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Master's Thesis

Where does it all begin? An examination of three alternative prekindergarten educational experiences

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

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Abstract/Notes: This thesis investigates historical backgrounds, philosophies, and practices of three well-established prekindergarten/early childhood programs--Montessori, Waldorf, and Head Start. Investigative methods included library and internet research, classroom observations, and interviews with program administrators, teachers, and parents. Findings showed good consistency between philosophies and practices, notable differences among programs, and certain pedagogical and theoretical issues unique to each. Data indicated that Montessori promotes children's natural development and self-teaching through sequential didactic materials presented in a prepared environment with a focus on sensory, motor, and intellectual experiences; Waldorf fosters children's creativity, imaginative play, and sensitivity to nature through songs, poems, verbally-told stories, and eurythmy (a dance-like art form); and Head Start provides comprehensive services to disadvantaged children and their families through planned educational experiences, health and nutrition services, family and community program involvement. Research was not directed toward establishing program effectiveness or determining which program demonstrated the best early childhood practices.

Language: English

Published: Saratoga Springs, New York, 2003

Book

Montessori Collaborative World Review: The Montessori Roots of Social Justice

Available from: Montessori Norge

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Abstract/Notes: Issues of social justice are not new. The struggles of marginalized humans are deeply rooted in beliefs and actions of our past that remain in our present and that have all the signs of carrying on into our future. One might think that we have evolved; that these deep roots have been upended and progress has been made. The conversations, discimination, and violence that exist suggest that very little progress has been made. We are at a critical point in addressing the challenges that our fellow human beings not only experience but that will also become a part of the fabric of who they are and will be carried on into future relationships and generations only to repress the quality of their one life lived. As we prepared to come together to celebrate 150 years of Dr. Maria Montessori's life and legacy - she was born on August 31, 1870 - we felt it was imperative that we honor her not only as the extraordinary educator and scientist that she was but also as a champion of humanitarian causes. This publication serves as a means for amplifying our voice and shines a spotlight on social justice, or rather injustice, for those within our community and beyond. We are grateful that we were joined in this effort by others who feel this same calling, and that we were led by David Kahn, as executive editor, through his inspiration, dedication to authenticity, and simply his ability to get things done. Our hope is that this publication will not be one that merely sits on a shelf but rather lives on through inspired action.

Language: English

Published: [S.I.]: [s.n.], 2019

Volume: 1, no. 1

Book

Maria Montessori: Her Life and Work

Available from: Internet Archive

bibliografia

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Abstract/Notes: Maria Montessori is important background reading for parents considering Montessori education for their children, as well as for those training to become Montessori teachers. The first woman to win a degree as a Doctor of Medicine in Italy in 1896, Maria Montessori's mission to improve children's education began in the slums of Rome in 1907, and continued throughout her lifetime. Her insights into the minds of children led her to develop prepared environments and other tools and devices that have come to characterize Montessori education today. Her influence in other countries has been profound and many of her teaching methods have been adopted by educators generally. Part biography and part exposition of her ideas, this engaging book reveals through her letters and personal diaries Maria Montessori's humility and delight in the success of her educational experiments and is an ideal introduction to the principals and practices of the greatest educational pioneer of the 20th century.

Language: English

Published: Fresno, California: The Academy Library Guild, 1959

Edition: 1st American Edition

Article

Three Approaches from Europe: Waldorf, Montessori, and Reggio Emilia

Available from: ECRP Website

Publication: Early Childhood Research and Practice, vol. 4, no. 1

Pages: 1-14

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Waldorf, Montessori, and Reggio Emilia are three progressive approaches to early childhood education that appear to be growing in influence in North America and to have many points in common. This article provides a brief comparative introduction and highlights several key areas of similarity and contrast. All three approaches represent an explicit idealism and turn away from war and violence toward peace and reconstruction. They are built on coherent visions of how to improve human society by helping children realize their full potential as intelligent, creative, whole persons. In each approach, children are viewed as active authors of their own development, strongly influenced by natural, dynamic, self-righting forces within themselves, opening the way toward growth and learning. Teachers depend for their work with children on carefully prepared, aesthetically pleasing environments that serve as a pedagogical tool and provide strong messages about the curriculum and about respect for children. Partnering with parents is highly valued in all three approaches, and children are evaluated by means other than traditional tests and grades. However, there are also many areas of difference, some at the level of principle and others at the level of strategy. Underlying the three approaches are variant views of the nature of young children's needs, interests, and modes of learning that lead to contrasts in the ways that teachers interact with children in the classroom, frame and structure learning experiences for children, and follow the children through observation/documentation. The article ends with discussion of the methods that researchers apply to analyze the strengths and weaknesses of each approach.

Language: English

ISSN: 1524-5039

Doctoral Dissertation

The Feasibility of Montessorian Education in the Primary School: An Historico-Educational Exposition

Available from: University of South Africa - Institutional Repository

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Abstract/Notes: Maria Montessori's work was initiated in 1898 as a result of her becoming acutely aware of deficient children's learning patterns, while working at the Psychiatric clinic of the University of Rome. The principles which dominate the system, however, did not spring in full panoply from Montessori. Indeed, her inspiration came largely from early and mid-nineteenth century writings of two French physicians, Itard and Seguin, who were Also involved in the teaching of deficient children. Extending on the ideas of these two educator-physicians, as well as the ideas of Froebel, Montessori innovatively brought the child's senses into contact with carefully selected didactic apparatus in a carefully structured and ordered environment. According to Montessori, the liberty of the child is a prerequisite for self-education and forms the first major pillar of her didactic theory, and thus becomes the focus of the first chapter dealing with her didactic approach (chapter three). Montessori believed that the function of education was to assist growth and if the individual child was given the liberty of movement within a prepared environment, a sense of competence would be achieved and the learning of the child would come about almost spontaneously. The principles of individuality and the training of the senses comprise the other two pillars, and form the basis for chapter four and five respectively. The principle of individuality is rooted in the belief that each child has a uniqueness which cannot be ignored without irretrievable damage to his personality. The current educational situation in South Africa, reveals a diversity of educational problems as a result of different ethnic and cultural groups all being thrust into a common educational system. The insidious pressures of conformity to a single standard of education must of necessity lead to a compromise of standards. The exposure of educational deficiencies inherent in such a move is characterised by learning impediments and deficiencies in the educational scenario. Research has therefore been undertaken in an attempt to extract those aspects that could provide meaningful pedagogic assistance to meet a present educational need.

Language: English

Published: Pretoria, South Africa, 1994

Book

Standard Operating Procedure for a Montessori School

Americas, Classroom environment, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, North America, Prepared environment, United States of America

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Language: English

Published: Oak Park, Illinois: Oak Park Montessori Child Development Center, 1964

Edition: 2nd ed.

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