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609 results

Article

Montessori: Closed or Open-Ended

Publication: Bulletin of the American Montessori Teachers

Pages: 5-6

Americas, North America, United States of America

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Language: English

Doctoral Dissertation

A Single-Subject Multiple Baseline and Feminist Intertextual Deconstruction of Gender Differences Among Kindergartners in Learning the Alphabet Using Clay and a Tactual/Kinesthetic Multiple Intelligence and Montessori Pedagogy

Available from: Texas Tech University

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Abstract/Notes: This multimethod study involved quantitative procedures to measure to what extent a tactual/kinesthetic art approach using clay would help low achieving or developmentally delayed kindergarten students learn the alphabet (a pre-reading skill). Data collected at each session ranged from twenty to twenty-five meetings per child over a period of ten weeks occurred within a single subject, multiple baseline design. Qualitative data collection and analysis revealed differences in participants' reactions to, preferences for, and processes with clay such as expressing their lives, dreams, stories, beliefs, and fears. Analysis of social interactions, student self-initiated practices, and variations of the interventions (i.e., clay play personifying letters, ABC book, songs, associations, images on cards, and artworks) suggested that gender differences occurred more strongly when clothing differentiated gender, and in the types of stories told, but not in the clay processes initiated. I began the study with 18 participants, selected by their teachers, using the criterion that the student could not identify more than 17 alphabet letters. The findings are based on the 10 remaining students who were not able to name more than 17 letters after five baseline sessions. The baseline sessions consisted of recording students' recognition of lower-case alphabet letters. If a child did not recognize a letter, I implemented the tactual/kinesthetic clay instruction, a multiple intelligences pedagogical approach influenced by Montessori methods. The intervention of forming with clay was implemented at staggered times across groups of letters (three letters at a time) for each participant. The participant's recognition of the distinctive features of a letter demonstrated progress in learning a new letter. An intervention of a tactual/kinesthetic art approach using clay did improve all of the participant's abilities to recognize, learn, and remember letters. The findings support the theory that kinesthetic/tactile perception is a primary channel for early learning. In spite of the apparent importance of kinesthetic methods, multisensory learning, and manipulative materials, few programs that incorporate kinesthetic/tactile pedagogy. Interdisciplinary arts-based teaching addresses the multiple intelligences of individual children and their different learning styles.

Language: English

Published: Lubbock, Texas, 2002

Article

Sharing and Caring

Publication: Montessori Courier, vol. 5, no. 2

Pages: 14–15, 22

⛔ No DOI found

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Language: English

ISSN: 0959-4108

Article

Early years education in Germany and Ireland: a study of provision and curricular implementation in two unique environments [Enseignement precoce en Allemagne et en Irlande: une etude de la realisation des besoins et du programme scolaire dans deux environnements uniques / Educación en los primeros años en Alemania e Irlanda: un estudio de disposicisn e implementatión curricular en dos ambientes únicos]

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: International Journal of Early Years Education, vol. 3, no. 3

Pages: 51-67

Europe, Germany, Ireland, Northern Europe, Western Europe

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Abstract/Notes: This paper highlights the differences and similarities between a Kindergarten outside Bremen in Lower Saxony, Germany and a Primary School Junior Infant Class in County Cork, Republic of Ireland. Both are concerned with the education of the young child but whereas the Kindergarten is attended by three to six year olds, the Junior Infant Class caters almost exclusively for four to five year old children. A case study account of both groups is given and an analysis of the activities which took place in each using the ‘Target Child Observational Schedule’ [Sylva et al., (1980)] is presented in bar‐graph form. The paper concludes that Erzieherinnen, Kinderpflegerinnen and Junior Infant Class teachers need to engage in more interaction with the children in order, in particular, to raise the frequency and quality of linguistic interaction. An increase in the structure of the children's play would help to enhance cognitive development. [Cet article souligne les differences et les similitudes entre un Jardin d'Enfants en Basse Saxonie, près de Brème (Allemagne) et une classe maternelle dans le comtè de Cork (République d'Irlande). Les deux établissements sont charges de l'éducation de jeunes enfants, mais tandis que les élèves du Jardin d'Enfants sont ages d'entre trois et six ans, la classe de maternelle ne s ‘occupe pratiquement exclusivement que d'enfants de quatre a six ans. On donnera un compte‐rendu de l'étude de cas faite sur les deux groupes, ainsi qu'une presentation sous forme de graphique en barres de l'analyse des activites proposées de part et d'autre, basée sur le Programme d'observation cible de l'enfant du Professeur Kathy Sylva (1980). En conclusion, nous avancerons que les Erzieherinnen, les Kinderpflegerin et les enseignants de la classe maternelle doiventfaire preuve de davantage d'interaction avec les enfants afin, en particulier, d'élever le niveau auquel de tels enfants parlent. Une structuration accrue des activites ludiques des enfants aurait également pour résultat un développement cognitif plus rapide. / Este ensayo trata de las diferencias y semejanzas entre un prescolar en la baja Sajonia, en las afueras de Bremen, Alemania, y una Clase Junior Infantil en la Escuela Primaria del Condado de Cork, en la República de Irlanda. Los dos sistemas se ocupan de la education de niños en la primera infancia pero, mientras que el prescolar se ocupa de niños entre las edades de tres y seis años, la Clase Junior Infantil se dedica casi exclusivamente a los niños de cuatro a cinco anos de edad. Este papel describe un caso particular de cada uno de estos dos grupos asi como de las actividades que tuvieron lugar en cada uno de ellos, utilizando Target Child Observational Schedule (1980) de Kathy Sylva, y que se presentan a manera de gráfica de barras. Es estudio llega a la conclusion de que los educadores de Erzieherinnen, Kinderpflegerin y de las Clases Infantiles Junior necesitan aumentar la interactión con el niho para elevar, especialmente, el nivel en el que estos nihos hablan. Un incremento en la estuctura del juego de los nihos también resultaria en la mejora del desarrollo cognitivo.]

Language: English

DOI: 10.1080/0966976950030303

ISSN: 0966-9760

Article

Fort Play: Children Recreate Recess

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 19, no. 3

Pages: 20-30

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Recess beckons well before it actually arrives. Its allure can be heard in children's lunchtime conversations as they discuss imaginary roles, plans, alliances and teams, with an obvious appetite for play and its unbounded possibility. For some children, recess provides the most important reasons to come to school. In team sports, games of chase and tag, clique-bound conversations, solitary wandering and exploration, pretend and war play, recess offers reliable access to a scarce resource of immense value in the lives of children: spontaneous self-direction. Although watched over by the protective though generally unobtrusive gaze of supervising teachers, children at recess interact with their natural environment and with each other as they choose--a freedom denied them at other times while at school, and increasingly in their homes and neighborhood. As a lower elementary teacher at Lexington Montessori School (LMS) in Lexington, MA, from 1994 through 2002, the author witnessed for eight years the development of an extraordinary child-centered and spontaneous world of recess play (Powell, 2007). As children entered the elementary program at LMS, their peers initiated them into a culture of fort building. The forts, built entirely from sticks, leaves, and found objects from the surrounding woods, were the sites of considerable experimentation with different forms and rules of social organization and various styles of construction. They were also the vehicles for much of the conflict that occurred at the school. Children negotiated and clashed over ownership of land and resources and argued about the rules and roles of fort play and whether the rights of those already identified with a structure outweighed the rights of outsiders to be included. In doing so, they developed and influenced each other's reasoning about such moral principles as benevolence, justice, and reciprocity. Fort play was unpredictable, immediate, exciting, and fun, a brief window of opportunity,among hours of mostly adult-inspired activities and expectations, in which these children were free to manage their own lives and interact with each other on their own terms. As in the case of other schools where fort play has flourished, the LMS forts were in no way a programmed activity but rather a spontaneous one that simply wasn't stopped.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Yoga For Montessorians

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 26, no. 3

Pages: 50-54

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: When the author tells someone who does not do yoga that she is a yoga teacher, she often hears that they could not possibly do yoga. The most common reasons they give for this are: "I am really not flexible! I really don't like stretching!" and "Oh, but I wouldn't be any good at yoga!" Smith explains that, contrary to popular belief, yoga is not actually about being flexible; yoga is about learning to be one's healthiest, calmest, wisest, most free, strongest, and best possible self. Yoga, a Sanskrit word often translated as "union," aims to unify all aspects of one's being, and, by doing so, to help each of us know our true self. The work done in the Montessori classroom is very physical, there is constant motion, and because of this, many Montessori teachers suffer from knee, ankle, and lower-back problems. And yet, even a very basic physical yoga practice can help them learn to sit, stand, and kneel in a way that decreases the likelihood of long-term injury and pain. If someone would like to give yoga a try, this article presents a short practice intended for beginners. Practice can begin using the pictures provided herein, however, nothing can replace taking class with a live instructor.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Five Questions

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 27, no. 4

Pages: 14

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Abstract/Notes: In the future, I hope to offer scholarships to students from low-income families.Starting a school is a learning experience, and it opened my eyes to challenges that Montessori heads of schools and educators face: finding teachers, maintaining the authenticity of the Montessori environment while meeting the required state laws for preschool, and running a successful business.In starting a Montessori school, I found that a big obstacle is finding well-prepared Montessori teachers who would be at ease with a salary that is lower than, say, a public school kindergarten teacher's salary.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

School Accreditation News

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 27, no. 2

Pages: 20

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Abstract/Notes: AMS accreditation is a designation that an AMS member school meets a well-defined standard of excellence.ALEXANDER GRAHAM BELL MONTESSORI SCHOOL, WHEELING, IL (Newly accredited) Debra Trude-Suter, Head of School BUFFALO GROVE MONTESSORI SCHOOL, BUFFALO GROVE, IL (Reaccredited) Deborah LaPorte, Head of School CRYSTAL LAKE MONTESSORI SCHOOL, WOODSTOCK, IL (Reaccredited) Pamela Zirko, Head of School GREENBROOK MONTESSORI SCHOOL, HANOVER PARK, IL (Newly accredited) Deborah LaPorte, Head of School SETON MONTESSORI SCHOOL, CLARENDON HILLS, IL (Reaccredited) Jennifer Nolan, Head of School TOBIN MONTESSORI SCHOOL, CAMBRIDGE (Newly accredited at the Lower Elementary and Upper Elementary levels)* Martha Mosman, Head of School * Accredited with nontraditional Montessori age groupings.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Bright Ideas

Publication: Montessori International, vol. 89

Pages: 26

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Abstract/Notes: bird and flower puzzles, fishing knots, hammering tees, yoga book, lock-up ban, cooking cards

Language: English

ISSN: 1470-8647

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