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93 results

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Managing the Use of Resources in Multi-Grade Classrooms

Available from: African Journals Online

Publication: South African Journal of Education, vol. 39, no. 3

Africa, Classroom environment, Montessori materials, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, Nongraded schools, Prepared environment, South Africa, Southern Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa

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Abstract/Notes: This study examined how teachers in multi-grade classrooms manage and use available resources in their classrooms. The study focused on multi-grade classrooms in farm schools in the Free State province of South Africa that cover Grades 1 to 9. The concepts “multi-grade classrooms” and “resources” are explained below. The availability and utilisation of resources in multi-grade classrooms is discussed in some depth. A qualitative research design was used to collect data. Interviews were conducted with 9 teachers who worked in multi-grade classrooms. The data reveals that the availability of resources has improved somewhat in the multi-grade classrooms surveyed; however, textbooks specifically meant for multi-grade classrooms are still lacking. The data also points to several other trends. For example, most multi-grade schools in the sample have insufficient resources. Where available, the resources are either under-utilised or used improperly. Furthermore, it is usually the case that learners are required to share resources across various grades. Moreover, teachers often use their personal resources to get their work done, and in this regard, smartphones play an important part. Finally, the study also reveals that teachers do try to use various types of resources to cater for different learning styles.Keywords: activity centres; classroom organisation; Montessori educational theory; multi-grade classrooms; resource corners; resources

Language: English

DOI: 10.15700/saje.v39n3a1599

ISSN: 2076-3433

Article

The Revelation of the Universal Child

Available from: ERIC

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 40, no. 2

Pages: 1-13

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Abstract/Notes: Lynne Lawrence puts forward the solemn belief that each child is fulfilling the destiny of every human being. As children make their own contributions to their unique family, society, and global life, they are putting the common good above their own needs. Lawrence begins her case for universality with a moving statement from an African teacher in a Montessori training course. She then goes on to observe the human tendencies and constructive energies that every child carries across the planes of development. Lawrence's solid global framework stands as the preface for this journal. [This chapter is adapted from the talk that was presented at the NAMTA conference titled "Fostering Montessori Preparedness for Global Citizenship" in Seattle, WA, November 13-16, 2014.]

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

The Potential for Using Visual Elicitation in Understanding Preschool Teachers’ Beliefs of Appropriate Educational Practices

Available from: African Journals Online

Publication: South African Journal of Education, vol. 32, no. 4

Pages: 393-405

Africa, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Kenya, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, South Africa, Southern Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa

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Abstract/Notes: We explore the use of video and photo elicitation in a research study undertaken to understand the way in which preschool teachers perceive and construct their provision of children’s educational experiences. We explore the value of visually elicited interviews based on video footage and photographs captured during teaching and learning in four classrooms in two preschool settings in Kenya. Through visually elicited interviews, both the teachers and the researcher constructed meaningful conversations (interviews) to explore preschool teachers’ practical experiences and their beliefs, understanding and interpretation of developmentally appropriate educational practices. This paper targets the possible value of and contribution made by visual data generation procedures, as well as their inherent challenges, in order to add to the body of knowledge on visually elicited interviews.

Language: English

DOI: 10.15700/saje.v32n4a661

ISSN: 2076-3433

Article

Are Nursery Schools 'Nice Places' for Children with HIV/AIDS? The Case of Karen Perreira v Buccleuch Montessori Pre-school and Primary (Pty) Ltd

Available from: Sabinet African Journals

Publication: South African Law Journal, vol. 123, no. 2

Pages: 220-231

Africa, Children's rights, HIV-positive children, Human rights, Montessori schools, South Africa, Southern Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa

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Language: English

ISSN: 0258-2503

Article

The Childhoods' Network

Publication: Montessori Leadership

Pages: 8–9

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Abstract/Notes: Southern African Montessori Association

Language: English

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Societal Values and Policies May Curtail Preschool Children’s Physical Activity in Child Care Centers

Available from: American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP)

Publication: Pediatrics, vol. 129, no. 2

Pages: 265-274

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Abstract/Notes: BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Three-fourths of US preschool-age children are in child care centers. Children are primarily sedentary in these settings, and are not meeting recommended levels of physical activity. Our objective was to identify potential barriers to children’s physical activity in child care centers. METHODS: Nine focus groups with 49 child care providers (55% African American) were assembled from 34 centers (inner-city, suburban, Head Start, and Montessori) in Cincinnati, Ohio. Three coders independently analyzed verbatim transcripts for themes. Data analysis and interpretation of findings were verified through triangulation of methods. RESULTS: We identified 3 main barriers to children’s physical activity in child care: (1) injury concerns, (2) financial, and (3) a focus on “academics.” Stricter licensing codes intended to reduce children's injuries on playgrounds rendered playgrounds less physically challenging and interesting. In addition, some parents concerned about potential injury, requested staff to restrict playground participation for their children. Small operating margins of most child care centers limited their ability to install abundant playground equipment. Child care providers felt pressure from state mandates and parents to focus on academics at the expense of gross motor play. Because children spend long hours in care and many lack a safe place to play near their home, these barriers may limit children's only opportunity to engage in physical activity. CONCLUSIONS: Societal priorities for young children—safety and school readiness—may be hindering children’s physical development. In designing environments that optimally promote children’s health and development, child advocates should think holistically about potential unintended consequences of policies.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1542/peds.2011-2102

ISSN: 0031-4005, 1098-4275

Master's Thesis

The Activity Preferences of Pre-School Children Exposed to an Environment Based on Montessorian Principles

Available from: University of the Orange Free State - Institutional Repository

Africa, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Preschool children, South Africa, Southern Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa

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Abstract/Notes: The initial purpose of the study was twofold: to assess the possibility of establishing a Montessori environment without formal training, and to determine the extent to which this was successful. The literature study undertaken investigated Montessori from a historical perspective, before detailing the elements of the theory necessary for establishment of a research environment. The positive value of Montessorianism was shown indisputably by an indepth investigation of the opportunities for fulfilling developmental tasks offered by the Montessori environment. The relationship between the theories of Montessori and Piaget was investigated. Extensive agreement as well as areas of disagreement were discovered, the latter mainly due to Piaget's epistemological approach as opposed to Montessori's concern with the needs for development. The research evaluation showed general positive effects of exposure to a Montessori environment. Results were however difficult to interpret due to differences and weaknesses in methodology. In the context of the nature of Montessorianism, an evaluation of process (the HOW of development as addressed by Montessori) is suggested in preference to the nomal product evaluation provided by purely testing procedures. A Montessori environment was established after careful consideration of the works of Maria Montessori. Construction of apparatus was undertaken. Children and facilitators were recruited on a voluntary basis. A total of 27 children were obtained. Two mature facilitators oversaw the running of the group. After a period of 6 months, allowed for settling in, naturalistic observation was begun. Observation was done by classification of the use of specific apparatus into broad activity categories. The proportion time each child engaged in a particular activity category was recorded. This data was summarized and analysed in order to investigate trends in development. The raw data was used for hypothesis testing. Four hypotheses were tested: a sensitive period for motor refinement was not confirmed using the Mann-Whitney U test; a sensitivity for pre-academic activities was confirmed, also using the Mann-Whitney U test; and a preference for functional play over fantasy play in the pre-school period was confirmed, using the parametric t-test. The fourth hypothesis, based on test data delivered by the Griffiths Developmental Scales affirmed the general facilitative effects of the research environment. The sign test was used. The presence of sensitive periods was taken as a sufficient indication that the research environment was "Montessorian", established and run without formal training. The test results proved the facilitativeness of the experience, further supporting the possibility of running a Montessori school without the expense of training. By way of conclusion it was suggested that further research be undertaken to establish the visibility of Montessori in the broader South African context, given the proof that the elitism engendered by expensive training and administration procedures of this approach is not warranted. Given also its benefits, proven elsewhere, the present study is considered a pilot study to further research on this subject in the wider cultural and ethnic conditions.

Language: English

Published: Bloemfontein, South Africa, 1987

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Mimetic Theory and the Use of Daily Life Events

Available from: Academia

Publication: Relational Child and Youth Care Practice, vol. 26, no. 2

Pages: 57-62

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Abstract/Notes: The Therapeutic Use of Daily Life Events is a practice model that incorporates the mostfundamental approach to Child and Youth Care. There is a risk for a divide between academicconceptualisations and practice to develop if they do not grow together. To contribute to this ‘growing together’, the authors from the two disciplines of Child and Youth Development and Philosophy joined their perceptions and approaches on the empowering of children within the various teachable moments thatform part of their interactions with adults. The article explores the usefulness of Mimetic Theory as anunderlying theory behind the practice approach proposed by the adoption of the Use of Daily Life Events inthe work with children in need of care. Although this article builds on the views of various authors fromdifferent countries, support and examples for the claims made in this article will be South African specific.

Language: English

ISSN: 1705-625X, 2410-2954

Doctoral Dissertation

Education as a Tool for Social Change: Case Study of an Arizona Inner-City Charter School

Available from: University of San Francisco

Social transformation

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Abstract/Notes: It is a very difficult task to provide adequate education in the United States for children living in an inner-city environment, with problems of poverty, minority status, drugs, crime, gangs, suicide, despair, and many single-parent households. This is a Case Study of how one Arizona inner-city poverty community has risen to answer these educational demands for its children through a Montessori theory-based Charter Pre-12 school. The 650 student population served in this school is approximately 80% Hispanic American, 12% African American, and 8% Native, Asian and European American. Data were gathered from extensive interviews, observations, and document analysis. They were analyzed and evaluated in three ways: first, according to a literature review of the educational theories of Maria Montessori, then according to those of Paulo Freire, and lastly, according to a review of Charter school books, articles, and government documents available up to January of 2000. The results were an in-depth description of first, the history of this community's needs, its struggle to establish and fund the school, then the resulting educational program which it developed and implemented, and lastly, the community's positive evaluation of it's efforts. The curriculum described had extensive use of ESL and cultural appreciation programs, hands-on student initiated and student-implemented programs, integrated curriculum and critical thinking programs, job-skills related programs, self-esteem and character development programs, and Sustainable Systems Ecology Education demonstration programs. All these findings were presented in a manner which could be useful to other Administrators, who might desire to use this school's example to begin or to improve their own programs for a similarly disadvantaged inner-city population. Conclusions were that after five years of operation, this community empowerment school has indeed found methods, curriculum and programs that have successfully helped to meet the emotional, cultural, moral, and educational needs of the children in this particular poverty community. Conclusions were also that this community's experiences are valuable and appropriate for examination by other prospective Charter school Administrators from similar communities.

Language: English

Published: San Francisco, California, 2000

Book

Early Childhood Education in Nigeria: Proceedings of the International Seminar on Early Childhood Education, Zaria, 4-8 July, 1983

Africa, Nigeria, Sub-Saharan Africa, West Africa

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Abstract/Notes: Proceedings of the Internationa Seminar on Early Childhood Education, held in Zaria [Nigeria], 4-8 July, 1983. "Organised by the Institute of Education, Ahmadu Bello University in Collaboration with the London Montessori Institute"--Title page verso. Early childhood education at the crossroads in Nigeria / Emmanuel U. Emovon (17 p.). -- Montessori philosophy in early childhood education / Sandra Nash Petrek (22 p.). -- Cultural roots of the child's moral and intellectual growth in Africa / Etim N. E. Udoh (40 p.). -- Implications of Piagetan theory to elementary education in Nigeria / O. M. Onibokun (24 p.). -- Headstart : assumptions and curriculum models--what relevance for Nigeria? / Eileen B. Wilson (20 p.). -- Classroom pedagogy: a case for the development of critical thinking / Rodney Burton (32 p.). -- Childhood education in Nigeria: A study of Ilorin schools / S. O. Medahunsi (32 p.). -- Day in a pre-school: A Nigerian experience / Kathleen Kano (20 p.). Early childhood education in two cultures: The U.S.A. and the Jamaican experience / Anne Lou Blevins (45 p.). -- Traditional factors in African education / D. O. Adewoye (27 p.). -- Moral development in the child through Christian education / J Idowu-Fearon (18 p.). -- Educating the teachers of children / Grace Alele Williams (19 p.). -- Child, the teacher and the classroom with relation to nursery education / Fola A. Fagbohun (16 p.). -- Child's socialization in Islam / Zainab Said Kabir (31 p.). -- Environment and the education of the child / J. M. Ibiwoye (24 p.). -- Environment and the education of the child / A. B. Ayanniyi (15 p.). -- Bilingualism in early childhood education in Nigeria: Problems and possibilities / Theresa T. Imasuen (15 p.). -- Comparative study of the role expectations of children's needs in the Carribean and Nigeria / S. U. Compton-Adegbite (15 p.). -- Teacher and the child with special educational needs / Karen Odock (13 p.). -- Special education for pre-primary children: Intervention and remediation / C. A. Sam (26 p.). -- Theory and practice of educating maladjusted children in Nigeria / J. A. Shindi (18 p.). -- Children with special educational needs: The case of bilingual children / R. A. Chijioke (30 p.).

Language: English

Published: Zaria, Nigeria: Institute of Education, Ahmadu Bello University, 1983

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