self-control and other talents. The best learning happens when students are given a wide variety of activities and topics that they enjoy. Montessori education emphasizes helping children develop their sensory abilities. An organized, aesthetically beautiful and well organized Montessori environment gives children a sense of security and encourages discovery. Freedom of movement, choice and participation in independent activities helps children to discover their passions and potential. Montessori programs encourage the possibility of losing yourself in any activity. Having choice and feeling in control of the environment is associated with higher academic achievement. Children who have a regular family routine and are considered more organized show better results in cognitive, psychological and social development. In order to stimulate further research and better inform teachers about whether and why the Montessori method can be useful, this article aims to provide an overview of the evidence base for this method.

Language: Uzbek

DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.8268057

ISSN: 2181-3906

Article

Montessori-Pädagogik und die Blindenpädagogik [Montessori education and education for the blind]

Publication: Das Kind, no. 26

Pages: 74-78

Blind, Children with disabilities, Inclusive education, Montessori method of education

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Language: German

ISSN: 0949-2682

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