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Book

Maria Montessori: Una biografia

Maria Montessori - Biographic sources

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Language: Italian

Published: Roma, Italy: Edizioni Mediterranee, 2009

ISBN: 978-88-272-2033-7

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Preconstructing Suspicion and Recasting Masculinity in Preschool Settings

Available from: Hipatia Press

Publication: Qualitative Research in Education, vol. 3, no. 3

Pages: 320-344

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Abstract/Notes: Although there is literature explaining how female ethnographers negotiate male-dominated research settings, there is a lack of literature explaining how male ethnographers negotiate female-dominated settings. It is, more or less, taken for granted the research settings males choose will be suitable for them. The field of early childhood education, and preschools in particular, would benefit from a basic explanation of male fieldworker practices and why they are necessary for men in early childhood education settings. Drawing on personal experiences from two years of ethnographic research, I turn to a Montessori preschool in the Midwestern United States to address the complexities of being a male fieldworker in a female-dominated setting. I first explicate some dimensions of preconstructing suspicion of males in ECE. I then develop a gender recasting strategy with the goal of recasting masculinity. Recasting masculinity is a reflexive self-presentation strategy using personal characteristics as resources to build trust and rapport with research participants.

Language: English

DOI: 10.4471/qre.2014.50

ISSN: 2014-6418

Article

Lili Peller and Me

Publication: NAMTA Quarterly, vol. 9, no. 3

Pages: 2-7

David Kahn - Writings, Lili Esther Peller-Roubiczek - Biographic sources, Margot R. Waltuch - Writings

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Language: English

Article

In Memoriam: Ruth Nunnari

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 27, no. 1

Pages: 18

Obituaries, Ruth Nunnari - Biographic sources

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Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Blog Post

Diversity in Public Montessori: It’s Complicated

African American community, African Americans, Americas, Mira C. Debs - Biographic sources, Mira C. Debs - Writings, Montessori schools, North America, Public Montessori, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Mira C. Debs, Yale Sociology of Education Ph.D. candidate and founder of Montessori for Social Justice, presented a chapter of her dissertation at the recent 2016 Montessori for Social Justice Conference: Writing the History of Public Montessori. The takeaway? It’s a little more complicated than you might think.

Language: English

Published: Jul 1, 2016

Book Section

Dr. Maria Montessori

Book Title: Maria Montessori's Contribution to Educational Thought and Practice: Souvenir in Honour of Dr. Maria Montessori's Birth Centenary, 31 August, 1970

Pages: 5-9

Maria Montessori - Biographic sources

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Language: English

Published: New Delhi, India: Association of Delhi Montessorians, 1971

Article

In Memory: Lance Corporal Julian T. Brennan US Marine Corps

Publication: Tomorrow's Child, vol. 17, no. 3

Pages: 9

Julian T. Brennan - Biographic sources, Obituaries

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Language: English

ISSN: 1071-6246

Article

Maria Montessori and the "Glass House"

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 20, no. 3

Pages: 7-13

Classroom environment, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Maria Montessori - Biographic sources, Maria Montessori - Philosophy, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, Observation (Educational method), Panama-Pacific International Exposition (1915, San Francisco, California), Prepared environment, ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Discusses the creation of Maria Montessori's glass-house "Casa dei Bambini" preschool at the San Francisco Panama-Pacific International Exhibition in 1915, which brought the Montessori method of child-centered, individualized, early-childhood education to national attention. Also highlights Montessori's career in Europe and the United States and her contributions to education.

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

In Memoriam [Helen Smart]

Publication: Communications (Association Montessori Internationale, 195?-2008), vol. 1956, no. 3

Pages: 17

Helen Smart - Biographic sources, Obituaries

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Language: English

ISSN: 0519-0959

Article

The Effect of Using Montessori Method on Developing Kindergartener's Speaking and Reading skills

Available from: The Egyptian Knowledge Bank

Publication: مجلة التربية في القرن 21 للدراسات التربوية والنفسية [Journal of Education in the 21st Century for Educational and Psychological Studies], vol. 1, no. 10

Pages: 1-23 (Article 3)

Africa, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Egypt, Language development, Middle East, Montessori method of education - Evaluation, North Africa, Reading - Academic achievement

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Abstract/Notes: play and have fun, the learning and teaching processes should be suited totheir nature. There is a number of known interesting learning activitieswhich are based on the arts, games and other oral activities. Thus Englishshould be taught as a means of communication and researchers should dotheir best to help EFL learners to develop their reading and speaking skills.Ur (2000: 12) declared that "out of all the four skills ,listening,speaking, reading and writing, speaking seems the most important, peoplewho speak a language are known as speakers of the language, as if speakingincluded all other kinds of knowing a target language" Today, many secondlanguage learners give the speaking skill priority in their learning because ifthey master this skill then they will be considered as if they have masteredall of the other skills.The importance of speaking is best shown with the integration of theother language skills. For instance, speaking can help students develop theirvocabulary and grammar and improve their writing skill. Ability to read isthe primary fundamental skill required for children to achieve academicsuccess. Currently, the expectation is that all children should begin readingearly and be able to read on grade level by third grade (U.S. Department ofEducation, 2002)Another way that speaking and reading are connected is throughdecoding .decoding is the process of pulling apart the sounds that each(1)letter makes, and then putting them back together to make a word.it is mucheasier for a child to sound out a word on the page that they have alreadyheard in conversation, than a completely new word. There less informationto process since the meaning and the pronunciation of the word are alreadyknown. A child who has heard more words spoken is at an advantage whenlearning to read, the skill of reading is special and often difficult to acquire.the fact that anyone learns how to read is something of a miracle. Learningto read is different from learning to speak; in the development of humanhistory, speaking precedes reading by thousands of yearsItalian educator and physician Maria Montessori developed aninnovative teaching methodology for children that left an indelible mark oneducation curricula throughout the world. Montessori education is a sensorybasedpedagogy that is based on the belief that children learn at their ownpace through manipulation of objects (Lopata, Wallace, & Finn,2005).According to Montessori, (Montessori, 1967, p.14). the goal ofeducation is “to be able to find activities that are so intrinsically meaningfulthat we want to throw ourselves into them” (Crain : 2004) confirmed thisassertion by noting that “when children find tasks that enable them todevelop their naturally emerging capacities, they become interested in themand concentrate deeply on them.In general, there is a need for more research regarding successfuleducational methods and pedagogy for this disenfranchised populationbecause the existing research does not adequately provide educationalplanners with the resources or information to develop effective programs(Williams:2001) examined the impact of the Montessori Method on(2)refugee children‟s social, cognitive and motor development using adifference-in-difference approach .The Montessori method of teachingaimed the fullest possible development of the whole child, ultimatelypreparing him for life‘s many rich experiences. Complemented by hertraining in medicine, psychology and anthropology, Dr .Maria Montessori(1870-1952) developed her philosophy of education based upon actualobservation of children.Students are assigned their own personal workstations designed witheducational items that correspond to the daily lesson plans and activities.Students are responsible for setting up the work area, choosing the learningactivity, applying the physical materials, and returning the materials back tothe shelves (Pickering: 2004).Children are always free to move around theroom and are not given deadlines for the various learning tasks. Desks arearranged into open networks that encourage meaningful group discourse, aswell as independent learning.Students work together with the teachers to organize time strategicallyin order to complete the necessary learning tasks of the day. The amount ofteachers in the classroom varies based on class size, but usually two teachersare used for sections with thirty or more students, In most settings, childrenare grouped in mixed ages and abilities based on three to six-year incrementssuch as 0-3, 3-6, 6-12, 12-15 and 15-18 (other Montessori schools use onlythree year increment settings). Ages are mixed so that older students canassist and mentor the younger children in the group. Students are groupedaccording to common interests and experiences rather than the ability andskill level (Pickering: 2004).According to Montessori, from birth to age three the child learnsprimarily through the “unconscious absorbent mind.” During education in(3)the first three years, Montessori believed that it was necessary for theparents to develop in the role of unobtrusive educator; there to protect andguide without infringing on the child‟s right to self-discovery (Crain: 2004).This early developmental model enabled children to learn their own skillsat their own place. During the ages of three to six the child begins to utilizethe “conscious absorbent mind” which prompts students to participate increative problem-solving consisting of wooden and metal objects of varioussizes and shapes, personally designed by Montessori. If a problem becomestoo difficult or overwhelming for the student, the teacher delays the projectfor a future day. Children also engage in practical work consisting ofhousehold tasks and personal maintenance.

Language: Arabic

DOI: 10.21608/jsep.2020.84322

ISSN: 2682-1931

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