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63 results

Article

Binkan-ki no seishin seirigaku / 敏感期の精神生理学 [Psychophysiology of the Sensitive Period]

Publication: Montessori Kyōiku / モンテッソーリ教育 [Montessori Education], no. 6

Pages: 34-44

Asia, East Asia, Japan

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Language: Japanese

ISSN: 0913-4220

Montessori's Reading Principles Involving Sensitive Period and Method Compared to Reading Principles of Contemporary Reading Specialists

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Language: English

Published: Cincinnati, Ohio, 1966

Article

Supporting Sensory-Sensitive Children in a Sensory-Intensive World

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 29, no. 1

Pages: 34-39

Children with disabilities, Inclusive education, Sensory disorders in children, Sensory integration dysfunction in children

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Abstract/Notes: For American children with educational challenges, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (or DSM-5) (American Psychiatric Association, 2013), is critically important because inclusion of a disorder in the DSM-5 allows for treatment and support to be paid for by the child's public school district if it interferes with his or her educational achievement. Early parent observation of sensory differences is often a child's first reported sign of autism, occurring as early as 9-12 months of age (Murray-Slutsky & Paris, 2000; Baranek, 2002). * Sensory profiles can distinguish among children with autism, children with ADHD, and children without those diagnoses (Tomchek & Dunn, 2007; Yochman, Parush, & Ornoy, 2004). * Well-developed sensory integration has strong correlation with academic achievement and cognitive processing. Early detection and management of sensory challenges can tie to predicting later academic performance deficits (Parham, 1998; Koenig & Rudney, 2010). * In a review of studies examining links between SI and ADHD, sensory-motor abilities of children with ADHD were lower than those of a control group. Other literature examines connections with disorders ranging from fragile X syndrome, mood disorders, behavioral disorders, and nonverbal learning disabilities (NVLD) to physically based conditions, such as premature birth, prenatal drug exposure, cerebral palsy/spina bifida/ Down syndrome, language delay, and other learning disabilities, as well as environmentally caused deficits, including abuse, neglect, or trauma.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Montessori's Reading Principles Involving Sensitive Period Method Compared to Reading Principles of Contemporary Reading Specialists

Available from: JSTOR

Publication: The Reading Teacher, vol. 21, no. 2

Pages: 163-168

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Language: English

ISSN: 0034-0561

Article

...Making Children Sensitive to the Beauties of the World

Publication: Communications (Association Montessori Internationale, 195?-2008), vol. 2005, no. 2-3

Pages: 19

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Language: English

ISSN: 0519-0959

Article

The Sensitive Period and the Study of Geography and History

Publication: Montessori Notes, vol. 1, no. 6

Pages: 111–112

Montessori Society (United Kingdom) - Periodicals

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Language: English

Article

Sensitive Period for Language and Literacy

Publication: Montessori NewZ, vol. 45

Pages: 5

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Language: English

Article

When Sensory Sensitivity Requires Intervention: Assessment and Treatment of Sensory-sensitive Children

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 29, no. 3

Pages: 38-43

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Abstract/Notes: In other words, observers must look at the sensory stimuli in a given environment at the time a behavior occurs (Williamson & Anzalone, 2001). [...]diagnosis requires extensive observation of a child across multiple environments over time. Over time and with frequent reinforcement, a child can demonstrate growth in a range of areas and behaviors as a result of a successful course of therapy; for example, a child experiencing numerous hypersensitivities might show improvements in motor planning, more participation in activities with peers, more flexibility in eating a variety of foods, and/or less fear related to gross-motor activities (Schaaf & Nightlinger, 2007). If these techniques are utilized consistently, OTs believe student behaviors and performance can improve in many concrete, measurable areas, ranging from general attention, focus, and behavior to self-calming, quality of academic work, fine-motor skills (including handwriting), and memory retention. [...]OTs also emphasize the importance of consistent, ongoing communication between therapists, parents, and teachers of children who are receiving SI therapy, in order to maximize the benefit of therapy and provide reinforcement of therapy techniques across a child's daily environments.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Classroom Solutions for Sensory-Sensitive Students

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 29, no. 2

Pages: 45-49

Children with disabilities, Inclusive education, Montessori method of education, People with disabilities, Sensory disorders in children, Sensory integration dysfunction in children, Special education

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Abstract/Notes: Soon after No Child Left Behind (NCLB) legislation was signed into law in the U.S. (2002), an increasing emphasis in schools on high-stakes testing performance resulted in a decrease in recess and movement time, including physical education for Elementary students (Ohanian, 2002). Since the hazard of unmonitored television time was first explored by Marie Winn in The Plug-In Drug (1977, revised 2002), the allure of screens too early and too often has only become an increasing challenge for both parents and educators. Providing dedicated time for movement and nature are important general guidelines for parents and educators to remember, but there are also classroom-based tools available that teachers can implement into the school day to promote sensory health and positive behaviors in their students. Some individual tools that could be set up in the classroom to be utilized by students, perhaps even as a classroom work or on a "sensory shelf," might include the following: * Hand-size fidgets and squeeze balls of varying textures and firmness levels; * Headphones (noise-canceling, silent or with music); * Lap weights; * Fine-motor activities that allow for accommodations and sensory variety (e.g., sensory table, Practical Life, and art works); * Colored glasses (to mute visual input or block flickering of fluorescent lights); * Stretch/resistance bands; * Massage balls or a foam roller; * Chewing tools (pencil toppers, pendants, gum, etc.).

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Montessori Language and the Sensitive Period for the Imagination and Culture

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 7, no. 3

Pages: 38–39

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Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

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