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747 results

Conference Paper

Keys to the 21st Century: Does Montessori Elementary Provide Them?

AMI International Study Conference

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Language: English

Published: Washington, D.C.: AMI-USA, 1989

Pages: 99-107

Book

The Montessori Elementary Material

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Language: English

Published: Herndon, Virginia: Books international, 1996

Article

Montessori Elementary Teacher Training Course

Publication: Children's House: A Magazine Devoted to the Child and His Education at Home and in School, vol. 7, no. 2

Pages: 26

Montessori training courses, Trainings

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Language: English

ISSN: 0009-4137

Patent

Device for teaching young children elementary mathematics

Maria Montessori - Writings

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Abstract/Notes: This invention relates to a device for teaching young children elementary mathematics. For this purpose I provide a number of strips of paper of varying widths (preferably four such strips) having oii one side numbers and on the other side an adhesive surface. The narrowest strip contains the figure 1 repeated one below the other throughout the strip. The next the figure 10, the next the figure 100, the next the figure 1000 and so on as may be required. Preferably the strips of paper are wound on spools or reels differing only in that their width corresponds to the width of the paper strips. The spools or reels may if desired be threaded upon a common centre-piece. The strips may be all of the same colour or of different colours. By means of such strips it is possible to teach young children quite easily simple addition of two or more numbers by building up tne said numbers by cutting off the requisite pieces of the strips and pasting them on to a book or other surface and adding up the result. Similarly it is possible to teach simple subtraction by teaching the children first to build up the larger number out of pieces of the strips and then to take away pieces corresponding to the smaller number.

Language: English

Date of issue: 1930-06-12

Patent

Device for teaching young children elementary multiplication

Maria Montessori - Writings

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Abstract/Notes: This invention consists of a device for teaching small children multiplication. For this purpose I form a rectangular frame, preferably of wood having on it a number of parallel vertical wires on each of which are strung ten beads. Preferably there are nine such wires. At the bottom of the frame opposite the enid of each of the wires is placed the AD figure 0, and at the top of the frame reading from the right to the left opposite the ends of the wires are placed the numbers 1, 10, 100, and so on (if there are nine wires) up to a hundred million respectively. Preferably the three numbers up to 100 are printed in the same colour on the same background, the numbers 1000 to 100,000 are painted in the same colour and ea on the same background, but with the colour of the printing or the background different from that of the former three numbers and similarly the numbers a million to a hundred million, the printing or the background of all three being the same but differing in one or other from both of the foregoing sets of figures Preferably the beads are in three colours, those on the wires corresponding to the figures 1, i000 and a million being the same colour, those on the wires corresponding to the figures 10, 10,000 and 10 million being the same colour and those on the wires corresponding to the figures 100; 100,000 and 100 million being of the same colour. Preferably the wires are evenly spaced apart...

Language: English

Date of issue: 1930-09-04

Patent

Device for teaching young children elementary mathematics

Maria Montessori - Writings

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Abstract/Notes: This is a device for teaching small children multiplication. For this purpose I provide two sets of numbers printed or written on card board, to paper, bone or similar suitable substance.I The first sets consist of several (and preferably six) series of nine numbers each, X the first of these series consisting of the units 1 to 9, the next multiples of ten from 10 to 90, the next multiples of 100 from 100 to 900 the next similar multiples of 1000, the next similar multiples of 10,000 and the last of 100,000 and so on as may be required. Preferably each series is printed in a different colour from every other series, but the individual numbers of the series are printed in the same colour and the piece of material on which the set is printed differs only in the matter of length. The numbers hereinbefore described are intended to be used for selection in order to make up the answer of the sum. I provide another set of numbers consisting of a number of series (preferably four) the first series consisting of the numbers 1 to 9. the next consisting of the numbers 2 to 9 and the number 10, the next consisting of the numbers 2 to 9 and the number 100 and the last consisting of tne numbers 2 to 9 and the number 1000...

Language: English

Date of issue: 1930-07-31

Book

The MAGnet Newsletter on Mixed-Age Grouping in Preschool and Elementary Settings, 1992-1997 [Volumes 1-6]

Available from: ERIC

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Abstract/Notes: These 11 newsletter issues provide a forum for discussion and exchange of ideas regarding mixed-age grouping in preschool and elementary schools. The October 1992 issue focuses on the mixed-age approach as an educational innovation, defines relevant terms, and presents advice from Oregon teachers on teaching mixed-age groups. The March 1993 issue discusses: how children learn to care for the needs of others; preparing the environment for mixed-age grouping; and communicating with parents and visitors. a Multi-Age Classroom Observation Guide is also presented. The October 1993 issue discusses applying Piagetian theory to the mixed-age classroom; identifies the support needed to institutionalize mixed-age primary level classes; provides cautions for caregivers of mixed-age groups; and discusses use of parent workshops on the whole-language multi-age classroom. The Spring/Summer and Fall/Winter 1994 issues address student assessment in mixed-age classrooms and highlight the approach taken in individual programs. The Spring/Summer 1995 issue discusses implementing the mixed-age classroom and the benefits of mixed-age grouping. The Fall/Winter 1995 issue introduces the concept of looping and its advantages and disadvantages. The Spring/Summer 1996 issue focuses on using mixed-age grouping for at-risk students. The Fall/Winter 1996 issue examines how mixed-age grouping helps children develop social skills and a sense of belonging, and the potential risks of mixed-age grouping. The Spring/Summer 1997 issue deals with the risk of bullying in mixed-age groups. The Fall/Winter 1997 issue discusses sociodramatic play in the mixed-age setting. Regular features in most newsletter issues include "Quotable Quotes," relevant brief quotations regarding mixed-age groups; and descriptions of recent publications and other print and electronic resources. (KB)

Language: English

Published: Champaign, Illinois: ERIC Clearinghouse on Elementary and Early Childhood Education, 1997

Book

The Holliday Montessori Magnet Elementary School, 1990-1991. Formative Evaluation

Academic achievement, Americas, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Elementary education, Holliday Montessori School (Kansas City, Missouri), Magnet schools, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, Nongraded schools, North America, Parent attitudes

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Abstract/Notes: This formative evaluation report documents the progress made by the Holliday Montessori Magnet Elementary School (Kansas City, Missouri) during the first year of implementation of Montessori themes. The evaluation was based on the goals established by the Holliday Montessori Site Plan and the Long-Range Magnet School Plan. Examined were enrollment data; program implementation; parent, teacher, administrator, and student attitudes toward the program; and student achievement. Enrollment data indicated that the school's enrollment was 9% below program capacity, and that the school was close to achieving the desegregation goal of 60% minority and 40% nonminority students and had maintained court-ordered class size limits. Achievement scores for nonminority kindergarten students were above national norms in math and language subtests, but minority student achievement scores fell below the national norm. Classroom observations, site visits, questionnaires, and interviews suggest that the program is being implemented according to the site plan and long-range plan objectives. However, program participants identified problems associated with inadequate supplies and materials, student transportation, communication among colleagues, vacancies for Montessori resources staff, and training for teachers and paraprofessionals. Perceptions of parents were positive and reflected a strong degree of satisfaction in most areas of program implementation. Recommendations based on the evaluation results are provided. Appended are 4 references and related materials.

Language: English

Published: Kansas City, Missouri: Kansas City School District, Aug 1991

Article

Challenges of Implementing Montessori English Teaching Model in Saudi Arabian Elementary Schools

Available from: The Egyptian Knowledge Bank

Publication: مجلة دراسات في المناهج وطرق التدريس [Journal of Studies in Curriculum and Teaching Methods], no. 245

Pages: 1-25 (Article 2)

Asia, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Middle East, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Saudi Arabia, Western Asia

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Abstract/Notes: Montessori English Teaching Model (METM) is a unique way of instruction that uses specifically designed learning settings and approaches to nurture students' intrinsic desire to learn. English achievements for Saudi students have been for long very low. The current study aimed to investigate the real challenges of implementing Montessori English Teaching Model in Saudi Arabian elementary schools. Qualitative method, namely focus group discussion, was used. Four purposive focus groups with different educational positions and experiences were formulated, namely school supervisors (SS), school principals (SP), English teachers (ET), and English curriculum specialists (ES). The major findings of the study were that1) major challenges existed for implementing the METM in Saudi elementary schools, 2) the challenges concentrated on four categories: educational context, work ethics and environment, nature of teachers and students, and social aspects, and 3) agreements on some of the sub-themes fluctuated. Recommendations for further investigations are made for interested and educational personnel.

Language: Arabic

DOI: 10.21608/mjat.2019.101825

ISSN: 2535-213X

Master's Thesis

Clinical and Kinematic Characteristics of Cursive Handwriting in Elementary Age Children

Available from: ProQuest - Dissertations and Theses

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Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this research was to study the clinical and kinematic characteristics of cursive handwriting in healthy third and fifth grade children. One hundred-nine children participated in this study; 53 were in grade three and 56 were in grade five. Five commonly used clinical assessments were selected addressing strength, sensorimotor and coordination characteristics specific to handwriting. Two handwriting assessments, the Evaluation Tool of Children's Handwriting-Cursive, and the writing subtest of the Jebsen Test of Hand Function, assessed speed and/or legibility of handwriting. A simple cursive writing task was also produced on a digitized tablet and analyzed for kinematic features. Multiple T-Tests were used to determine significant gender differences and the effects of maturation on handwriting. Logistic regression analysis was used to determine if clinical or kinematic characteristics were predictors of legibility in cursive handwriting. Multiple linear regression analyses were used to determine if clinical or kinematic characteristics of handwriting contributed to handwriting speed and legibility. Results of this study indicate that in all groups, boys had less legible handwriting than girls. With maturation, healthy children in the third and fifth grades improve in their ability to smoothly write in the up and down direction, which is complemented by improved hand steadiness and coordination. The strong association between the grooved pegboard and legibility suggest that improving a child's in-hand manipulation skills may contribute to improvement in handwriting skills. The Jebsen and grooved pegboard contributed to handwriting speed and legibility. The findings of this study will guide Occupational Therapists in improving their understanding of the clinical and kinematic mechanisms underlying handwriting, which are critical to the development of appropriate intervention paradigms.

Language: English

Published: Detroit, Michigan, 2012

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