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703 results

Article

Questionnaire to Hertzberger; Montessori School at Delft

Publication: A+U: Architecture and Urbanism, no. 75

Pages: 40-43, 71-74

Architecture, Delft Montessori School (Netherlands), Europe, Herman Hertzberger - Works, Holland, Netherlands, Western Europe

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Language: Japanese, English

ISSN: 0389-9160

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

The Effects of Reviewing a School’s Mission and Vision on Teacher Stress

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

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Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this study was to see what effect reviewing a school’s mission and vision would have on teacher stress in an urban, public charter Montessori school located in the Midwest. Four teachers participated in this research over the course of three weeks. Teachers were given laminated notecards containing the school’s mission and vision statements and were asked to read the notecards throughout their days and to log when they read these notecards. Teachers completed pre and post-intervention attitude scales to gauge perceived stress levels. Teachers were invited to take notes throughout the intervention, and I wrote a narrative describing a typical morning. At the end of the three weeks, I conducted interviews with each participating teacher. Reviewing the school’s mission and vision did not have a significant impact on teacher stress. Teachers expressed a high level of stress and had difficulty finding effective coping strategies for dealing with this stress. Highly stressed myself, I made the decision to leave my teaching position at the end of the academic year.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2016

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

Gender and Collaborative Writing

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

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Abstract/Notes: This action research report investigated whether all boy collaboration groups improve the writing skills and attitudes in primary aged boys. The study included an all male writing group, a mixed gender writing group, and an all female writing group in a small, rural Montessori Academy in a classroom with 21 students ranging in Grades 1 through 3. Students were instructed on how to collaborate and work appropriately with one another before beginning writing in their groups assigned by gender for six weeks. While students worked in their groups the researcher observed behaviors, scored entries, conferenced with students, and administered surveys regarding writing pre and post intervention. Students, male and female, had an overall positive attitude towards writing before intervention and maintained their positive attitudes post intervention. Results showed that the mixed gender group demonstrated the highest improvements in writing skills, but participated in the lowest amount of collaboration. The results of the study suggested that collaboration could have been an effective tool for males, but not a consistent method for other students. Based on the results of the study, it is suggested that all students participate in mixed gender groups.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2016

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

Relevant Professional Development: Reflective of Adult Learning Styles

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

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Abstract/Notes: This action research project was instigated to determine the effects of professional development (PD) for practicing Montessori teachers using the Montessori Language materials. The specific targeted materials included: vocabulary cards, sound analysis, sandpaper letters, moveable alphabet, pencil use, and reading. The research took place during a four week period in a large west coast Montessori school that serves children between 18 months and 12 years old. The teachers who participated in the study all worked with children between the ages of 3 – 6 years old. The data was collected using a provider journal (notes taken by the researcher during the PD sessions), questionnaires and weekly teacher logs. The researcher used available PD literature to plan and execute the study, which highlighted the importance of teachers participating in PD that was designed around participant identified content. The literature also provided guidance as to the content methods to incorporate into the PD sessions. At the conclusion of the study, findings revealed that the teachers benefited from support in all the language categories listed. They also became aware of the content delivery methods that best met their individual needs. Future research is needed to determine the content and delivery needs of teachers in different stages of their careers.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2016

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

Using Mindfulness to Self-Regulate in the Upper Elementary Classroom

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research, Upper elementary

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Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this research was to determine the effects on students’ ability to self regulate while learning about daily mindfulness lessons. The study took place over the course of six weeks in an upper elementary class of 20 students, including four fourth graders, nine fifth graders, and seven sixth graders. The study was conducted in a rural public Montessori school in the Midwest. Students participated in a six-week mindfulness unit from The Mind Up Curriculum (The Hawn Foundation, 2011). The researcher collected data through a pre-and postassessment, students’ self reflections and graphs, researcher’s observation, and researcher’s daily journal. The data suggested students, when given mindfulness lessons, could become more selfregulated. From pre and post assessment, there was a 170% growth in the number of students who would like to use mindfulness techniques in their future. Although the numbers increased, further research could demonstrate effects of mindfulness lessons for on-task behavior and selfregulation over a longer period of time.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2017

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

Goal Setting and Choice on Student Motivation

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research, Americas, Goal (Psychology), Motivation (Psychology), North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this research is to determine what effect weekly conferences and goal setting opportunities have on the motivation of kindergarten children, in a multi-age (3-6 year-old) Montessori early childhood classroom in the Midwest. The goal was for children to become selfmotivated to choose and practice independent work that is developmentally appropriate. Data was collected before, during, and after the project using an observational checklist to determine the effectiveness of implementing goal setting and conferences with students. The research showed that writing goals in a journal was helpful for the majority of students. The students involved in the study came into the classroom ready to choose the lessons that were written in their journal. Also witnessed was an increase in positive talk and encouragement throughout the classroom. The students were reassuring each other and checked on one another to see how close they were to meeting their goals. Future research could be done to determine if goal setting could be carried over into the home and further research into intrinsic motivation of children would be helpful.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2017

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

Effects of Grading on Student Learning and Alternative Assessment Strategies

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

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Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this study was to investigate what effect an alternative assessment strategy would have on students’ engagement, motivation, and overall learning in an urban, private Montessori middle school program located in the Midwest. Two teachers and 13 students participated in two phases (one social studies and one science unit) over the course of six weeks. Teacher-assigned grades on class and homework were removed and replaced with student-determined final grades based on self-assessment using collaboratively created rubrics and individual portfolios. Students kept daily learning logs and completed a pre- and post-unit survey designed to measure their level of engagement, motivation, and learning preferences. The researcher kept daily observational notes as well as tallies of behavioral markers for engagement and disengagement. Students were also invited to give open-ended feedback about their experience at the end of the intervention. The results showed that while the alternative assessment model did not have a direct impact on students’ daily engagement or intrinsic motivation, it did increase students’ understanding of how their work correlated to a final grade in the unit, and it created opportunities for students to make connections to their learning and thus more actively plan their future work. Additionally, a direct correlation appeared between the level of student activity and student engagement in classes, indicating the importance of reducing passivity as much as possible in the daily learning process.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2017

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

The Effects of Record-Keeping on Teacher Self-Efficacy and Student Self-Regulation in the Primary Montessori Classroom

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

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Abstract/Notes: This paper examines the effects of teacher use of an online record-keeping system on teacher self-efficacy and student self-regulation behavior. Four teachers and thirty-four students between the ages of three and six years old participated in this seven-week study in one of the few Montessori schools in a Latin American capital city. Pre- and post-study data collection methods included a teacher self-efficacy questionnaire and small group discussion, as well as use of the Head-to-Toe Test, a means of measuring children’s self-regulation behavior. For seven weeks, teachers used the program Transparent Classroom to record lessons, inform their lesson presentations, and track overall student progress. Through weekly classroom observations, child behaviors hindering and encouraging normalization were tracked with a tally sheet. Data showed increases in both teacher self-efficacy and student self-regulation, especially in children with the lowest pre-study scores, who saw dramatic gains. These results show the use of a record-keeping system may be a means of increasing achievement and satisfaction in both students and teachers.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2018

Article

Miniaturstadt: Montessori College Oost; Schul(t) räume

Publication: AIT, no. 5

Pages: 77-83, 122-126

Architecture, Europe, Herman Hertzberger - Works, Holland, Montessori College Oost (Amsterdam), Netherlands, Western Europe, ⛔ No DOI found

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Language: Dutch

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

The Impact of Read Aloud with Socratic Discussion on the Literacy and Critical Thinking Skills of the Elementary Student

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

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Abstract/Notes: This study aims to uncover a link between read aloud with Socratic discussion and its impact on literacy and critical thinking skills. In researching this relationship, both quantitative and qualitative data tools were used. Participants in the study included 60 students from a charter Montessori school in the Southwest United States ranging from grade 1 to 6. Students participated in a six-week intervention. The intervention included a 60-minute read aloud with Socratic discussion session conducted twice a week. The findings indicate that there is a general increase in literacy and reading comprehension skills. In addition, the study was also shown to have a significant impact on individual participation and critical thinking skills as it relates to themes of the book. The conclusion of the study recommends more research with varied communities and book choices. In the future we must find ways to stimulate critical thinking skills in the elementary child using relatable themes and critical questioning.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2020

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