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485 results

Article

American Montessori Society 1999 Board Elections–Individual Members and Heads of School Ballot

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 11, no. 1

Pages: 49–50

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Abstract/Notes: Biographical sketches of 10 candidates

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Learning How to Learn: An American Approach to Montessori

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 19, no. 1

Pages: 102-103

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Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

An American Teacher In Uganda

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 11, no. 4

Pages: 19–20

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Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Establishing an American Montessori Movement: Another Look at the Early Years

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 18, no. 2

Pages: 44-49

Americas, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Montessori method of education - History, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Though Montessorians have existed in the United States for nearly a century, a distinctly American version of the system did not begin to take hold until the late 1950s. What was referred to at the time as the "second spring" was actually a remarkable moment not just for Montessori education, but also for American culture at large. For the Montessori movement, the years 1959 to 1963 witnessed rapid growth, turmoil, and the establishment of educational, political, and ideological patterns that still influence the movement today. In this article, the authors trace what happened in those years, why it happened, and the impact those events had on the subsequent development of Montessori education in the United States as they look at the historical context surrounding those events in order to provide a richer understanding of the origins of the American Montessori identity. A closer look at the early years of the movement reveals a complex story of two strong personalities, Mario Montessori and Nancy McCormick Rambusch, who shared a deep commitment to the Montessori ideal, and who squabbled endlessly over how to realize that ideal.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

A Vision of the Future: American Montessori and the "Erdkinder"

Publication: Montessori Matters

Pages: 15–21, 24

Americas, Conferences, Montessori organizations - United States of America, North America, North American Montessori Teachers' Association (NAMTA) - Conferences, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Review of NAMTA conference, "Montessori Secondary in Action"; visits to American schools

Language: English

Article

The Initial American Reception of the Montessori Method

Publication: Education Digest, vol. 34, no. 2

Pages: 49-51

Americas, Maria Montessori - Biographic sources, Montessori method of education, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Montessori movement, Montessori organizations - United States of America, North America, United States of America

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Language: English

ISSN: 0013-127X

Article

Montessori Brought to Mexican American Homes

Publication: AMS News, vol. 5, no. 2

Pages: 3

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Language: English

ISSN: 0065-9444

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

American Notes - Editorial

Available from: HathiTrust

Publication: Education (Boston), vol. 34, no. 5

Pages: 328-329

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Abstract/Notes: This article is also referred to as "Essence of the Montessori Method".

Language: English

ISSN: 0013-1172

Article

Home Alone: With No Original Text as Guide, Americans Develop Their Own Approaches to Applying Montessori Principles in the Home

Available from: University of Connecticut Libraries - American Montessori Society Records

Publication: Public School Montessorian, vol. 7, no. 1

Pages: 1

Public Montessori

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Abstract/Notes: Introduction to the issue

Language: English

ISSN: 1071-6246

Doctoral Dissertation (Ph.D.)

American Muslim Tarbiya: Parents, Experts, ʿUlamāʾ, and Debates about Mothering

Available from: Knowledge UChicago

Islamic Montessori method of education

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Abstract/Notes: This dissertation accounts for debates around correct American Muslim mothering in the 21st century. It centers around the following underlying questions: What advice do Muslim modernists and Sunni ʿulamāʾ offer to mothers for raising Muslims in the limited, privatized spaces of their nurseries, homes, and mosque communities? How do Muslim mothers who desire to rear children communally, in harmony with their fiṭra (innate nature) and according to traditional notions of tarbiya (development, education) accomplish this as religious minorities in a hyper capitalist, secular modern context? What are the different ways that mothers negotiate the ideas of Muslim advice-givers, which sometimes clash both internally and with the diverse opinions of American pediatricians, psychologists, and neuroscientists? This study considers the nuanced impact secular modernity, feminism, and the expanding authority of the medical and psy disciplines have had on American Muslim child-rearing practices, reconfigurations of gender roles in Muslim families and the intergenerational transmission of American Islam. To gauge this impact, this dissertation narrowly focuses on two highly contested decisions mothers make in early childhood: how to feed infants after birth and whether to corporally punish young children. The data for this project was collected from in-depth fieldwork interviews with a diverse sample of Muslim mothers conducted in 2017 in the city of Chicago and its surrounding suburbs. This data was analyzed by situating the types of religious and parenting education mothers had both received and sought out and by surveying the Islamic scriptural and jurisprudential texts, contemporary childrearing manuals, and social media sources that informed their child-rearing practices. This dissertation found that most mothers were much more likely to formula feed or breastfeed their infants themselves than allow other mothers to nurse their children. None of my interlocutors engaged wet nurses or used donated human milk for infant feeding. Additionally, most mothers disapproved of using corporal punishment for children’s discipline, either by themselves or others in loco parentis. Corporal punishment of children was increasingly viewed not as one method among many to cultivate children’s embodiment of ritual practices, but as child abuse. However, a minority of mothers demonstrated an openness to sharing milk and employing constrained forms of physical discipline in specific circumstances. In investigating the ever-shifting child-rearing advice from religious scholars (ʿulamāʾ), non-Muslim scientific experts, and a hybridized class of Muslim parent educators, this dissertation offers another avenue for understanding the fragmented nature of religious authority in American Muslim communities. It contributes to the growing body of scholarship that tracks the rising popularity of Sunnī rationalism and traditionalism by noting the way it attracts mothers who long for styles of parenting that are more shared and communal and less demanding and intensive. Finally, this dissertation affords insights into ongoing contestation over what constitutes correct, ethical tarbiya and how best to integrate and transmit American Islam

Language: English

Published: Chicago, Illinois, 2023

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