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Article

Famous Dr. Montessori Begins to Teach L. A. Children Next Monday

Available from: Newspapers.com

Publication: Los Angeles Record (Los Angeles, California)

Pages: 4

Americas, Maria Montessori - Biographic sources, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: "Dr. Maria Montessori, the noted Italian educator, who has won such renown throughout the world for her discovery of new methods of teaching little children, will begin her third international demonstration classes at Boyle Heights intermediate school Monday. These sun-kissed, happy, healthy little children, pupils of the Montessori class, established by Miss Katherine Moore of this city at East Seventh st. school will constitute one of the three groups to be taught during the demonstration. EDUCATORS COME HERE. Notable educators from all parts of the United States are arriving daily to attend the instruction course which Dr. Montessori will give during her stay. The course will continue two months. This will be the first time the famed teacher of little children has ever conducted a demonstration class outside of Rome, Italy. Though invited to give this third international class at many notable points in this country, she has chosen Los Angeles. There are probably three reasons for this. The first, perhaps, is the fact that Miss Katherine Moore, teacher of the local Montessori classes, was a favorite student and a member of the first class graduated by Dr. Montessori in Rome. FORMS FIRST CLASS. The second, probably, is the fact that Miss Moore established the Montessori system in Los Angeles, making it the first place in this country to follow the specific teachings of the Italian educator. The third is the fact that scores of invitations have been issued by various educational organizations in this city. SHOWER BATH. Preparations for the gala event are already in order at the East Seventh st. school. Each day of demonstration classes, the 30 youngsters representing seven or eight nationalities, none Americans, will be taken from their school to the Boyle Heights Intermediate school on the car. Though the children don't understand just what it is all about, they know they are to have a treat of some sort. The idea of a car ride is a joy in itself for them. The board of education has granted Principal Larkey of the East Seventh st. school sufficient funds to pay for transportation. The first thing on the program each morning for these 30 expectant youngsters will be a shower bath apiece. Then each will be dressed in clean little aprons and the trip started. There are three Montessori schools in this divinity, all started by Miss Moore. The other two are at St. Catherine's school on West Adams st. and in the Hotel Maryland at Pasadena. Dr. Montessori will go from here to San Diego, where the exposition committee has appropriated $1000 for equipment and a building in which she can hold her classes. Later she goes to San Francisco."

Language: English

Book Section

The Fifth Woman: Maria Montessori

Available from: Springer Link

Book Title: America's Early Montessorians: Anne George, Margaret Naumburg, Helen Parkhurst and Adelia Pyle

Pages: 37-57

Americas, Maria Montessori - Biographic sources, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Chapter two presents a biography of Maria Montessori and describes the key elements in her method when George, Naumburg, Pyle, and Parkhurst were students in her training courses. By 1910, Montessori had constructed the core features of her educational theory, known as the Montessori Method. Her educational theory was based on her medical education at the University of Rome, her work with children with mental disabilities, her intensive reading of the pioneer special education educators, Itard and Sequin, pedagogical anthropology and her first school, the Casa dei Bambini, in 1908, in Rome’s impoverished San Lorenzo district. Montessori’s view of the child holistically encompassed physical, sensory, muscular, social, intellectual, and moral development. All children, she believed, like all people, shared a universal human nature which led to common modes of development. Focusing on early childhood education, ages three to six, Montessori’s key principles were: children need liberty to fulfill their inner need to develop fully through their own self-, or auto-education; their self-education is optimal in a prepared structured learning environment with accessible didactic apparatus and material which they are free to choose and work out their own self- development; the first level of instruction develops sensory, muscular, and practical skills which lead to higher level cognitive, cultural, and literary skills. Montessori was recognized as an educational innovator in Europe but not widely known in the United States. George, Naumburg, Pyle, and Parkhurst played significant roles in introducing Montessori to Americans and in implementing the Montessori Method in the United States.

Language: English

Published: Cham, Switzerland: Palgrave Macmillan, 2020

ISBN: 978-3-030-54835-3

Series: Historical Studies in Education

Doctoral Dissertation

Toward an Improved Model of Education: Maria Montessori, Karl Popper, and the Evolutionary Epistemology of Human Learning

Available from: Lehigh University Library

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Abstract/Notes: Although most Americans steadfastly maintain that getting a good education guarantees a better society and opens the door to more rewarding careers, it is debated regularly whatthe best set of educational priorities and practices that constitute good schoolingshould be. Sociopolitical considerations of power and control have often driven the agendas of educational reform movements in the United States, and these agendas have typically clustered around adult priorities and ideas of how knowledge should be “transmitted” to children (Cuban, 2003, 2004; Kliebard, 1995, 2002; Perkinson, 1968, 1980, 1984; Tyack & Cuban, 1995). It is asserted in this dissertation that approaches to educational reform should instead be derived from an informed understanding of naturalistic human learning so that curricular structures and pedagogical practices start from children and work backwards in support of their intrinsic curiosity and search for regularities in the world around them...

Language: English

Published: Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, 2012

Article

Journey Toward Sensitivity: An Examination of Multicultural Literature

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 14, no. 4

Pages: 26–29

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Abstract/Notes: Images of native Americans in children's books

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Book

An American Montessori Elementary Teacher: Indigenous American Montessori Models

Available from: ERIC

Americas, Indigenous communities, Indigenous peoples, Nancy McCormick Rambusch - Writings, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Maria Montessori's child-centered teaching method came to the United States in 1913 and became linked with an approach to progressive education and child rearing which many Americans considered permissive. During the post-World War II years, advocates of Montessori's method combined this permissive mode with elements of an authoritarian mode to produce an authoritative approach to teaching young children. Following this approach, educators at the Princeton Montessori School have developed and implemented a firm yet empathic teaching model for their classes. The social system which the teachers have developed in their classes respects children's intrinsic motivation in the form of a benign token economy, called a credit-debit system. In this system the rules of the classroom, and the rewards and sanctions attending the rules, are developed cooperatively between teacher and children. Teachers consider the small group as the basic unit of social organization for the presentation of lessons. Teachers present curricular subject areas in a sequence of steps which are numbered and which correspond to a set of materials preassembled by the teacher and directly accessible to the children. For each subject, students keep personal interactive journals which contain written and illustrated work for the whole year. Through these methods, teachers at the Princeton Montessori School demonstrate that they have understood the basic message of Montessori and imbedded that message in a culturally sensitive and appropriate form of schooling.

Language: English

Published: New Jersey: Princeton Center for Teacher Education, 1992

Article

Decolonizing Montessori: An Antiracist Approach to Our Practice

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 32, no. 4

Pages: 28-33

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: [...]when we talk about systemic oppression, it is with the understanding that it is a part of our infant country's identity, the very bedrock from which it was built, on land we viciously stole from Native Americans. Ashley Causey-Golden, owner of Afrocentric Montessori, a company that sells handmade materials and curriculum for Black children, says that before we can begin this work, we have to recognize the history of education in the United States: When we talk about decolonization, we have to acknowledge the origins of the education system within the United States. Education has been a tool that has been weaponized to limit access to non-white children and families, strip the language and cultural identity from Indigenous children, and, through the use of textbooks and learning materials, provide teachers and students with a Eurocentric view of world history. Conversely, the ways in which the American educational system has operated as a system of cultural deprivation and dominant white cultural assimilation is further problematic, and a key structural component of colonialism. (personal communications, 7/10/20,10/19/20) Once we identify the problem, it is time to search for solutions. When we approach the child with our personal biases in check, allow for expansive thinking and creation with the help of the prepared environment, we can facilitate children's journey of finding their cosmic task and the ideas and subjects that uniquely inspire them.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Book

The American Odyssey of Maria Montessori

Americas, Maria Montessori - Biographic sources, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Dr. Maria Montessori's 1913 visit and lecture tour to the United States is described in detail with numerous citations from newspaper coverage of the event. The enthusiastic reception extended to the European physician and educator is reviewed, and her meetings, notably with Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Graham Bell, President and Mrs. Woodrow Wilson, Miss Helen Keller, leading educators, and members of Boston society, are described. Varied responses of Americans to basic Montessori ideas and practices are disclosed, and the role of S. S. McClure of "McClure's Magazine" in originating and promoting the lecture tour is revealed. In conclusion, some reasons for the decline of the Montessori movement are suggested.

Language: English

Published: Washington, D.C.: Educational Resources Information, 1981

Article

Montessori

Available from: Trove - National Library of Australia

Publication: The Register (Adelaide, Australia)

Pages: 7

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Abstract/Notes: "From "COMMONSENSE": – In an interview with a friend of the Montessori, Miss Muriel Matters said that at Barcelona so many pupil teachers came from so many nations that Miss [Maria] Montessori was embarrassed by their numbers. These included Spanish priests and nuns. There were also many Portuguese and many Americans and English. Just before Miss Matters started for Australia the Director-in-Chief of the Primary Schools of India had sent an order for 400 sets of Montessori material."

Language: English

Honors Thesis

The Great Italian Educator: The Montessori Method and American Nativism in the 1910s

Available from: University of Kansas

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Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this project is to investigate to what extent Protestant nativism impeded the spread of the Montessori Method in the United States. The Montessori Method has experienced waves of popularity in America ever since it was first introduced in 1910. During the first wave of popularity, from 1910-1917, Dr. Maria Montessori, the founder, faced backlash from educators and educational philosophers for her scientific reasoning and her pedagogical and social philosophies. Some Montessori historians believe that these factors were critical in halting the spread of the Montessori Method in America in 1917. An additional theory is that Montessori’s personal identity, as an Italian Catholic woman, impeded the reception of her ideas in America. Considering that the time period was characterized by anti-Catholic rhetoric from political organizations as well as newspapers and journals, the theory makes sense. Research for this project was conducted by examining newspaper publications that covered the Montessori Method, rebuttals of the method published by American educators, and the books and articles written by Montessori advocates. Other primary sources include Catholic publications and Dr. Montessori’s own books and writings. Secondary sources, such as autobiographies of Maria Montessori’s life and examinations of nativist activity at the beginning of the 20th Century, help paint a picture of the state of America when Dr. Montessori visited in 1913. Overall, these sources indicate that anti-Catholic sentiments played a minor role, if any, in hampering the spread of the Montessori Method. Maria Montessori’s publicist, Samuel S. McClure, crafted a particular public image for Montessori, compatible with themes of social reform, Progressive educational reform, and feminism, which would appeal to most Americans. The creation of this public image is significant as it was a manifestation of the cultural upheaval experienced during the early 20th century and had lasting implications for Progressive education and the future of the Montessori Method in America. Supporters for the method emphasized the scientific foundation of the method, Dr. Montessori’s ideas for social reform through education, and the compatibility of the method with American ideals of individual freedom and responsibility. In the end, other factors such as leading educators’ disapproval of different aspects of the method, World War I, and Dr. Montessori’s personality led to the decline of the Montessori Method in America at that time.

Language: English

Published: Lawrence, Kansas, Apr 2019

Book Section

Montessori with Culturally Disadvantaged: A Cognitive-Developmental Interpretation of Some Research Findings

Book Title: Montessori Schools in America: Historical, Philosophical, and Empirical Research Perspectives

Pages: 169-180

African American community, Americas, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: This article was originally published as an entry in Early Education, eds. R. D. Hess and R. M. Bear (Chicago: Aldine, 1968), p. 105-118.

Language: English

Published: Lexington, Massachusetts: Ginn Custom Pub., 1983

Edition: 2nd ed.

ISBN: 0-536-04367-1

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