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723 results

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Montessori-Pädagogik in der Musiklehrer*innenbildung?! Musikdidaktische Betrachtungen eines Seminarkonzepts samt Materialsammlung

Available from: Die Materialwerkstatt

Publication: Die Materialwerkstatt. Zeitschrift für Konzepte und Arbeitsmaterialien für Lehrer*innenbildung und Unterricht., vol. 4, no. 2

Pages: 61-71

Montessori method of education

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Abstract/Notes: Der Beitrag stellt ein an Grundprinzipien der Montessori-Pädagogik angelehntes Seminarkonzept der Musiklehrer*innenbildung für den Primarbereich vor. Dafür werden die Besonderheiten der Montessoriglocken und ihre Einsatzmöglichkeiten für musikalisch-ästhetische Wahrnehmungs- und Produktionsprozesse thematisiert, denn die Potenziale für das Experimentieren mit und Erfinden von Musik mit Montessoriglocken sind bislang in Lehr-Lernmaterialien nicht ausgeführt worden. Vielmehr standen Aspekte der Musiktheorie im Vordergrund (Wilms, 2010).

Language: German

DOI: 10.11576/dimawe-4903

ISSN: 2629-5598

Master's Thesis (M.S. Ed.)

Including Sensory Integration Materials in a Montessori Classroom to Improve Behavior Outcomes

Available from: American Montessori Society

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Abstract/Notes: The Montessori Children’s House includes a variety of materials to meet the many different needs of children in the classroom. However, some children exhibit challenging behaviors in the classroom that make it difficult for them to attend to and complete work. These behaviors also disrupt the other children that are working and engaged in the classroom. The child who exhibits challenging behavior requires extra attention from the teacher, making it difficult for him/her to be independent and develop positive peer relationships. Sensory integration was defined by Jean Ayres as “the neurological process that organizes sensation from one’s own body and from the environment and makes it possible to use the body effectively within the environment” (Ayres 1972, p. 11). Research has shown that sensory integration materials such as fidgets, mouth tools, rocking and bouncing tools, and noise blocking headphones help to calm children and improve focus in classrooms. In this case study of two children within a classroom of 25, we measured undesirable behaviors before and after the introduction of sensory integration materials. We also tracked the usage of the sensory integration materials by all of the children in the classroom. The data collected showed that over a period of seven weeks, the inclusion of these materials produced a slight improvement in behaviors of the two children in the case study. The study also showed that children in the classroom regularly utilized the sensory integration materials to help them focus on work in the classroom. While future study can expand on this work, based on the findings of the introductory research presented here, including sensory integration materials in the Montessori Children’s House can reduce challenging behaviors and help children self-regulate so that they can better focus on classroom work.

Language: English

Published: River Falls, Wisconsin, 2018

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Materials and Methods in Reading: The Montessori Approach

Publication: Education (Boston), vol. 85

Pages: 468

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Language: English

ISSN: 0013-1172

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

The Montessori Theory in the “No Schoolbag” Model. Formativity of Materials and of the Educational Environment

Available from: Università di Bologna

Publication: Ricerche di Pedagogia e Didattica / Journal of Theories and Research in Education, vol. 16, no. 2

Pages: 93-104

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Abstract/Notes: The aim of this contribution is to show the “outdated” relevance of Montessori pedagogy in the “No Schoolbag” (Senza Zaino, or “SZ”) model. Adopting some fundamental elements of Montessori’s activism, this model advocates a school in the fullest meaning of Scholè, as a place for dialogue, development and work, otium and negotium, commitment to study and the pleasure of knowledge, where the discipline of freedom, as applied to experience and filtered by emotions, is indispensable. In doing so, it rejects the idea of school being based on educational intellectualism. Rather it is an indirect educational path in which the experience of reality, rather than empty words, shapes the child's mind, developing an inner order that originates from its external counterpart, with the result that the child feels like an active participant, belonging to a welcoming, hospitable and motivating community. Drawing on the Montessori theory, the “No Schoolbag” model positions itself as a pedagogy of our time, but endowed with an ancient, rigorous, inclusive, and supportive heart.

Language: English

DOI: 10.6092/issn.1970-2221/12199

ISSN: 1970-2221

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

A Failed Circulation: The Montessori Method and Teaching Materials in Republican China (1912-1949)

Available from: DOAJ

Publication: Revista Tempos e Espaços em Educação, vol. 11, no. 26

Pages: 77-90

Asia, China, East Asia, Montessori method of education - History

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Abstract/Notes: Montessori method arrived in China at the time when Chinese scholars wanted to established Chinese version kindergartens with modern and scienti c teaching method and tools. rough translation and expert coming to China, Chinese scholars introduced Montessori thought into China. However, the study on Montessori method only stopped at the step of translating Montessori’s theory and trying to reshape the didactic materials. In spite of two short-lived success examples in the 1920s and 1930s, it was never large-scale applied in China. Except the expensive of the didactic tools, lacking spokesman and teachers were the main reason for the failure of the method.

Language: English

DOI: 10.20952/revtee.v11i26.9011

ISSN: 2358-1425

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Finished and Unfinished Objects: Supporting Children's Creativity Through Materials

Available from: ScienceDirect

Publication: Procedia: Social and Behavioral Sciences, vol. 51

Pages: 721-727

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Language: English

DOI: 10.1016/j.sbspro.2012.08.231

ISSN: 1877-0428

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Materials and (Language) Learning Environment Based on Montessori Concepts

Available from: LLT Journal

Publication: LLT Journal: A Journal on Language and Language Teaching, vol. 21, no. 1

Pages: 46-54

Children with disabilities, Classroom environments, Inclusive education, Maria Montessori - Philosophy, Montessori materials, Montessori method of education, People with disabilities, Prepared environment

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Abstract/Notes: Montessori Education is widely spread in almost all countries in the world. Even though this school is meant for all kinds of learners including “normal” learners, the Montessori education concepts used in Montessori schools will be very supportive education for children with special needs. Therefore, the schools which adopt Montessori education concepts can facilitate inclusion, especially with the concepts of ‘I can do it myself.’ Inclusive education needs to be carefully prepared and implemented by schools. The movement brings about some challenges for teachers. This paper explores the environment and materials based on Montessori education concepts. The environment and materials are suitable for all types of learners and thus can be an option to be implemented in the inclusive education setting. Teaching materials rooted in Montessori education concepts indeed cater all ages and embrace the needs of all students. DOI: doi.org/10.24071/llt.2018.210105

Language: English

DOI: 10.24071/llt.2018.210105

ISSN: 2579-9533

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

An Intervention Study: Removing Supplemented Materials from Montessori Classrooms Associated with Better Child Outcomes

Available from: University of Kansas Libraries

Publication: Journal of Montessori Research, vol. 2, no. 1

Pages: 16-26

Americas, Montessori materials, Montessori method of education - Evaluation, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Montessori classrooms vary a good deal in implementation, and one way in which implementation differs is the provision of materials.  Specifically, some classrooms use only Montessori materials, whereas others supplement the Montessori materials with commercially available materials like puzzles and games.  A prior study suggested this might be a reason for observed differences across studies and classrooms (Author, 2012) but an intervention study is the best test.  The present study presents such an intervention with 52 children in 3 Montessori classrooms with Supplementary materials. All children were given 6 pretests, and non-Montessori materials were removed from 2 of the classrooms.  Four months later, children were retested to see how much they changed across that period.  Children in the classrooms from which the non-Montessori materials were removed advanced significantly more in early reading and executive function, and to some degree advanced more in early math.  There were no differences across the classroom types in amount of change on the tests of vocabulary, social knowledge, or social skills.

Language: English

DOI: 10.17161/jomr.v2i1.5678

ISSN: 2378-3923

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Implications of Instructional Materials on Oral Skills Among Early Childhood Learners in Central Zone, Kisumu County, Kenya

Available from: Journal Issues

Publication: International Journal of Educational Policy Research and Review, vol. 3, no. 2

Pages: 20-28

Africa, East Africa, Kenya, Montessori materials, Sub-Saharan Africa

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Abstract/Notes: This study was conducted in Kenya and focused on the use of instructional materials at the Early Childhood level. Purpose of the study was to establish the implications of instructional materials on oral skills among early childhood learners. The study adopted descriptive survey design. The target population comprised 42 head teachers, 126 teachers and 3180 leaners. It was found that that teaching using instructional materials improved the performance of learners in various learning activities such as repetition of letters, repetition of words and ability to write dictated words. The improved performance was in a range of 11% to 18%.

Language: English

DOI: 10.15739/IJEPRR.16.004

ISSN: 2360-7076

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

On the Edge Between Digital and Physical: Materials to Enhance Creativity in Children. An Application to Atypical Development

Available from: Frontiers in Psychology

Publication: Frontiers in Psychology, vol. 11

Pages: Article 755

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Abstract/Notes: The 4 P’s creativity model (person, process, press, and product) underlines how creativity is strongly connected with the materials employed to conceive and realize a creative outcome. As a multiform construct, it invites a wide variety of approaches to the study of it. One of the most promising ways to address this issue is to connect it with cognitive development and related educational pathways, as creativity can be enhanced and stimulated in every child, leading to an improvement both at personal and societal level. Even if creativity is recognized and highly valued, there is still a lack of methods which can stimulate creativity in an effective way. Useful hints may come from the outstanding contributions of Piaget and Montessori who underlined that interaction with the physical world is a fundamental building block for cognitive development. In this paper, starting from these fixed points, we describe some creativity enhancing methods for children which give importance to the edge between digital and physical materials. Digital materials open new ways to the use and integration of physical materials with hybrid platforms which can be used in educational contexts. Together with this perspective we provide a description of the application of these methodologies to enhance creativity in children with Autistic Spectrum Disorder.

Language: English

DOI: 10.3389/fpsyg.2020.00755

ISSN: 1664-1078

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