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93 results

Article

Bringing Montessori to the Black Community: A Private School Model

Publication: NAMTA Quarterly, vol. 6, no. 2

Pages: 13-17

African American community, African Americans, Americas, North America, Montessori schools, North America, United States of America

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Language: English

Article

Let's Change the Conversation about Africa

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 32, no. 4

Pages: 34-37

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: [...]the first time I saw a wild animal in person was at a Ugandan zoo at the age of 12. The Baganda people (as well as the people of other African ethnic groups) attach great importance, pride, and respect to their king and kingdoms, as well as to regional leaders called chiefs. Invite individuals to your classroom to share cultural artifacts, languages, clothing, food, music, and anything else that will enrich children's understanding of the African continent and its people and expand their worldview Now, 8 years into my career as a Montessori teacher, I am lucky that I have the platform and the tools to help young children appreciate and celebrate cultural diversity. While it's true that the African continent is home to a number of major national parks, with some of the world's most fascinating animals, especially the "Big Five" (lion, leopard, rhinoceros, elephant, and Cape buffalo), reducing an entire continent to just animals is a dangerous distortion of perspective for curious young minds.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

Peer Tutoring and Cooperative Groups in the Dual Language Classroom

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

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Abstract/Notes: How do we help children practice and retain the second language in a Dual Language program? We must find effective and fun ways, like Peer Tutoring and Cooperative Groups. This research was conducted with a group of 21 six and seven year olds in a Dual Language Immersion classroom in a Title 1 school. There was a mixture of boys and girls, Latinos, African-Americans and Caucasians. Data collection was done through surveys, observations, artifacts and narratives. The data showed that while these strategies did increase vocabulary, they did not inspire the children to speak more Spanish. They still reverted back to speaking in English. Based on my findings, students require more vocabulary and would benefit from more opportunities to practice it.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2016

Article

John McDermott and the Road to Montessori Public Schools

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 26, no. 3

Pages: 46-49

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: In this article, the author states that, for over 45 years, she has explored the issues of leadership and change, and, along the way, she has examined how diversity fits in with these ideas. She states that she found all three of these concepts embodied in the person of John McDermott, a leader in the American Montessori movement in the United States. McDermott helped establish the framework for putting Montessori education into an American cultural context. His message was always the need for public education, the necessity of embracing African-Americans and the poor in Montessori schools, and the damage to cities caused by white flight. McDermott held to his view that the quality of public education was key to the future of the republic. He decried the economic and social disparity between poor urban and inner-city schools and those of the affluent middle class, along with the ever-widening gap between the poor and the affluent and between blacks, Latinos, and whites. McDermott continued to stress the need to make Montessori education relevant to present problems, although he did not view Montessori education as a single solution to the problems in American education. He challenged the American Montessori Society to examine the ways in which growth and change occur in America.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Administrating Language: The Language Ideological Voices of Urban School Administrators in Urban Education

Available from: SAGE Journals

Publication: Urban Education

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Abstract/Notes: Urban schools are becoming increasingly linguistically diverse. However, principals are not adequately prepared to address linguistic variation, and in particular, issues related to African American Language (AAL). This study explores the language ideological voices of urban school administrators. Focus group sessions were conducted with 15 administrators of predominantly African American schools about the function of AAL in their students’ lives. Participants demonstrated variation in views toward AAL and struggled to name the language. These discussions were mediated by multiple, even competing, language ideologies, as they attempted to converse about the use of AAL in schools.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1177/0042085920959136

ISSN: 0042-0859

Doctoral Dissertation

An Exploratory Study on the Effectiveness of Montessori Constructs and Traditional Teaching Methodology as Change Agents to Increase Academic Achievement of Elementary Black Students

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

Academic achievement, African American children, African American community, Americas, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Black students consistently underachieve academically in comparison to White students. To minimize the achievement gap between Black students and White students, some experts advocate the use of differentiated instruction as an alternative methodology to teach underachieving students. Differentiated instruction is predicated on teaching students based on their learning abilities and/or learning preferences. The differentiated instructional model examined in this study combined traditional teaching methodology with specific Montessori stage two and stage three constructs. This exploratory qualitative study examined the impact that Montessori constructs combined with traditional teaching methods had on academic achievement of Black students in grades four and five in an inner city school in Dallas County, Texas. The study further explored the sample’s perceptions of and preferences for the combined teaching methodology. The sample group had been exposed to the differentiated teaching model evaluated in the study. Disaggregated 2007 and 2008 TAKS results from the Texas Education Agency were obtained to compare the school’s fourth and fifth grade Black students’ achievement to their cohort groups in the district and in the state. The TAKS data comparisons found variability in performance among the groups in each of the subject areas assessed by TAKS. Qualitative data from a Likert Scale, multiple choice questions, questionnaires, written essay, and interviews were obtained from the participants to examine the students’ perceptions of and preferences for the combined teaching methodology. Data responses were analyzed and themes were developed to determine black students’ preferences for teaching, learning, and factors that contribute to learning. The findings of this study imply that future use of a differentiated instructional model that combines traditional teaching methodology and specific Montessori constructs and principles might be effective in improving Black student achievement.

Language: English

Published: Minneapolis, Minnesota, 2009

Doctoral Dissertation

Égwú Àmàlà: Women in Traditional Performing Arts in Ogbaruland

Available from: University of Pittsburgh ETD

Africa, Indigenous communities, Indigenous peoples, Sub-Saharan Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa, West Africa

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Abstract/Notes: Within the complex dynamics of gender relationships and roles among African peoples, women often exercise power through song and dance. Such is the case among the women of Ogbaruland in southern Nigeria who, in their performance of the dance drama Égwú Àmàlà , act as custodians of knowledge and tradition and as transmitters of culture.Apart from being a repository of information about artistic traditions, the genre also documents and enacts the history and culture of the Ogbaru people. Égwú Àmàlà, which is the subject of my dissertation, is the most popular of all Ogbaru women dance genres. The term Égwú Àmàlà literally means "paddle dance" or "paddle drama," but it is often referred to as the "mermaid dance" or égwú mmili, that is, "water dance" because of its ritualistic associations with Onye-mmili, the water divinity. This genre is predominantly performed by women of all ages, with men playing secondary roles such as òpì(gourd horn) player and paddlers of canoes when the genre is performed in the river setting. My study of Égwú Àmàlà will add to a small but growing body of literature demonstrating how gender, a locus classicus for debates in contemporary scholarship, relates to other domains of culture such as musical performance, and how gender constructions can be articulated as well as negotiated in the genre and through the performing arts in general. Since the origin and performance of Égwú Àmàlà revolves around rituals and water, this dissertation also discusses the religious dimensions of the genre, stressing the importance of water to the dance, to the Ogbaru people and to African traditional religion as well. Considering the fact that women have for decades preserved Égwú Àmàlà, which epitomizes the culture and traditions of the Ogbaru people, the present investigation represents a significant contribution to ethnomusicological, gender, and cultural studies. [Excerpt: "With the ecclesiastical permission of the Holy See, Mother Mary Magdalen Charles Walker left her home country of Ireland in response to the request of Bishop Joseph Shanahan to serve the people of God in Calabar, southern Nigeria. Her focus was the education of children and helping to improve the lives of women in the area. She established the first Montessori School in Calabar – Convent school, which became an exemplary educational institution in West Africa." p. 54]

Language: English

Published: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 2008

Book Section

From Montessori to Culturally Relevant Schools Under the Trees in Kenya

Available from: Springer Link

Book Title: Common Characteristics and Unique Qualities in Preschool Programs: Global Perspectives in Early Childhood Education

Pages: 23-35

Africa, Culturally relevant pedagogy, East Africa, Kenya, Sub-Saharan Africa

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Abstract/Notes: Kenya distinguishes itself from other sub-Saharan African countries with its well-established system of early childhood development and education (ECDE). This chapter describes environmental, economic and social-cultural circumstances in Kenya and how these affect ECDE program design, curriculum and preschool activities. The author will provide a brief historical overview of early childhood educational contexts in Kenya and how preschool teachers meet minimum standards of a quality program using Guidelines for Early Childhood Development in Kenya (NACECE (National Center for Early Childhood Education). (2003). Guidelines for early childhood development in Kenya. Nairobi: Author.) with an African approach. Specific focus will be given to the diverse and contrasting program settings for early childhood care and education from the affluent city suburbs to the rural agrarian farms and the arid and semi arid (ASAL) areas of Kenya.

Language: English

Published: Dordrecht: Springer Netherlands, 2013

ISBN: 978-94-007-4972-6 978-94-007-4971-9

Series: Educating the Young Child

Article

Four Montessori Schools to Start

Available from: ProQuest Historical Newspapers

Publication: San Francisco Chronicle (San Francisco, California)

Pages: 1

Americas, Maria Montessori - Biographic sources, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: "Los Angeles, April 30 - With the intention of establishing four great Montessori schools in California, Dr. Maria Montessori, founder of the educational system that bears her name, today declared that Americas are more fitted for the word of advancing educational work than any other people. One of her schools will be in Pasadena, on in Los Angeles, one in San Diego, and the other in San Francisco. "Americans seem more interested in their young than do people of other countries," Madame Montessori declared, "and they are also more alert. It is for these reasons that they embrace and develop more quickly what is for the child's benefit. A child is born into the world good. What it develops of wrongdoing is taught it by adults. If left to follow its original instincts it would be and do only good.""

Language: English

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

The European Roots of Early Childhood Education in North America

Available from: Springer Link

Publication: International Journal of Early Childhood, vol. 18, no. 1

Pages: 6-21

Americas, Canada, Kindergarten (Froebel system of education) - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., North America

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Abstract/Notes: Early childhood education in North America is currently in a state of flux. While Piagetian approaches to early childhood education curricula seem to predominate in North America today, some of the influences of the other paradigms discussed below are still in evidence. The idea of nurturing children as well as educating them has endured, even with the new cognitive focus. The concept of curricula appropriate to a child’s developmental level, first introduced by Froebel, has remained an important idea. The Montessori method has enjoyed a renaissance in North America, and specially designed curricula for the disabled has been re-established as the norm, after Itard’s and Seguin’s pioneering examples. Yet, new issues in early childhood education have arisen in North America. There is a great debate on the effects of day care, the changing family, the possibility of “hurried children”, and the role of state support in a “universal” child care system. The recent Report of the task force on child care in Canada reviewed many of these issues, and used data on child care arrangements in a number of European countries compared to canada and the United States in much of its discussion. It is not surprising, given the history of models of child care which have come from Europe to North America, that North Americans are once again looking across the Atlantic for fresh ideas.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1007/BF03176578

ISSN: 0020-7187, 1878-4658

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