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78 results

Article

International News

Publication: Montessori Education, vol. 5, no. 6

Pages: 30

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Abstract/Notes: Sweden; Oregon, USA; note to correspondence students

Language: English

ISSN: 1354-1498

Book

Maria Montessori Writes to Her Grandchildren: Letters from India, 1939-1946

Asia, India, Maria Montessori - Biographic sources, Maria Montessori - Correspondence, Maria Montessori - Writings, South Asia

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Abstract/Notes: In October 1939, while the “storm of war was gathering in Europe”, Maria and Mario Montessori set off to India to deliver a training course and lecture tour. When Italy became involved in the war, the British rule of India did not give the Montessoris permission to leave; they were to spend close to seven years in India, which would become a defining period in Montessori’s outlook on life and education.The letters Montessori wrote to her four teenage grandchildren in Holland give a completely new, private insight into that compellingly interesting period. We see a woman who is deeply connected to her family and friends. We also see her strong commitment to bringing progress and fighting illiteracy in India, which grew into an enduring love for the country and its people. Montessori’s colourful descriptions of her journey and life in India, her worries about her grandchildren in war-torn Europe, and her son’s imprisonment make a fascinating read.

Language: English

Published: Amsterdam, The Netherlands: Montessori-Pierson Publishing Company, 2020

ISBN: 978-90-79506-49-1 90-79506-49-4

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

Effective and Efficient Parent-Teacher Communication

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

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Abstract/Notes: This action research study examines parent-teacher communication using a combination of an online email program called MailChimp, a text app called Remind, and a class web page. A group of 17 parents from a private elementary classroom in a Montessori school agreed to participate in this study. Time sheets, check-off lists, feedback from parents, and statistics from MailChimp were used to collect data. The majority of the parents were pleased with the school-to-home communication during this period. The email and text message programs were the most efficient communication methods. Updating the class web page proved to be the most time-consuming communication process. This study showed why teachers should use a variety of correspondence methods in order to be effective communicators. While I will continue to use MailChimp, Remind, and my web page for parent-teacher communication, I also discovered there is room for improvement in my communication methods.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2015

Article

L'Opposizione di Aldo Agazzi al Montessorismo: Due Lettere dell'Estate 1951 [Aldo Agazzi's Opposition to Montessori: Two Letters from the Summer of 1951]

Available from: Torrossa

Publication: Annali di storia dell'educazione e delle istituzioni scolastiche, vol. 27

Pages: 243-257

Agazzi method of teaching - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Aldo Agazzi - Biographic sources, Aldo Agazzi - Philosophy, Comparative education, Correspondence, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Europe, Italy, Maria Montessori - Philosophy, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Southern Europe

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Abstract/Notes: Le due lettere che pubblichiamo sono conservate nell'Archivio Storico Missionarie della Scuola, Roma (e, in fotocopia, nell'Archivio per la Storia dell'Educazione in Italia, Brescia1): si tratta della lettera manoscritta che la contessa Myriam Gallarati Scotti Agliardi inviò a madre Luigia Tincani, fondatrice delle Missionarie, allegandovi la copia dattiloscritta di un'altra lettera, che la contessa stessa aveva ricevuto dal dott. Silvio Gavazzeni. Sono due documenti significativi che testimoniano dell'impegno attivo di Aldo Agazzi nella lotta contro...

Language: Italian

ISSN: 1723-9672, 2612-6559

Article

Giuliana Sorge, Luigia Tincani e la diffusione del metodo Montessori / Giuliana Sorge, Luigia Tincani and Dissemination of Montessori Method

Available from: Rivista di Storia dell’Educazione

Publication: Rivista di Storia dell’Educazione, vol. 8, no. 2

Pages: 83-95

Aldo Agazzi - Biographic sources, Europe, Giuliana Sorge - Biographic sources, Italy, Luigia Tincani - Biographic sources, Maria Montessori - Biographic sources, Montessori method of education, Montessori movement, Southern Europe

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Abstract/Notes: Giuliana Sorge (1903-1987) was one of Maria Montessori’s closest disciples. Many parts of her life are linked to the alternating vicissitudes of the spread of the Method in Italy. She is personally involved at the time of the breakdown of the relation between Maria Montessori and fascism. We find her in the immediate postwar period engaged in the reconstruction of the Montessori National Institution and in the dissemination of the Method in Italy. To do this, she weaves a network of relations with exponents of the political and ecclesiastical world assisted by the friendship of Luigia Tincani, a Catholic, Montessori’s friend, founder of what will become the Free University Maria SS. Assunta and a religious congregation. This emerges from an unpublished correspondence between these two women, which also contains interesting news relating to the hostility of prof. Aldo Agazzi towards the spread of the Montessori Method.

Language: Italian

DOI: 10.36253/rse-10374

ISSN: 2532-2818

Book Section

Letter to Ashram Boys and Girls (January 30, 1932)

Available from: Internet Archive

Book Title: The Collected Works of Mahatma Gandhi

Pages: 50-51

Asia, India, Mahatma Gandhi - Biographic sources, Mahatma Gandhi - Correspondence, Mahatma Gandhi - Writings, South Asia

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Abstract/Notes: A brief letter from Gandhi to young children of Ashram's discussing Montessori's educational methods with some remarks regarding specific elements.

Language: English

Published: New Delhi: Publications Division, Government of India, Jan 1972

Volume: 49 (January 4, 1932 - May 30, 1932) of 100

Doctoral Dissertation

Montessori in India: A Study of the Application of her Method in a Developing Country

Available from: University of Sydney Libraries

Asia, Ceylon, India, Maria Montessori - Biographic sources, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., South Asia, Sri Lanka, Theosophical Society, Theosophy

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Abstract/Notes: In India the Montessori Method has survived in various forms for a continuous period longer than virtually anywhere else in the world. Its adoption coincided with a crucial period in the nation's history when a growing nationalist movement was seeking to rid the country of foreign domination and dependency. Although the Method was foreign, the emphasis on liberty and the development of individuals capable of independent thought and action appealed to elite groups and to elements of the nationalist movement. The Method was believed to be modern and scientific and was greeted with enthusiasm by those who sought modernization and progress in a traditional society. Late in life Maria Montessori, accompanied by her son Mario, visited India, and her presence over a period of almost nine years from 1939-46 and 1947-49 gave a boost to the growing Montessori movement. Whilst in India, Montessori gave full voice to the spiritualism inherent in her work. In the West she was considered eccentric and her Method out of date, but in India, where religion exerted a powerful and pervasive influence, she was consistent with an ancient tradition of religious educators. A sprinkling of Indians had always attended her international training courses abroad, and in India they flocked to hear her message of human regeneration through the child. The Montessori Method was largely patronized by a relatively affluent, Westernized and urbanized elite who could afford the expensive apparatus. Gandhi, however, had urged Montessori to devise materials in accordance with the economic and social conditions prevailing in India's villages. Although she found much time during the years in India to develop her Method further to cover the period from birth to three years and from six to twelve years, she appears to have given little thought to its application among the country's largely illiterate poor who comprised the bulk of the population. However, an "Indianized" Montessori movement emerged in Western India, allied to the Gandhian nationalist movement, which became concerned with "adapting" the Method according to Gandhian principles, and applying it in the villages. The resultant hybrid pre-primary education enjoyed widespread application in post-Independence India and received recognition at the national level by government and non-government agencies. Recently it has been afforded a crucial role in a major human resources development programme designed to alleviate the effects of poverty amongst women and young children. The present study has drawn on a wide range of primary and secondary sources including archival material, newspapers, journals, published and unpublished correspondence, and personal interviews to trace the history of the Montessori movement in India from the time of early interest in the Method in 1912. The early chapters provide an introduction to Montessori's life and work and an historical background to the adoption of the Method. The application of the Method and the expansion of the Montessori movement is explored in subsequent chapters and, finally, in chapters six and seven, the study discusses directions in the movement after the departure of Madame Montessori and her son in 1949.

Language: English

Published: Sydney, Australia, 1987

Book Section

Letter to Parasram Mehrotra (April 18, 1932)

Available from: Internet Archive

Book Title: The Collected Works of Mahatma Gandhi

Pages: 321-322

Asia, India, Mahatma Gandhi - Biographic sources, Mahatma Gandhi - Correspondence, Mahatma Gandhi - Speeches, addresses, etc., South Asia

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Abstract/Notes: In this brief letter, Gandhi writes that as parents, 'it is our duty, therefore, to create the school atmosphere even at home so that the children may spontaneously go on learning all the time what they can. This is the true Montessori method.' He continues on to discuss how the Ashram should be setup as a learning environment, like that of a school.

Language: English

Published: New Delhi: Publications Division, Government of India, Jan 1972

Volume: 49 (January 4, 1932 - May 30, 1932) of 100

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