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1294 results

Report

AEL Study of KERA Implementation in Four Rural Kentucky School Districts: 1993-94 Annual Report

Available from: ERIC

Nongraded schools, ungraded

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Abstract/Notes: A 5-year qualitative study of implementation of the Kentucky Education Reform Act (KERA) analyzes the effects on four rural school districts of large-scale changes in state policy. This annual report of the project focuses on five key KERA "strands." First, KERA mandates that grades K-3 be replaced with an ungraded primary program characterized by seven "critical attributes." Developmentally appropriate practices was the most successfully implemented attribute, but dual-age grouping (the preferred multiage pattern of most schools) appeared to be acting as a barrier to continuous progress, a third attribute. With regard to the second strand--instruction, assessment, and accountability--major findings were that the state assessment program was the driving force behind most instructional changes, emphasis on writing had been increased, teachers had mixed reactions to this increased emphasis, and there was little school-wide planning and implementation of instructional changes. The

Language: English

Published: Charleston, West Virginia, Jun 1995

Article

Living Grace and Courtesy in the Primary

Available from: ERIC

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 40, no. 1

Pages: 51-61

Child development, Classroom environment, Early childhood education, Classroom environment, Social development

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Abstract/Notes: Polli Soholt looks at grace and courtesy from the 3-6 classroom perspective with clear theory explanations as they pertain to the larger classroom culture. She discusses the link between older and young children and the presence of the teacher as a model for grace and takes a brief look to neural science for proof of the existence of social interest in very young children. Polli asserts that social skills are integral to a sensitive period for social behaviors with other children and adults. She has very specific ideas about grace and courtesy presentations that aid the directress and the child in the learning process for conveying social activities. The article concludes with a concept of the "little community," where individual work can be seen in the context of how it makes a contribution to the whole community, even at an early age. [This talk was presented at the NAMTA conference titled "Grace, Courtesy, and Civility Across the Planes," Portland, OR, March 13-16, 2014.]

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Book

Think about...Multiage Classrooms: An Anthology of Original Essays.

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Abstract/Notes: Ten articles provide a detailed look at examples of real-world multiage classrooms; review the literature and research surrounding multiage groupings; explore the practical issues involved in organizing, conducting, and assessing multiage classrooms; and offer insight into the many implications of and subtleties that accompany multiage groupings. The articles are: (1) "The Little Red Schoolhouse" (Robin Fogarty); (2) "What We Do at Concrete Elementary" (Mardi B. Jones and Don Jeanroy); (3) "The Waxing and Waning of Nongradedness" (Barbara Nelson Pavan); (4) "Research in Nongraded Elementary Schools: Simple Is Beautiful" (Roberto Gutierrez and Robert E. Slavin); (5) "Reinventing School: Teachers' Perspectives on Multiage Classrooms" (David Marshak); (6) "Nongraded Education: A Report from Aspen, Colorado" (Marilyn Hughes); (7) "Instructional Strategies in a Multiage Primary Classroom" (Kathy Magee); (8) "Technology for Teaching and Learning" (Frank Betts); (9) "Critical Insights from

Language: English

Published: Arlington Heights, Illinois: IRI/Skylight Training and Publishing, Inc., 1995

ISBN: 1-57517-003-5

Book

Process Versus Content in Elementary School Science Teaching

Available from: ERIC

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Abstract/Notes: The purpose of the monograph was to determine if the process of science or the content of science should be emphasized in elementary school science teaching. The discussion attempts to show why process, and not content, should be the primary emphasis in elementary school science teaching by examining the history of elementary school science in the United States, cognitive development, and the preparation of teachers. The results indicate that educators regard the development of competence in use of the scientific method and the development of the scientific attitude the most important objectives of science instruction. Developmental psychologists such as Montessori, Piaget, and Bruner believe that child cognition is enhanced when pupils use the processes of science. Finally, there is evidence that elementary school teachers can be better trained to teach a process-oriented curriculum because it requires little understanding of the concepts and principles of science and does not require teachers to keep up to date with scientific information. (Author/BR)

Language: English

Published: Syracuse, New York: Department of Science Teaching, Syracuse University, 1973

Doctoral Dissertation

The New Education Fellowship and the Reconstruction of Education: 1945 to 1966

Available from: UCL

Educational change, Europe, New Education Fellowship, New Education Movement, Theosophical Society, Theosophy

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Abstract/Notes: During the 1920s and 1930s, the New Education Fellowship (NEF), founded in 1919, established itself as an important international force for radical education and educational experimentation. Its membership was drawn from many different countries and included some of the most prominent progressive educators of that period. By 1945, however, the movement was experiencing international decline. Membership had fallen and in many countries the new educational network had ceased to exist. This situation was a result not only of the destruction of the new educational network in Europe during the Second World War, but also of the change in the outlook of educationists and reformers who sought new solutions to the problems of the reconstruction of society and education. The purpose of this study is to explore the NEF's importance as a disseminator of educational and political ideals after 1945 and its contribution to debates about the post-war reconstruction of education and society, using the considerable but currently little-researched material held at the Institute of Education, University of London. This thesis examines the NEF's network after 1945 and considers how far the NEF successfully extended its membership amongst school teachers and educationists at teacher training colleges. The NEF also sought to develop an international network. The international activities of the NEF, both through links with other organisations, for example, the United Nations Educational, Social and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO), and its membership in those countries where the NEF maintained branches are explored in order to gauge the success of the NEF as a movement with internationalist ambitions.

Language: English

Published: London, England, 2009

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

The Current Landscape of US Children’s Television: Violent, Prosocial, Educational, and Fantastical Content

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: Journal of Children and Media, vol. 13, no. 3

Pages: 276-294

Children's mass media, Children's television programs, North America, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: The present study examined currently popular children’s television shows to determine the prevalence of violent, prosocial, educational, and fantastical content (including fantastical events and anthropomorphism). Network, style, and content ratings were collected for 88 shows using a combination of Common Sense Media and laboratory ratings applied to two randomly-selected episodes of each show. Overall, currently popular children’s television shows were most often animated and contained little violent, prosocial, or educational content, but a great deal of fantastical content. Interrelations among variables were also examined. Shows with fantastical events were both more violent and more prosocial than shows without, and shows with anthropomorphism were more prosocial than shows without. The network on which a show aired predicted violent, prosocial, and educational content, but not fantastical content. Children’s television today is not as violent as might be believed, but nor is it particularly prosocial or educational. It is highly fantastical. The implications of the landscape for children’s behavior, learning, and cognition are discussed.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1080/17482798.2019.1605916

ISSN: 1748-2798

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

L’insegnante Montessoriana e la sua Formazione / El docente montessoriano y su formación / The Montessorian Teachers and their training

Available from: Universidade de Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

Publication: RELAdEI (Revista Latinoamericana de Educación Infantil), vol. 3, no. 3

Pages: 49-57

Montessori method of education, Montessori method of education - Teacher training, Observation (Educational method), Teacher training

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Abstract/Notes: In questo contributo vengono presentati gli aspetti caratterizzanti il profilo dell’insegnante montessoriana così come viene definita dalla stessa Maria Montessori in alcuni suoi scritti e comein relazione a esso vada costruita la sua formazione. La maestra montessoriana insegna poco, osserva moltoe soprattutto ha la funzione di organizzare un ambiente idoneo adirigerele attività psichiche dei bambini Essa deve avvicinarsi a essi con umiltà e pazienza, consapevoleche sono loro i protagonisti della loro crescita. Questo atteggiamento si forma non tanto con il possesso diuna cultura pedagogica teorica quanto con l’esperienza dell’osservazione e la supervisione di maestre esperte che aiutano la futura insegnante a sostenere un lungo processo di riflessione interiore e di elevazione spirituale. / En este artículo se presentan los aspectos que caracterizan el perfil del docente, tal y como lo define María Montessori en algunos de sus escritos, y como en relación con el perfil se debe construir su formación. María Montessori afirma que el maestro enseña poco, observa mucho y tiene principalmente la función de organizar un entorno educativo adecuado para desarrollar las actividades psíquicas de los niños. Debe acercarse a ellos con humildad y paciencia, sabiendo que son los protagonistas de su crecimiento. Esta actitud no se forma tanto con la posesión de una teoría de la cultura educativa, sino con la observación y supervisión de maestros expertos que ayudan al futuro maestro a sostener un largo proceso de reflexión interior y elevación espiritual. / In this paper the aspects characterizing Montessori teacher’s profile are presented as they are defined in the Maria Montessori’s writings and how it is built their formation in connection to it. The Montessori teacher teaches little and observes much; she has to arrange a suitable environment to direct the activities of the children, she must approach them with humility and patience, aware that they are the protagonists of their own growth. This attitude derives not so much from a theoretical education culture, but from observation and supervision as well as from the expert teachers who help the future teacher to support a long process of inner reflection and spiritual elevation.

Language: Italian

ISSN: 2255-0666

Article

'We Had to Be Sneaky!' Powerful Glimpses into Imaginary Expression in Montessori Classrooms

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 22, no. 4

Pages: 18-25

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: This study examines life in a Montessori classroom, with special attention focused on spontaneous episodes of imaginary play. The goal is to better understand what is going on when children engage in imaginary play and how this play assists young learners in their development. This article examines three play episodes, each from a different area of the classroom. A link is established between the value of play in young children's learning and development and the ways in which young children make sense of and experience play in a Montessori classroom. The results of this study suggest that imaginary play occurs as a social activity embedded within interactions with friends. In particular, as children depict imaginary worlds while dialoguing with the materials, they practice interpersonal cooperation and role-taking skills. Although superheroes and pop stars were not invited into a Montessori school, the children found surrogates to express their feelings and needs, and they looked to their classmates in these little scenarios for an endorsement of their ideas.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Good Books to Support Children's Research

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 18, no. 2

Pages: 53-60

Book reviews, Mary Maher Boehnlein - Writings, ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Reviews several "little" books that can provide material for children's research based on the Montessori Time Lines and classification charts for geography, plants, and animals. Suggests classroom activities to support the beginning reader's curiosity. (HTH)

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

Peace: A Feeling You Have in Your Heart

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 18, no. 3

Pages: 30-31

Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Elementary education, Montessori method of education, Peace, Peace education, Teachers, ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: The author believes that very young children are able to understand the abstract concept of peace. In her primary classroom she introduces the concept of peace to the children in a low energy environment with low lights, and soft music. When children feel at peace in their hearts, they relate peacefully to those around them. She begins with the dove, a concrete object and an internationally known symbol of peace. Children relate well to animals, and the dove, is a fragile bird. The children all sit together, and pass the dove around. Impressed with the way the children respond to the dove ceremony, and how respectful they are of the dove, the author has begun to extend this and has now incorporated the dove symbol into other areas of the classroom. She cut a dove shape out of sandpaper for a rubbing activity. She created a 1 to 10 dove counting game, and added doves to the big and little sorting lesson. The goal is for her students to expand this lesson of peace outside the classroom, into the world. She does this when introducing a new country by helping students see it through the eyes of a child who lives there. Through these "travels" students not only receive a geography lesson, as they discover the differences and similarities of students in other countries, but they get a life lesson as well.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

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